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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't think it's so much the model year of the chassis so much as the mileage. A good chunk of those miles were kind of rough.

I'm one of those Vet's who didn't make it to his 20 yrs thanks to structural damage. As a result I have kind of turned orthopedic surgery into somethinbg of a hobby. Now you can't have this hobby without learning to master the art of physical therapy/rehab. I just turned 50 about 4 months ago and I had a knee replacement back in September of last year. Another chunck of titanium to go along with the shotgun slug looking chunks that hold my lower spine together.

I just don't remember healing up taking so damn long 20 or so years ago. I've had three back surgeries, 4 knee surgeries, a foot surgery, and a shoulder surgery. Now the knee replacement got a bit more complicated than the average removal of OEM parts and the installation of hot rod aftermarket parts in that once I got to recovery they hit me with some kind of synthetic super morphine and the next thing ya know pl' Rigged got real quiet for a couple of minutes while he popped in for a surprise inspection of the big bunker in the sky. Cost me 4 days in ICU and a couple of weeks or freaked out blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

The biggest side affect of this little cameo appearance on "The Lifestyles of the NOT Rich and Dead" was a set back in the early stages of rehab. Probably the biggest thing was a delay in strength excercises while we concentrated on range of motion and scar tissue. The one thing I was told to do was walk as much as I could. Now, my job is one that has little in the way of actual physical work, but I am on my feet for most of the day and I walk quite a bit.

When they told me to walk as often as I could while I was out from work, I took it to heart. Think Forrest Gump, but instead of running I walked. In fact, I walked too much and set myself back. Same thing when I got to work and was supposed to limit my time on my feet. Didn't listen then either.

So, it seems that what ever endurance or stamina I had befoer the surgery is just a memory. My body has fought the healing process battle admirably, for the most part, but damn it just seems to be taking forever. I have done a lightly loaded 10 mile walk just to see if I coiulod make it. I did it but my rate of advance was much slower than befoer the knee gave up the ghost. I guess in fairness, it was faster than the few months before the surgery though. The most notable thing to me was recovery though. Seemed to take a couple of days.

What the hell, you are probably wondering, is this all about? Well, lemme tell ya. Today after I finished all of my yard work in mid 90 temps I got the brilliant idea to go eliminate some impending Zombie Brush and weeds at one of my favorite getaway places. Two hours of swinging a machette in the heat and I'm done. Finished. This is a major concern when one considers throwing a 50 to 60 lb load out on, along with a rifle and pistol, and heading for your escape and evade route. It looks like I'm going to have to start planning on doing some weighted hilkes on a regular basis and ramp up the cycling time. I'm thinking maybe even joining the Y or someplace that has a pool where I can do lower impact excercises and swim. Running on a regular basis is not a great idea for me.

Oh ya, and the only non surgically repaired joint that went through the thump is my right elbow. I had it drained and shot up about three weeks ago. X-Rays showed bone chips and a major bone spur. None of which have ever really bothered me that much until recently. My two hour Zombie brush killing excercise has it pretty irritated with me. I need elbow surgery like I need another hole in the head. At least we know now to hold the spiffy synthetic super morphine happy shot.

It kind of gives me a new appreciation for the old saying, "If I knew I was gonna live this long I would have taken better care of myelf" lol.
 

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The older I get the better I was. I'm right there with you with the joint replacements. I got a knee and a shoulder done, back was broken in two places, pelvis in 4 places, and the right hip dislocated and broken in three places. The list goes on and on, I made it through a police academy and the Federal Law Enforcement Training center by trashcans full of ice at night and lots of grit. My job keeps me in shape but it gets tougher and tougher everyday and it's a young man's game. I'm in a lot of pain most everyday but I found that moderate exercise and a good diet is key to staying in the game and avoiding a lot of the pain and stiffness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You will find as I did that a 20 lb load works out much better.
I've got two 45 mile legs if we have to ever walk out. I'm not seeing 20 lbs as enough gear for it, even though I do have a cache at the midway point.

If I have to walk out I seriously misread the tea leaves.
 

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The older I get the better I was. I'm right there with you with the joint replacements. I got a knee and a shoulder done, back was broken in two places, pelvis in 4 places, and the right hip dislocated and broken in three places. The list goes on and on, I made it through a police academy and the Federal Law Enforcement Training center by trashcans full of ice at night and lots of grit. My job keeps me in shape but it gets tougher and tougher everyday and it's a young man's game. I'm in a lot of pain most everyday but I found that moderate exercise and a good diet is key to staying in the game and avoiding a lot of the pain and stiffness.
I keep telling people this: I'm just too damn old to be a commando. Walking out will be an issue for me mostly because of one bad knee and too fat to go too far. I had back surgery in my mid 30's and now just have occasional muscle problems. I didn't used to be this bad until my current job has me sitting behind a computer the majority of the day.
 

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I am not nearly as physically capable as I was when I was 20. But now I have a lot more things on my side that would probably give me better odds of surviving a TEOTWAWKI event.
I have much greater skills, mechanically, electronics, gardening, shooting, medicine, and just general survival skills. Plus I have all the necessary tools and equipment.
Possibly one of biggest advantage being 60 instead of 20 is that you realize you aren't indestructible. I would take much greater precautions for things like infections and avoiding injuries. I do need to start getting into shape again and probably loose some weight but I do have decent endurance.
 

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I'm "almost" a very daunting individual. 6'4" tall and 210 pounds very lean and mean, my wife likes it when we travel to big cities with her as I have great situational awareness and the physique to back it up.

That being said I have pains in places at 52 that menace me daily. I work a farm, before that I worked furniture and daily threw around pieces twice my weight.

My point is F*$# you I will never go under a knife to replace something GOD gave me to use till death do us part. If the URSA doesn't kill you, the doctors most likely will, plus the down time for "healing up" which makes me love the hitches in my giddy up. Don't even get me started on scar tissue!

You will live a lot longer putting up with the pains life gave you and a shot of Jack than you will trusting those butchers that put metal in place of bone!!!

Rant off
 

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Saves lots of money/time once you admit your going to "have" to stay and not bug out. More cash for food, supplies etc and not waste it on BOV's, and BOL.
 

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I ain't as good as I was either, but I'm as good once as I ever was. In fact, I am better than I used to be in many respects. I'm more cautious, capable, and self-sufficient. I can plow a field all day long, I can catch catfish from dusk till dawn.
 

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I'm 67 and I am stronger than I was a 21 but my stamina is way off. It takes me much longer to recover from injury.
 

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I keep telling people this: I'm just too damn old to be a commando. Walking out will be an issue for me mostly because of one bad knee and too fat to go too far. I had back surgery in my mid 30's and now just have occasional muscle problems. I didn't used to be this bad until my current job has me sitting behind a computer the majority of the day.
As a sup I'm stuck behind a desk way more than I like. Knees suck and of all my injuries, the knee has given me the most problems. I have had 4 surgeries on it total and it looks like the right knee will next with it's first surgery.
 

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Time gets us all. I still do PT. I figure it got me this far why stop. My 2 mile is still under 12 minutes max out push ups and sit ups truth is I can beat most half my age at PT. The problem is doing it over and and over like I once did.
Years of pushing, broken and torn up shoulder, broken ribs, broken clavicle ect this stuff never goes away it just goes into hiding and comes back once in awhile just to remind you.
I am not the soldier I once was, for more reasons than just wearing down body. The motivation I once had has faded.
Yep not done yet, still bring a lot to the fight but it is not the same man showing up that once did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Smitty, I think there is a mind set that is hardwired into us that never goes away. That mind set that the mission is not finished yet, to hell with physical issues or no sleep,

I hear ya on the motivation. That's what part of my OP was really about. I used to approach a physical set back as a tactical problem to over come and set about solving the problem as quickly and efficiently as possible. These days it just seems harder to do that but at the end of the day you find a way. The end of the days just hurt more than they used to...
 

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Pfft. Sure, I've had a few repairs and am carrying a few parts that don't need blood and won't rust, but they'll just give the anthropologists something to look at in a few centuries. As for now, they are allowing me to do what I wouldn't be able to do, otherwise.

And, no; I am not as fast as I was, or as strong as I was. That's OK. Hard-headedness has filled in the gaps, and the drive to excel helps, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Pfft. Sure, I've had a few repairs and am carrying a few parts that don't need blood and won't rust, but they'll just give the anthropologists something to look at in a few centuries. As for now, they are allowing me to do what I wouldn't be able to do, otherwise.

And, no; I am not as fast as I was, or as strong as I was. That's OK. Hard-headedness has filled in the gaps, and the drive to excel helps, too.
I figure when some ol' boy with a bugle plays my final taps they can just recycle me, lol.
 

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I probably would be in a care facility if I had not had my two surgeries. The first one restored the use of my right arm and the second got my right lung working and took care of the loss of feeling in my left arm. I gained a few pounds while I was unable to do anything but I kept eating like nothing had changed. Today I am better than I have been in the last eight years. I stopped using pain meds other than aspirin and I occassionally have some muscle spasms but I am able to breathe and lift more than ten pounds. I can walk at three miles per hour for two miles and I am increasing that. I fully intend to get back to my fighting weight, ba able to walk at 5 mph again for at least fourteen miles and get my strength back to where I can lift a couple hundred pounds without dying. Those were the things I was doing eight years ago on a daily basis. I waited until I was more afraid of losing my arm and the ability to breathe before I went under the knife. I knew that back surgery has a poor record for recovery but when I made my decision it was to get back to where I was before the accident. I have been told that I would probably never regain what I have already done. Doctors don't know what guts and hard work coupled with real intent can do. With the grace of the creator, the help of my wife, and a bit of work, I know I can completely recover and get back the strength I once had. I guess one would say I am determined to get there and only God can stop me and I think He is on my side.
 
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