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For me the most scary scenario is to wake up in the middle of the night, temperature in the 20s, and see that my house is on fire. No time to think about what do I grab, other than my wife. So how would you prepare for this emergency? WHat would you have ready to fight the outdoor cold? And what would be essential to have if your house burned so bad you could not get back in?
 

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Record of serial numbers, financial info off site, I keep a disk at my dad's. Blankets in your car, a set of key hung on the frame with a wire tie so you can use it. Your car is instant shelter until you can do something else.
 

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For me the most scary scenario is to wake up in the middle of the night, temperature in the 20s, and see that my house is on fire. No time to think about what do I grab, other than my wife. So how would you prepare for this emergency? WHat would you have ready to fight the outdoor cold? And what would be essential to have if your house burned so bad you could not get back in?
I live on the 3rd floor and keep this rope in the corner of my room next to that rucksack which contains warm clothes, trainers, waterproof jacket, phone numbers and cash etc, so when the smoke alarm goes off I'll tie one end of the rope to a heavy table leg and sling the other end into the street and climb down it with the ruck on my back, everything should go smoothly unless I accidentally hang myself, then I'll book into a cheap hotel for the rest of the night, I'm in the city centre and there are half a dozen within a mile..:)

 

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I dunno what your budget is but here is an idea I came up with.

- like someone mentioned you need a copy of all your important docs/ records
- you probably want some cash
- you probably want a copy/extra of a credit/ ATM card
- You might want one of those cheap prepaid phones
- flash light(s) and lantern with extra batteries
-small battery powered radio
- change of clothes
-a little food and water

All that I would throw in a BOB and have it always ready to go

If you have a budget you could rent a small storage unit someplace (probably could get one for around $75 a month)
There you could keep things like
-a cot or air mattress
-extra blanks and clothes/coats
-extra food and water
-some kind of heater (maybe propane)

From there you could decide your next steps if your home was completely destroyed. If you don't have a vehicle you could use the phone to call a cab to take you the storage location.

If you have a good sized vehicle you might look into a small camper or something that you could pull behind your car. That could replace the need for the store area. You'd also be mobile!
 

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Sterns Survival gear has what we call a bunny suit which is generally worn under a drysuit. They are great for keeping warm in almost any cold weather, as long as you wear something over it to keep it dry. Polypropeline under wear and your ready for almost any cold. The polyprops wick your sweat off your body, a dry outer layer keeps out the snow etc, and that bunny suit will keep you happy and warm. I've actually worn the drysuit, bunny suit and polyprops in Lake Erie in the ice, and never felt cold. If you pack them tight, each can be packed into a bag that you keep by your bed. Unless you expect to actually become submerged, a mustand jumper is a great one piece stay warm outfit, which can also be packed tight. The mustang has bouyancy, but does not keep your feet warm or seal up as tight as a drysuit. For most operations a drysuit isn't necessary, and would require you and your wife practicing putting them on, as they are not that easy the first couple times. If you wear the polyprops and the bunny suit under a good outer layer of what you otherwise wear and you should be alright.
 

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i back up my computer to a sky cloud. take photos 1x a month and email them to my self. hotmail. call up to usaa 100 deductable its all covered. even my ammo hoard lol my policies are uploaded to sky drive. im pretty square. fire, though, id have to save my pussy cat. shes a mean assed cat, bites my kids, but shes mine. and id save my beretta fs92. thats my macaroni picture, something ill keep for ever.
im not sure i could live a day not being armed. and the weather only gets to be about 50-60 at the worst here.
 

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I made a car disaster bag, living in iowa it gets ****ing cold, so I made a video of what i have in it right now....I have it in my car, parked across the street and keys on my night stand so if something like that happens i can get the hell out super fast! Here's the youtube of it....
 
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Incidentally I forgot to mention that before I shimmy down that rope from my 3rd floor apartment I'll empty a fire extinguisher into any fire that breaks out, but if it doesn't put it out, I'm gone down that rope without a second thought because it's a rented apartment and I'm certainly not going to stick around to try to save the place for my landlord!
That's the advantage of rented accom, if it burns down it'll be the landlords financial loss and hassle not ours, we can simply go and rent another place..:)
 

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Have another location to flee to 400 feet away. Another thing is have taken are to prevent fires in the first place. Take out the arson and the true number of house fires in low. Winter has many threats but we also live it so we are ready for it.
We have many ways out. Just not to concerned . We weather 20 below with power out for 3 days before. Weapons would survive any fire they are protected an not all one one place.
We live in the country Fire, police and emergency service of any kind are not what others get . handling things like this are part of our everyday life. Escape ladders are common my Kids did drills with them when they were 4 years old in the old house. Everyone here can get out different ways blind folded. Yes they were test growing up. Burn it to the ground life will go on
 
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I've skimmed over the others and forgive me if this has already been said but I'll take a stab.

They make an emergency rope ladder that you keep by your window if you are up on second or higher floors.

emergency ladder.jpg

Fire extinguishers in each room and everyone knows where they are located, as well as smoke AND carbon monoxide detectors. The cost of all this stuff is high $30-$50, so plan to buy one with each paycheck or every other paycheck and before you know it you'll have all rooms taken care of.

A towel behind the door to put so smoke doesn't come into the room. If you really want to get technical, have a flower vase with water or a fish tank or something with water in your room so you can soak the towel as well.

Gas masks. Keep under the bed, thats where mine are. Practice before you have to use it, can take up to 30 minutes for some of them to learn how to use.

As someone has mentioned, keep a set of keys for your car outside away from the house. If possible, park your car away from the house instead of a garage (can prevent carbon monoxide as well as a safe haven for you to go during a fire), keep a BOB in there and emergency solar blankets (marathon blankets etc).

If possible, and if you have the $ to do it, put a spicket about 50-100 feet away from your house (like farmers use) and have a heavy duty water hose ready just in case. Could help some if its a little fire.

Metal roof in case on the 4th of July some kid shoots a bottle rocket onto your roof. There is also an interior/exterior finish called NO-BURN that you can apply on areas that might be vulnerable to catch fire (cabinets above stove, mantles, area around wall heaters etc).

Above all, be sure that you don't leave cigarettes, candles or the stove burning without watching it. Keep electric cords in good working order and not pulled taught. Have timers on other electric devices that shut off devices when not in use.
 

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... then I'll book into a cheap hotel for the rest of the night, I'm in the city centre and there are half a dozen within a mile..:)
Umm.... I'm confused by your response, LuckyJim. You'd walk an entire mile to get to a cheap hotel? Surely there's at least one pub that closer. :)
 
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