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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im going to put together a bug out bag to carry in my truck, so being new to all of this I have no idea what all I really need (this will be my first bug out bag). Money is tight so I want to buy the right stuff the first time instead of wasting money on things I don`t need.

So if you guys can help me with a list of things I need to get it would be a big help to me.

Thanks.
 

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A list is easy enough. Most everything can be bought off Amazon these days too. We'd really need to know what you're going to be doing with the bag. Is it just to get home? Over how many miles and through what kind of territory? Or it is for longer. Is it for long term survival not knowing where you might end up or going to a bug out location a long ways off? It all changes things. Either way you start with the basics, food, water, shelter, security.
 

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Yup, Fuzzee is correct. We'd ned to know what your intended usage is. A Get Home Bag is different from a Bug Out Bag, and an Every Day Carry bag may be better than both.

Planning on having a truck gun too? Do you keep your truck gear separate (shovel, flares, tire chains, etc.)? Worried about wildfires or animals? Seasonal adjustments?

Lots of skilled preppers on here, but you have to tell us what will confront you before we can help you find ways to overcome what that might entail.
 

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Fuzzee is spot on.

One of the best ways to determine the content of your bag is to ask yourself a series of questions and determine your personal priorities. Initially I used a time reference… 'what would I need to have if I had to wait for several hours in cold/wet weather before I got assistance?' From there I extended it to 24 hrs, 2 days, distance travelled, etc.

Dehydration and exposure are 2 things that need to be addressed immediately (exposure could mean intense sun and heat). Maintaining energy and alertness can be critical as well, so some form of high calorie, but sustained carb source is important. As far as the bag itself, I started with $14.00 Walmart On-Sale day pack with lots of pockets and upgraded when I started to out grow it. I now have a Condor MOLE bag, so I can add pockets or other attachments without having to replace the bag itself.

It gets more subjective after that… fire starter/fuel, rope/cord, utility knife/tool, small rolled plastic tarp, whistle/signal device, defensive weapon (if so disposed). The list can go on indefinitely. There are a lot of great ideas on this forum and I'm sure, if you are looking for recommendations for specific items, manufacturer, source, etc, all you have to do is ask and you'll get plenty of feedback.

The Strictly Bug Out Bags subject area will probably provide some good info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A list is easy enough. Most everything can be bought off Amazon these days too. We'd really need to know what you're going to be doing with the bag. Is it just to get home? Over how many miles and through what kind of territory? Or it is for longer. Is it for long term survival not knowing where you might end up or going to a bug out location a long ways off? It all changes things. Either way you start with the basics, food, water, shelter, security.
It would probably be a get home bag for the most part. Its 17 miles from work to my house and its mostly rolling hills and open farm land. If I had to bug out I have a large alice pack that im working on for a more serious situation. My bug out location is ten miles from my house.
 

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It would probably be a get home bag for the most part. Its 17 miles from work to my house and its mostly rolling hills and open farm land. If I had to bug out I have a large alice pack that im working on for a more serious situation. My bug out location is ten miles from my house.
For a get home bag at that distance you don't need to carry the world on your shoulders. It's good to take into mind that it could take longer than you'd like so work around that. Food, water, shelter and security are good places to start. So is figuring the bag your going to base it off of and the space you'll have to work with. Camelbak's and other hydration backpacks make good bag for either getting home or bugging out. It's all in the size you use. Small ones with a little extra space can be enough for getting home.

Amazon.com: camelbak - Hydration Packs / Backpacks & Bags: Sports & Outdoors

Shelter can be provided with a military style poncho and some 550 cord between some trees. Enough for a night anyways or two and you can use it for rain protection while moving and it rolls up small for storage.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref...s=aps&field-keywords=poncho&rh=i:aps,k:poncho
poncho-tent-2nd-poncho-front.jpg

For food think about what you normally it and what would be packable and go furthest. Many people, myself included like MRE entree's stripped down to there last wrapper. One can be fairly filling. A couple should be fine for you with a few power or protein bars thrown in the pack.

Amazon.com: mre entree

Dehydrated is also good, but you have to use some of your water to hydrate them which can be a water drain if it's not heavily available.

Amazon.com: Mountainhouse entree

For water, if you don't go with a bladder pack, than a Nalgene bottle or military canteen is good.

Amazon.com: nalgene

You'll need to purify the water so a filter is next or you can use tablets if your comfortable with what water sources are around you.

Amazon.com: Katadyn

Amazon.com: water tablets

For fire, simple lighters can be fine, but fire starters are tougher.

Amazon.com: firesteel

A very important tool for any form of bugging out or getting home if a good knife. It's useful for building shelter, cleaning game if you get some, cutting rope, security, eating, etc...
Fixed blades are tougher, but a good folding knife of the right size and quality can do a lot.

Amazon.com: Spyderco

Think about protective clothing in the truck to keep to go with you when you leave it.
Maps, a compass, a flashlight, and small medical supplies, especially prescription spares if you take them are a priority.
 
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