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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've heard a few dfferent people ask what kind of books they should have in their prepper library. One subject that seems to be overlooked by preppers is foraging. I firmly believe that every prepper should include at least 1 region-specific book on foraging edible wild plants in their prepper library.

I just picked up my third foraging book today and paid a whopping $3.00 for it at a swap meet. Here's the link in case you're interested: A Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants: Eastern and central North America (Peterson Field Guides): Lee Allen Peterson, Roger Tory Peterson: 0046442926225: Amazon.com: Books

The great thing about foraging skills is that it will turn your backyard into a grocery store. During a disaster you'll be eating well of backyard edibles when your neighbors are starving because they don't know any better.
 

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thank goodness, there you are, i was afraid i lost you in the crowd! this is a super idea! one book i did pick up was the alminac that says when to plant what to plant for the region. i didnt think for foraging while my garden grew!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thank goodness, there you are, i was afraid i lost you in the crowd! this is a super idea! one book i did pick up was the alminac that says when to plant what to plant for the region. i didnt think for foraging while my garden grew!
Hahaha! I know Shotlady! I'm not going anywhere :) I'm still looking for PrepperRecon. Haven't seen him in a long while!

Yes, exactly, foraging will keep your family fed between seasons and while the garden grows. Also a good thing to do when you're out in the woods hunting large game, just in case you don't bag an animal that day. You won't go home with an empty belly.
 

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I've heard a few dfferent people ask what kind of books they should have in their prepper library. One subject that seems to be overlooked by preppers is foraging. I firmly believe that every prepper should include at least 1 region-specific book on foraging edible wild plants in their prepper library.
That is in the SAS survival handbook. For every region on EVERY continent!

one book i did pick up was the alminac that says when to plant what to plant for the region. i didnt think for foraging while my garden grew!
The Farmers Almanac?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That is in the SAS survival handbook. For every region on EVERY continent!
Great book! I've never read the foraging section; however, I know that I need color photos of plants to feel 100% comfortable identifying and eating them, especially plants that have poisonous look alikes.

I guess that's why I opt to have several books. So I have a good assortment of color photos to compare to.
 

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To the OP: excellent advice! There are many books out there but you need to aquire them now. When everthing goes south it will be too late.

One word of caution. Be very careful gathering mushrooms. It is very easy to make fatal mistakes when it comes to mushrooms. Pictures aren't enough, you have to learn how to make spore prints.

Hey Jim, thanks for the post on John Seymours book. I'll be looking to add it to my collection.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
That book is actually next on my list of ones I need to acquire, Jim. I've heard great things about it. Honestly, I've stopped buying prepper books on Amazon because I find so many at swap meets and yard sales for a buck or two.

Honestly, whenever I find a good prepper book for a dollar, I am so tempted to ask the person like, 'Are you sure you wanna get rid of this? We live in tough times, lady.' LOL. I feel like I'm robbing them of their references for when TSHTF.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
With mushrooms, in my region there's a couple of mushrooms that have no poisonous look a likes and are pretty easy to identify. I plan to stick to those mushrooms and forget about the rest.

There is actually a foraging school here in Maine. Once I have childcare I plan to take a few of these classes:

Foraging | Maine Primitive Skills School
 

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PM... I've spent the last few weeks cramming on this very subject... and just finished my first batch of acorn flour. It tastes great by itself... but I haven't used it in a meal yet. I'll let you know. But... I'd like to add that books alone are only part of it. I have books... but practical knowledge of what works and how much effort it takes can only come from experience. Right now... I'm trying to figure out which Colorado grasses will work best to provide the flour gluten I need to keep my bread products from falling apart. Additionally... I've found that a new essential item for my BOB is a potato peeler... so I can scrape the fuzzy or thorny skin off of some of the edibles... like thistle.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
PM... I've spent the last few weeks cramming on this very subject... and just finished my first batch of acorn flour. It tastes great by itself... but I haven't used it in a meal yet. I'll let you know. But... I'd like to add that books alone are only part of it. I have books... but practical knowledge of what works and how much effort it takes can only come from experience. Right now... I'm trying to figure out which Colorado grasses will work best to provide the flour gluten I need to keep my bread products from falling apart. Additionally... I've found that a new essential item for my BOB is a potato peeler... so I can scrape the fuzzy or thorny skin off of some of the edibles... like thistle.
This is why I really need to get in and take a class with trained professionals. It's the only thing that will take my study to the next level where I actually feel comfortable consuming things I forage, aside from the standard raspberries, blackberries, and blueberries.

Also foraging is definitely a vital skill to have, but it's not something you want to suddenly take up when the SHTF. Allergic reactions can happen with wild foods (just like with any grocery store food). That's not something you want to go through when there is no possibility of receiving medical treatment. Start now, practice as much as you can, and learn what local edibles you and your family can subsist on. When you do consume something for the first time, start by preparing just a tiny sliver and work your way up from there.
 
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