Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,123 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm STOKED. As an anniversary gift (18 years today) the inlaws got us a food saver. I'm super excited.

So... Any tips? Tricks? Hints? Good ideas? I'm looking for the stuff not covered in the manual.

What about other things? Non-conventional things? Can you vac a two way radio FRS/GMRS to keep it dry in wet conditions? That type of stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,123 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Happy anniversary!
Ah thanks! I definitely married up. She was way outta my league 18 years ago - still is today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,068 Posts
Congrats on the anniversary! That is WAY more precious than a stupid Foodsaver.

BUT, the Foodsaver is still a great gift! Mrs Inor uses ours a BUNCH. We literally wore the first one out in a couple of years. We still kept it because Mrs Inor has the attachment to vacuum seal jars with it and that still works. But the bag sealing part is completely worn out. (We are a bit extreme on the food saving thing though.) So, we bought another.

In regard to your question, we vac seal a bunch of things, batteries, O2 absorbers and basically anything that you want to keep from the elements. We also use it with mylar bags if we want an extra amount of protection.
 

·
Senior Member R.I.P.
Joined
·
2,886 Posts
Get the adaptors for regular & large mouth jars. It will allow you to vacseal dry items in mason jars.

Buy the material in rolls as it can be cut to size.

I have had some trouble with vacsealing ammo due to the sharp edges of the boxes. So went to loose packing the ammo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
Works great for stuff in the freezer for 1+ years, but I have noticed air pockets on bags that have been sealed for over 2 years. It would appear there is some air that gets through the plastic itself over longer periods. I have used it to seal ammo, but I take it out of the box first and long term I think an ammo can with an O2 absorber may be a better storage method. The sealer is great for meat in the freezer, I usually get 1/2 cow and a pig every year and nothing is freezer burned after 1 1/2 years (usually when I clean up the last cuts in stews etc.)
 
  • Like
Reactions: shotlady

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,641 Posts
Ah thanks! I definitely married up. She was way outta my league 18 years ago - still is today.
I did the same, why she's stuck with me for 25yrs is way beyond my comprehension but I'm not complaining. She's my best friend. I can tell you that I have truly been blessed! It's good to hear someone else got as lucky as I did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,616 Posts
Congratulations! Inor and I just celebrated our 18th also. Of course he was out of town on the actual day as usual (but I got nice flowers that day). As Inor stated I use our vacuum sealer a lot. Hints - put sharp objects in an open zip lock bag before sealing and usually that will keep the stuff from poking through the sealer bag. I have sealed seeds, pins and needles (extra so they do not rust), first aid supplies, fabric, extra socks in our GHBs, important papers, restaurant leftovers, meats, vegetables, fruits, dehydrated foods, just to name a few things. I am sure as soon as I post this another ten things will come to mind.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,178 Posts
Happy anniversary, may you enjoy many more!
Works great for stuff in the freezer for 1+ years, but I have noticed air pockets on bags that have been sealed for over 2 years. It would appear there is some air that gets through the plastic itself over longer periods.
I've had a "Food saver" for so many years I can't actually say when I bought it. When I moved out of our first house and took stuff out of the chest freezer, I found some "lost steaks" that were 3+ years old. I took them along on the move and about a month later pulled them out to toss out. Curiosity got the better of me so I defrosted them for inspection. They were fine, no freezer burn at all. End up inviting the neighbors over for a cook out.

One trick I learned years ago and still use because I buy in big bulk (half steer). To prevent getting meat juice on the bag's seal area and mess up the seal, I wrap each meat in "SARAN" wrap first. I found a beneficial side effect. Because the S wrap is flattened tightly against the meat and all air is squeezed out next to the meat, when I find a leaking bag, the meat has almost always been ok.

GT, one thing, be careful handling the frozen bags. It seems the frozen bags can crack and leak. I let them defrost first or run warm water over them first. I also check all newly bagged food bags one day later to ensure he bag seal is ok. As I reuse the bags, I find leakers every so often. Now I toss the bag after 4 uses. I date the bag on the top strip to cut off and put a stroke tally on the bottom strip. I also put important papers and such in bags, as well as clothing for my BOB.

Hunting Hawk is absolutely correct about the using mason jars with the sealer to store dry goods. If you store oxygen absorbers, use the smallest jar possible. From playing with the jars, I found only about 1/3 of the air is evacuated from jars. I always try to fill the jar so there isn't much room for air and thereby get rid of as much air as possible. Since the bags collapse around the food, they are almost perfect vacuum.
Have fun, you'll be surprised how many things you can do with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
725 Posts
Happy Anniversary! We'll celebrate 20 in Feb.

All great tips so far. Here's another. If you want to vac seal moist items (fresh caught fish), line a cookie sheet with wax paper, lay out the meat on the paper and stick in the freezer for a while (maybe a half an hour). This will partially freeze items and the vac sealer won't pull the juices into the mechanism.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,112 Posts
Congrats GT!!!! I have one and you can vac pack pretty much whatever you want. Just watch the seal. That seems to the short-coming of mine. I have to open the bag back up, then re-seal. It can be a pain in the ass. If yours has the extra vacuum/seal button, use it. I did find that a little pressure on the lid during the sealing part really helps. Hopefully though, yours just sails along! Also, save your bags. Just wash them out and re-use them. So be careful where you cut, as in as close to the seal as possible. You can boil, microwave frozen foods right in the bag too.
 
  • Like
Reactions: shotlady

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,123 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So far I've frozen some bulk pack steaks (raw) and some stuff the wife has made in the crock pot - odds and ends. I think I'm still learning and since most of the crock pot stuff is pretty liquid, the bags have been a challenge. You have to turn it sideways to seal it.

Tonight she made home made apple sauce. I turned some bags into thin tubes and made like a fruit pop out of them. Most of the cooked food I do, I try to do single serving sizes so I can freeze them and throw them in a cooler when we go camping. Mama's home cooking but far away.

So I think I need to get that attachment for mason jars and look for some different bags. A more pouch shaped small bag would be ideal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,218 Posts
I think I want one :) congrats on the long marraiges! I never looked up or back after my first one of 10 yrs. I didn't notice the time passing. I do now... but im more interested in getting a food sealer. :) how do you love it? lots of good hints going on here!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
I've had a food saver for .... OMG... I really don't know and unlike my dad, I still have my original unit and it is still going fine.

Here are my pearls of wisdom..

Always use the original food saver bags, the cheap ones really don't work. They are in value packs in Costco and they go on sale at least once a year for about 30% off

1. first bag you vaccume pack will often not seal right, the heat strip does need to be heated up, I usually burn a small piece warming up the unit before I really get serious sealing.

2. It is always better to have too much bag than too little, the bag seems to seal better when you use too much bag, if you cut the bags too short they often do not seal.

3. I love to seal my underwear, socks, extra gloves, etc in food saver bags in my bug out bag, less space, dry, who can ask for more?

4. If you seal home made jerky I would suggest cutting the ends off the jerky as the sharp points created during drying can puncture the bag.

5. Storing ammo seems like a waste, just get a surplus army ammo can, a lot cheaper and resealable.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,178 Posts
Congrats. I wrap meats in SARAN wrap first to prevent getting liquids/oils on the seal area of the bags. I found that as bags age, they develop cracks/pin holes. Now I put newly packaged foods into fridge/freezer for a couple of days to watch for leakers. By accident, I found SARAN wrapped meats are substantially less likely to freezer burn if the bags leak because the SARAN wrap is like a second skin. We are on third machine in 20+ years. If using mason jars (they work great) and lids, keep jar as full as possible. The vac saver basically works by pulling about 60% of the oxygen out of jar while creating the vacuum. So the fuller the jar, the less oxygen in the jar. If you're vacuum saving in a jar for super duper long time, you might want to add a small oxygen absorber or look at nitrogen purge of the jar. I started doing nitro purge on aluminized mylar bags + the oxygen absorber. If sealing sharp objects, try wrapping in paper towel, TP, thin sheets of poly foam packing material, etc. TP can be used later on. I also "SOFT" vacuum (sealed before the machine wants to) plastic bottles of liquids in case bottle leaks. I also vac seal my green backs for storage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
Congrats. I wrap meats in SARAN wrap first to prevent getting liquids/oils on the seal area of the bags. I found that as bags age, they develop cracks/pin holes. Now I put newly packaged foods into fridge/freezer for a couple of days to watch for leakers. By accident, I found SARAN wrapped meats are substantially less likely to freezer burn if the bags leak because the SARAN wrap is like a second skin. We are on third machine in 20+ years. If using mason jars (they work great) and lids, keep jar as full as possible. The vac saver basically works by pulling about 60% of the oxygen out of jar while creating the vacuum. So the fuller the jar, the less oxygen in the jar. If you're vacuum saving in a jar for super duper long time, you might want to add a small oxygen absorber or look at nitrogen purge of the jar. I started doing nitro purge on aluminized mylar bags + the oxygen absorber. If sealing sharp objects, try wrapping in paper towel, TP, thin sheets of poly foam packing material, etc. TP can be used later on. I also "SOFT" vacuum (sealed before the machine wants to) plastic bottles of liquids in case bottle leaks. I also vac seal my green backs for storage.
I totally agree, meat wrapped in plastic and then perhaps freezer paper is the 1st best cheapest way to preserve meat. Trust me I process and package several hundred pounds of raw flesh a year, paraquack has it figured out for low cost processing and I will do it the same way in the future.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top