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As a city slicker I haven't a clue about livestock, so supposing I catch a pig running round the countryside and want to eat it, can somebody talk me and other slickers through the butchery procedure in this thread about how to get it onto our dinner plates?
For example do we have to kill it first? (sorry couldn't resist the joke)
And I hear some farmers keep pigs without ever eating them, why is that? Do they keep them as pets or what?

US soldier catches pig on Kwajalein atoll, 1944
 

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As a city slicker I haven't a clue about livestock, so supposing I catch a pig running round the countryside and want to eat it, can somebody talk me and other slickers through the butchery procedure in this thread about how to get it onto our dinner plates?
For example do we have to kill it first? (sorry couldn't resist the joke)
And I hear some farmers keep pigs without ever eating them, why is that? Do they keep them as pets or what?
You don't have to kill it but you'll have a hard time getting that rascal to stay on the plate next to the eggs. Seriously, I have been interested in this subject as well. I'd like to know how to cure hams for long term preservation and storage. Properly done it could be a profitable skill to have not to mention tasty.
Thanks for posting this LJ!

punch
 

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every animal with 4 legs is just a different sized rabbit. skin, cut the meat off the bones, its as simple as that. I process my deer right in the field,without gutting. take the hide off and work on the hide laid out, boning the meat as you go and placing in a game bag (pillow case works good). The choice tenderloin strips can be accessed behind the last rib. Leave the guts,bones, hooves ,head out where the scavengers can clean them up, and they will in about 2 nights. No need to drag the entire animal home and than have to dispose of it.
 

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Awesome, I was lucky enough to watch/help/hinder a domestic hog slaughter, from walking to the pen, discussing the price, and choosing said hog. Then the fun stopped and the work started. Built a fire below a 55 gallon drum turned at a slight angle to heat water, while my buddy "J-bird" dispatched the animal with a "quick-pig-stick" to the jugular. We quickly gutted the animal and then rolled him around in the scalding hot water, holding him by his ears..Then quickly scraped the hair off all of the beautiful skin..
A quick ride home and some other friends had built a nice above ground oven with cinder blocks, so we spiced him up in place on top of the "pit". The party started then....please remember all these activities were accompanied by large amounts of budweiser, and some "local herbs" that made you hungry....That slow cooked pigskin was almost as good as the meat....a weekend to remember....
 

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Yes Punch, I would also love to learn to cure a ham. I will research it, I see some smokers made from old refridgerators, so I may delve into it. By the way, I have supposed to "gone to the market for habaneros and sliced beef" for some friends, and will make dang sure I set some back for ya...P.M. you in a couple of days...
 

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As a city slicker I haven't a clue about livestock, so supposing I catch a pig running round the countryside and want to eat it, can somebody talk me and other slickers through the butchery procedure in this thread about how to get it onto our dinner plates?
For example do we have to kill it first? (sorry couldn't resist the joke)
And I hear some farmers keep pigs without ever eating them, why is that? Do they keep them as pets or what?
How can you even think of harming the poor innocent pig? Go to the supermarket and buy your meat from them. That way no animals are harmed."
This is a paraphrased letter to the editor from some woman in Washington state. God I hope she wasn't serious, but I feel she is that ignorant.
 

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We used to handle all our own meat needs from farm and game harvesting. Hams are first brined in salt water to remove moisture, then slow (cold) smoked until cured. They keep long term without refrigeration. I cannot give you a recipe for doing so, but encourage those who are interested to research the subject and practice with small quantities. All the scraps became sausage and it too was smoked.
 

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I have been raising pigs for a year and a half now. I have had one litter of 7 so far. My female is bred again and should be about 3 months out at this time. I sold all the babies from the first litter but will be keeping one from the second to have a pig roast and bonfire party later this summer. I am hoping to get a couple more females this summer too so that I have babies almost year round. They are easy to keep and fun to watch. Mine have taken to chewing on rocks for what ever reason. It's silly. I have a couple places I get free food for them. I just hit up a couple restaurants and they save me a couple bags of food a week. It's MJ h nicer than buying a 15 dollar bag of feed a week.
 

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Once you catch and kill your pig Lucky Jim you need to start a BIG POT of boiling water. When the bleeding is slowed, dip in the hot water and roll over to loose the hairs and scrap the hairs off... repeat until all the hairs are scrapped. String up with a stout pole. The neck is cut around the base of the head and ringed so that it can be twisted off and set aside. Then with a sharp knife cut from the crotch to the chin. Then the intestines can be cut from the anus and tied shut. The liver can then be cut out and cut up and set aside to soak for later. The cutting operation has been done in several ways. Remove the leaf lard which is fat held by the intestines. With an axe, chop all the way down both sides of the backbone, and lift out. The meat then falls into two pieces. Remove the tenderloin (this is also what you make Canadian bacon from), It lays on either side of the backbone. Under that is the fatback. Then remove the two sections of rib cage by slicing between the outside of the ribs and the inside of the middlin meat. Find the joints and cut out the shoulder roast and hams off. Whatever meat you have leftover, make into sausage.
 

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I want to watch the catching part that should be amusing.
Are going to shave the pig or skin it two different ways of doing it depending on where you are from.
A pig offers a lot of cut and Lard that can be used in may ways.
Some serious reading is in store for you.
Pork the other white meat.
 

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IMG_20130831_230258_884.jpg

This hog I caught with my boys in Jefferson turned into a bunch of crazy old school European smoked meats. I called up Patek meats in Austell, they said yeah come on bring him over. The guy started in some Bulgarian country and moved here, I got smoked chops, Kielbasas stuffed by hand, Jaegerwurst, smoked loins raw loins, the whole pig was done. He told me they cold smoke everything in alder and pecan and they brine EVERYTHING in brown sugar, salt white pepper and distilled water before smoking for 24 hours in some cases like ribs. Some of it keeps for years.
 

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IMG_20140206_161914_768.jpg IMG_20140205_174448_817.jpg

See you can see the grain and the color, I believe him at his story. It's not hard, but if you follow guidelines like that its kind of hard to go wrong it's time tested.
 

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I have hunted for wild boar before. Torch their hides as the skin and bristles are a pain to shave off and cut off. Take all the legs with you, as well as the liver, ribs, kidneys, and any other cuts you want (belly, loin, shoulder, cheeks, snout) and leave the rest for the local wildlife. Foxes, cats, and various birds will ensure there is nothing left.
 

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I have butchered a few pigs. The only issue is I never really know how to put it into words I was just shown what to do and then away I went.
 

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Awesome, I was lucky enough to watch/help/hinder a domestic hog slaughter, from walking to the pen, discussing the price, and choosing said hog. Then the fun stopped and the work started. Built a fire below a 55 gallon drum turned at a slight angle to heat water, while my buddy "J-bird" dispatched the animal with a "quick-pig-stick" to the jugular. We quickly gutted the animal and then rolled him around in the scalding hot water, holding him by his ears..Then quickly scraped the hair off all of the beautiful skin..
A quick ride home and some other friends had built a nice above ground oven with cinder blocks, so we spiced him up in place on top of the "pit". The party started then....please remember all these activities were accompanied by large amounts of budweiser, and some "local herbs" that made you hungry....That slow cooked pigskin was almost as good as the meat....a weekend to remember....
AHHH, the "selected herbs" do make it all worthwhile.I love a pig roast.especially the Hawaiian pig roasts we used to have in Cali. with Hawaiian "herbs".
 

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Raised a pig last year, my first, she grew from 15 pounds to 425 in seven months, best pork I've ever eaten. I'm picking up this years pig Saturday, I can only hope for similar success.
 
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