Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious. If necessary, how long would your stored food last? What about growing food? Livestock? Do you have methods to replenish? I have sustainable methods, gardening and livestock in addition to my stored supply and enough land in my area to hunt/fish. What do you have in place?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
496 Posts
Roughly, considering grocery store food and freeze dried emergency stores, not counting the refrigerator, I am maintaining a four month supply. As we live in a small town house with only a small patio space and from March to through September it's too hot to store in the garage so we are limited what we can store in the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
I am bugging out but I have lots of seeds and a lot of good places to grow on the BOL plus mre's and everything else, plus I have a lot of places to hunt/fish even small animal traps. snares etc

My BOB can maintain me and my daughter and wife for 7 days bare minimum and thats comfortably (helps that my baby is breast feeding too) It wieghs 85lbs alonethan the wife has a smaller BOB as well
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
At the moment, 6 months for my family of four, mainly canned goods and freeze dried. Heirloom seeds from my garden for continuous production. Plenty of canning equipment, salt, dehydrator and a smoker. Local hunting spots. Large lake 5 minutes walking distance away for fishing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,643 Posts
2 years but first growing season after winter we will grow far more than we need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
I would say about 8 months.i live in an apartment but I have about half an acre for a yard.i havent started yet but I plan to start gardening this summer. Im also planning to buy couple of chickens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
I keep enough for a year for two people long term, lasts 25 years or more. However short term 5 years or less shelf life probably another 2 years in just my daily pantry. This is stuff we eat normally that doesn't need refrigeration until opened and in some cases not even then. All is based on no other source but do have seeds and such that can be grown at anytime.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
I would say minimum of 2- years worth. Plus the freezer is full and canning can be done with most. We have a big garden every year to replenish. We do eat from this stock and replenish accordingly. We also live in the country with a lot of wildlife or hunting. Hubby is an avid hunter. There is livestock also...... Also a few freeze dried cans of extra...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
My wife and I grow about 80% of what we currently eat. The 20% that we don't grow is lunch meat, and snacks. As for food stored. We have several hundred pounds of root crops, grains, and other harvested items.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
887 Posts
I would say about 8 months.i live in an apartment but I have about half an acre for a yard.i havent started yet but I plan to start gardening this summer. Im also planning to buy couple of chickens.
Geese make good lawnmowers as well if you want to go for more then just chickens. They lay eggs are somewhat territorial. So not a bad bird to have around if you have land. Get a couple breeder Australian heelers. If I can get that off the ground then Ill find me some breeder pits as well.

My last project was to get everything Id need and have it prepped for removing my honey bee hive and taking it with me if my Bug In spot became nonviable. Good thing its winter atm so I could get a good location on where the bees are nested up at. It would be a bit unpleasant getting then out in summer. Im curious if it would be advantageous to get them into a beehive like the farmers use. The white box now while its winter and there docile.

I know Im late starter to being prepared but I am making progress every day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Geese make good lawnmowers as well if you want to go for more then just chickens. They lay eggs are somewhat territorial. So not a bad bird to have around if you have land. Get a couple breeder Australian heelers. If I can get that off the ground then Ill find me some breeder pits as well.

My last project was to get everything Id need and have it prepped for removing my honey bee hive and taking it with me if my Bug In spot became nonviable. Good thing its winter atm so I could get a good location on where the bees are nested up at. It would be a bit unpleasant getting then out in summer. Im curious if it would be advantageous to get them into a beehive like the farmers use. The white box now while its winter and there docile.

I know Im late starter to being prepared but I am making progress every day.
Dont move bees until spring, and the nectar flow. If you disrupt them now you could have a huge die off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
887 Posts
Dont move bees until spring, and the nectar flow. If you disrupt them now you could have a huge die off.
Thanks I know I got some homework to do on this one. I just see the usefullness of a beehive as a landowner/gardener. Its worth its weight in gold and a little bit of pain to keep safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Thanks I know I got some homework to do on this one. I just see the usefullness of a beehive as a landowner/gardener. Its worth its weight in gold and a little bit of pain to keep safe.
Bees are really easy to keep. They cost abit get to started but well worth it. A single healthy hive will produce about 40lbs of honey a year that you can harvest. Its best to start with at least two hives. That way if you have one doing better than another you can "borrow" honey from the healthy hive and give it to the weak hive.

Bees are a lot like fish, they less you mess with them the happier they are. When you do mess with them, be efficient and do everything at one time.

I love my girls, and love the honey they produce, we keep 6 hives and only harvest enough honey for us to eat (roughly 20 lbs a year total)
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top