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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Assuming you have become proficient with your weapons of choice, how often do you feel you should practice and how many rounds would you fire per practice session?

Let's break it down into categories;

1. Shotgun

2. Pistol

3. Tactical type rifle with iron sights or non-magnifying optics (red dot, green dot, T-dot, etc)

4. Precision scoped tactical or hunting type rifle

I'm very interested in hearing your thoughts on this. If you want to add other categories, (bow, crossbow, black powder, spear, ICBM, or whatever, please do) Thanks.
 

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Wesley is right but then I'd multiply by 6 not 4.

To me there are two points to consider. The first is obtaining a comfort level of proficiency that is the best you think is feasible. This might equate to a "break in" period and it might take a lot of rounds or a few. I am not yet comfortable with my M1A and have only fired 80 rounds. I just got 200 rounds that I am to start using for this purpose very soon. With my Lapua I wanted to hit a certain "kind" of target at a certain range - that was the only reason I wanted it. It took me 21 rounds to get there. (that's about $100)

After you gain that proficiency you need to figure out what you need to keep it. That balance you have to keep up with on routine in training. I plan to fire the Lapua about 4x a year and about 5 rounds each time. I currently shoot an AR-15 about 300 rounds a year, 9mm's about 600 rounds a year, 357's (2 (lever/revolver) about 300 rounds a year and I probably go through 2000 rounds of 22LR a year - though I'm backing off on that right now due to prices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am proficient with my weapons, which (to me) means...

1... I can load, unload, cycle the action, and engage or disengage the safeties on the move without looking.

2... I can almost instantly recognize and apply the proper corrective actions to common failures such as; fail to feed, fail to fire, and fail to eject

3... I can hit what I am aiming at a reasonable percentage of the time.

"Proficiency Step 1" can be gained without ammo. It's not possible, really, to predict how many rounds it would take before seeing enough common failures to be able to clear them... too many variables. I've seen people who can pretty much pick up any weapon and hit with it, and I've seen people who can't seem to hit the side of a barn from inside the barn, no matter how much they practice. So let's look at this assuming you have the proficiencies and concentrate on ammo requirements for maintaining those proficiencies.

Ripon, thanks for the data you provided. Would you be so kind as to break it down a little? Do you shoot once a month, once a week, every 3 months, or what? If not, that's cool too, the numbers you gave will help.

I'm curious to see what others think too. :)
 

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Shooting is like riding a bicycle, you don't forget. I zero rifles I use once a year. I familarize with the pistols I use about once a year, maybe a box of 50 each 9mm, 40 S&W and .45 ACP. If I planned to be in a gunfight I might be more dilligent. I plan to run from any fight if I can.
 

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The OP makes the assumption that one is already proficient. (It takes years of shooting, thousands of rounds, and professional guidance to be proficient IMO.) As such, for me I can maintain my proficiency as follows: Shotgun - 25 rounds in the spring and 200 rounds in the fall (hunting). Scoped hunting rifle - 5 rounds per year on average. 3 to check sight in and 1-2 for an elk. 10 years/9 elk. Non-scoped rifle - 200-500 rounds per year. Pistol - By far most difficult to maintain proficiency - 1000 rounds per year easy.
 

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Firing more than 100 rds a day usually has diminishing returns.(Jerry M the revolver guy fires more than that but unless you won the Powerball...) Think out your practice in advance. Decide the skills you want and the level of proficiency you need.Frequent practice trumps marathon practice unless refer back to powerball.
 

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I look at stored ammo differently, it is a tangible asset that can be quickly converted into cash, and it even has a decent yield over the years.
I think it would be very difficult to put an actual number of rounds a person should shoot for training, because it depends a lot on the person and the gun and the combination of the two.

Some USPSA shooters shoot 100,000 rnds a year.
 

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I want 2000 rounds per battle rifle regardless of sights. (7.62x39, .223/5.56, 7.62x54R)

500 rounds per handgun

500 defense rounds for 12 gauge, 500 bird shot, turkey loads etc..

100 or so for my scoped deer rifle. Most of that the premium Nosler stuff.

I generally only train once a month. This is just on hand. I have varying amounts for range use. I never dip into the back stock.
 

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There are some people who are born shooters, and there are people who despite the strongest of desires can never raise above a level of adeqaute no matter how many rounds they send down range.

Initial profiency takes as many rounds as it takes. For some a few rounds with a new weapon and they are there. Others may take a 1000 round or more. After that, I also support the more frequent, less round approach is way better than than 8 hours of mayhem with a thousand rounds. It sure is fun to do though::rambo::
 

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I have eastern starlings in my pole barn nesting.
I bought a 100 round box of 12 gauge #6 1oz. steel expert skeet rounds.
Apparently I need more practice to shoot these damn birds.
These rounds are terrible or I am one of the two.
I have bumped the birds off the cow fence at a 100 feet with the wad and they get up and fly away.
 

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I've came to the conclusion a long time ago, I don't have ice water flowing through my veins, so, I figure if I know my weapons well enough to operate them in my sleep, then maybe, maybe I won't hit the mag release instead of the safety in a real life situation.
But then, if I pull out my pistol and it still has the holster attached, then dump the mag on the ground, perhaps the bad guy will die laughing?
 

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Let's break it down into categories;

1. Shotgun

2. Pistol

3. Tactical type rifle with iron sights or non-magnifying optics (red dot, green dot, T-dot, etc)

4. Precision scoped tactical or hunting type rifle
1. Two boxes - 50 rounds

2. Eight mags of .45 (101 rounds); eight mags 9mm (160 rounds)

3. Ten mags 5.56 (300); five mags 7.62 (100 rounds)

4. 100 rounds of 7.62 and 100 .223

I shoot once a month at least. My range bags hold exact amounts with pre-loaded mags.

I focus mostly on 5.56 semi-auto, and on shooting the bolt-action guns.

Shotgun I focus on reloading, shot patterning and slide actuation.

Pistol I work on double taps to the torso and one shot to the head.

Semi-auto carbine I work on mag changes, clearing malfunctions, and shot placement. I go for consistent head shots.

Bolt guns I shoot for groups. I focus on shot placement and cold bore one-shot accuracy, most important for hunting.
 

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It is better to fire 5 rounds well in a controlled and accurate manner than it is to fire 100 rounds building bad habits.

You always have to start with the basics. Breath control, grip, sight alignment, target aquisition, trigger control, follow through.
If you practice that with each gun five times a day your shooting will improve. (unless your gun is in poor condition)
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Verteidiger, I think I love you! LOL

Yeah, that's roughly my plan. I keep my training ammo separate from my "rainy day" stash, shoot about once a month, and my training regime and yours are fairly close. I also like to shoot on windy days, rainy days, and when it's snowing, because you never know.

DrHenley, the range I usually shoot at is part of a tactical training school. They do a lot of IDPA stuff, and have a separate area dedicated to it. They change this every few weeks, so it's always something new. I haven't entered any events, and am moving soon so might never get the chance... at least not at this range.

I typically shoot:

Shotgun... 5 rounds per month, sometimes 10 (the shotgun is designated as my GF's primary home defense weapon, she shoots 15-20 rounds a month)

Handguns... I've been shooting a 1911 style .45 for well over 30 years. I usually shoot about 10-50 rounds a month. My GF shoots about the same with her .40 S&W. We also have 2 .380 autos which I don't bother with at all because they are basically pointless.

5.56 mm carbine... I shoot about 120 rounds a month, the GF maybe 30 per month.

7.62mm bolt gun... I have shot 60 rounds in the last 2 months, but this is a new gun and I consider that its break-in. I will probably only shoot about 5 rounds per month. My GF better not go near the damn thing, at least until that "new gun" smell goes away. LOL She will learn to shoot it though, probably 5 rounds a month.

I also shoot about 100 .22LR a month just screwing around, the GF does about the same.

As far as "rainy day" stash...
100 X 00 Buckshot, 50 #6 (12 ga)
100 X .380, jacketed hollow points
100 X .40 S&W, jacketed hollow points
200 X .45 ACP, jacketed hollow points (I think I have 100 X FMJ Ball stashed somewhere too)
600 X 5.56 mm, 55 Gr FMJ + 400 X 62 Gr Green Tips (FMJ with a steel penetrator)
500 X 7.62 mm, mostly 165 Gr with Sierra GameKing SPBTs
2500 X .22 LR, mix of 40 Gr solid and 32 Gr hollow points

:)
 
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