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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Gang,

So I am interested in learning about reloading. Besides having no clue where to start and how to get going, I am also worried about the safety aspects of it. Working with lead, working with gun powder. I also have 5 young kids at home and curious on dangers from that angle as well. (I currently do not have a workshop area that I can use.) Thanks in advance!
 

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Super safe. just don't go eating your components. Casting your own bullets can be a little dangerous - but not if you have a clean and safe area to do it in and have half a brain.

About the only think you would have to be concerned with if you aren't casting is you don't want to breathe the dust while tumbling brass, but just do it in the garage or other open area and you should be fine.

Depending on how much you want to reload and how many calibers you can look at a single stage or a progressive press, I would suggest working with someone locally who reloads to learn the trade then invest in a progressive press. I went the single stage route and it is just too slow, but now I'm several hundred dollars into it and it is hard for me to 'start over' with a progressive press.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
We know a guy that does reloads near us. I will have to see when I can go over and check out the process. Any links to gear I would need or how much it costs to get rolling if I just want to make 9mm to start with? Also, once you get rolling, about how much a round is it for say 9mm.
 

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Buy a reloading manual (doesn't matter which) and read it.
They are full of safety precautions and instructions.
Reloading is not difficult.
Buying the basic setup and components will be spendy., do some research.

PM me if I can help with info.
 

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Find someone that does it hang out with them a while . I have been doing my home work on the subject and the more I learn the more I find my first impression where wrong.
 

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The one single thing you MUST know and accept about reloading: it is a one track process. What I mean by that is that if you want to be a SAFE, . . . effective, . . . and quality type reloader, . . . then reloading must be the ONE and ONLY thing going on in your head at that time.

Trying to keep a kitten off the reloading bench, . . . play with a puppy, . . . or babysit 1, 2, or more kids, . . . nahhhhhhh, . . . don't even think of it. There are too many things that can go south in the reloading process.

That said, . . . reloading is a fun experience, . . . it can be financially rewarding to a certain degree, . . . and it is a challenge to everyone's ability.

I for one will not, . . . WILL NOT, . . . sit down and begin reloading on a whim. I have to be in the right frame of mind, . . . ready to give it my 100% undivided attention. If I find myself drifting off, . . . I quit for the day.

The rewards come in a job well done, . . . and some of the best ammo you could ever buy. For me it is enough of a reward.

But again as previously mentioned, . . . get a mentor to get you started right.

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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Start by downloading and reading these, they're free.

http://www.lymanproducts.com/lyman/presses-and-kits/pdf/IntroToReloading.pdf

Instructions - Lee Precision

Reloading ? A Beginner?s Guide ? Part 1 | The Shooter's Log

Reloading, A Beginner?s Guide Part II | The Shooter's Log

RCBS - Precisioneered Shooting Products - Step-By-Step Reloading
This one I copied piece-by-piece and pasted into a WORD file and saved it.

There are probably plenty of youtube videos available on the subject also.
Go to local gun stores, they should know how to contact shooting competition clubs, maybe even a reloading club. At least one gun store/shooting range here in my town holds reloading classes, of course it's for a price but you'll get to eyeball the equipment live and probably handle it too.
 

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There is a learning curve to reloading, that is best approached with help from a "competent" reloader. Gun shops that rely on reloading supplies and components for a large portion of their sales will often have reloading classes one can attend. It's something you might look into.
 

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All of the previous advice given has been solid, I would recommend picking up a couple of manuals and reading before investing in anything else. "The ABC's of Reloading" is supposed to be a great read for the novice reloader and I can recommend both the Speer and Lyman manuals for their sections of the process of reloading. I would also second the recommendation of finding a veteran reloader to mentor you but you need to find someone that you deem to be safe and the only way you can do that is to have some knowledge of the process so read first. I don't usually recommend the youtube idea simply because you have no idea of the youtuber's track record or how long they've been loading but if you keep those things in mind you can get an idea of the steps anyway. As for equipment there are some great kits on the market that will allow you to pick up all the equipment you need all in one shot.

-Infidel
 

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You can probably get away with not buying any manuals to begin with. I believe the instructional part of the LEE manual is available online, and I know the Hodgdon reloading data center has tons of data as long as you are using their powder. I reload and I enjoy it, but some people find it tedious and do not want to dedicate the amount of time necessary. You can get started cheaply with a single stage press, a scale, and a set of dies, tumbling/case cleaning is not absolutely necessary and could wait until you decide to pursue the hobby (as long as you aren't picking up brass that's been sitting in the dirt for months)
 

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Most manufacturers offer kits that contain everything you need to get going, with the possible exception of a set of dies for your specific caliber. Many of these kits come with a general reloading manual.

Reloading kits usually range in price from about $125 to $300 and up, and would be a great way to test the waters. A 9mm die set would add about $35 to $70 or so.

As you gain in experience, you would probably want to upgrade some of the tools, but if you start with the basic kit, you would at least have something to fall back on if the need arises.

I would suggest buying your powder and primers locally if you can find them.
 

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There are some great resources online in the way of load data and information on getting started. The Handloaders Bench is a great forum with a ton of info, The Firing Line also has a very knowledgeable membership and their reloading section is pretty good. I will caution you about using data that doesn't come from a manufacturer, a lot of people are very free about posting their pet loads but when you check them against a manual or manufacturer's data you find that they are way over max loads. Be very careful about using someone else's loads.

-Infidel
 

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Looks like everyone has an opinion, although most are very similar. Reloading is a fun, rewarding hobby, but be carefull and go SLOW.

You said you knew someone to pal up with. Do that before you spend a penny. You may find you don't like it and avoid wasting money.

Next. I would buy not one, but at least two loading manuals. The differences are small but still there. Compare load tables and data and you'll see the difference. Finally, I would buy a single stage press in kit form. You should get the press, scale and possibly a powder measure. Some come with a single set of dies. Start reloading and learn each step of the process. Keep a log book for every loading session. Keep the case measurements, brand names, quantity of powder, primer, and date, etc.....

Have used lead bullets, but never cast them. Looking at starting casting soon, and also looking at shotshell loading. Been loading since 1985 and still learning.

Have fun and be safe. Let us know when you start and how things are progressing.

Here's links to a couple powder manufacturers websites.

Alliant Powder - Reloader's Guide

http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp
 

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ditch the conventional brass tumbler and get a Stainless Steel media tumbler its wet tumbler I have been reloading for 30 plus years and its the only way to go your brass looks like new primer pockets are spotless and the inside of the case is too no bad chemicals either water dawn dish soap and cream of tartar Stainless Steel Reloading Supplies | Tumblers, Separators, Media, Brass & More!
I dont ell or represent this comapny in any way photo (15).JPG photo (14).JPG
 

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Here is a picture of my bench its 60 inches long and i have a 36 inch wide bookcase too just not in pic photo (16).JPG
 

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tools from left to right on the bench are
1 (the blue tool) is a dillon primer pocket swager a must have for removing crimps from primer pockets Ive tried others but this is the best ive found so far
2 (Green Press) is a redding t7 Turret press this my go to press for reloading it also has an rcbs auto powder feeder on it can hold an additional 6 dies
3. ( next green press) is an rcbs pro 2000 auto indexing press I use this press for resizing and depriming all my brass. you can load on it and it is progressive but i just use it for case prep which is the most tedious part of reloading
4. (Next and last the grey black and gold tool) is a giruad case trimmer I use this to trim rifle cases upwards of a thousand cases per hr. I just processed about 3000 cases this weekend meaning, resized deprimed, cleaned and trimmed, They are ready to load primer powder and bullet. if you are going to load any volume for a rifle the giraud is worth its weight in gold.
 

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It is not rocket science

That comes from a person who's father has been casting and reloading bullet for 50 years.

To me it is simple science, melt the lead, pour the molds, grease the bullets, use a press and presto you have reliable bullets for a forth of the price of factory ammo.

The downside to your experiment is that primers and powder are 4x the price they used to be so it isn't cheap anymore.

still you can save money, learn an important skill and have a lot of fun spitting wad cutters out of your .357
 
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reloading is really easy
here are the steps I use
1. Lube your brass forget the Lube Pad and squeeze lube thats the consistency of honey use the dillon spray lube. (Note your going to Need lubed brass for next step. unless you are using carbide dies for straight wall pistol cases ( Note carbide Dies you don't lube the Brass)
2. set up dies now if you have a single stage press set up each die as directed by instructions included with die
3. deprime and resize your brass this done by the first die
4. swage primer pocket this will remove crimps from primer pockets I use the dillon primer pocket swager see link Super Swage 600: Case Preparation Equipment
5. clean your brass I use the the one that this link takes you to I have tried sonic tumblers and media tumblers save your self the headaches and get this one I promise you will not be dissapointed Stainless Steel Reloading Supplies | Tumblers, Separators, Media, Brass & More!
6. Ok now you have got all clean and shiny looking brass its time to trim your brass. you are going to need a set of calipers and your reloading manual which will tell how long to trim your cases. I have a giraud case trimmer for rifle cases and a Lyman trimmer for pistol cases.
7. now you are ready to actual load using your manual pick out a recipe and start by seating the correct primer, then the correct weighed charge of powder and then the correctly seated bullet depth meaning your reloading manual will tell your cartridge overall length using your calipers you will adjust your bullet seating die to seat your bullet deeper into the case or further out from the case depending on Your C.O.L.
(Note) reloading is really safe my dad taught me and my brothers on a mec 600 12ga reloader and an rcbs rockchuker single stage press
(Note) reloading equipment will rust keep it way from moisture and humidity I reload in the house
(Note) Do not store primers and powder together
(Note) Do not be taken in by the we have one kit with everything you need you are going to need the following
1. a press, my favorite is the Redding T7
2. dies for all the calibers you will reload spend the bucks and get get carbide dies for your straight wall cases
3. Lube Dillon spray lube
4. Calipers I dont use digital calipers I use dial calipers just my choice
5. a tumbler see link above all the others are just a waste of time
6. a case trimmer and chamfering tool some trimmers like the giraud, gracey and forster chamfer as they trim I have the Giraud and the forster If i could not afford the giraud then get the forster and the 3 way cutter head and the power drill attachemnt. I also use a lyman with a power attachement but chamfering is not done by the lyman
7. scales well I use rcbs scale and a hornady digital scale for checking powder charges I throw with my my powder thrower
8. Powder trickler I have a redding and powder thrower I really like the RCBS uniflow with case activated linkage this set up works great with the Redding T7 Precision Reloading: RCBS Uniflow Powder Measure Case Activated Linkage Kit
9. misc Manuals, loading blocks, powder, primers, bullets, brass, Inertia hammer for taking cartridges apart RCBS Pow'r Pull® Kit - The Radical Super Store at Radical Outdoors - Kalamazoo, MI
10. (Priming) the press you buy may or may not have a great priming system or it may be upgradable if it is upgrade I also keep a Lee Auto Primer on the shelf That I really Like
you will also need a primer flipping tray which has the small ridges in it the flip your primers up.

Reloading is safe its fun and its great to teach the kids you wont save any money but you will shoot a lot more (Joke) you will save money
I load for several rounds but to give you an example
A store bought box of 44Mags about 45.00 for 50 rounds = about 900.00 per thousand
I can reload said box for about .25 cents per round = about 250.00 per thousand
I shoot 3 different 44 mags Probably the biggest benefit of reloading is tuning a load to your gun you will achieve superb accuracy better than factory ammo photo (8).JPG 5 shots handloads from a S&W 629 open sights off hand at 25 yards thats a quarter in the picture
 
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I have been casting and reloading my own for years now and I Love it, To me its relaxing (although you have to pay very close attention to what you are doing) There is no better feeling then to shoot something you made (not just loaded, but made yourself) especially if you use said round to take down a nice deer or elk!
 
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