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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seriously, I need a strong reliable log splitter and would like your input. Getting too old to rely on the ax. Our sons are grown and out of the house and last year I herniated some discs in my lower back and don't want to go through that again. Anyway, I look forward to your suggestions and hope I didn't offend anyone's sexuality.:roll:
 

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There is a manual hydraulic one at Harbor freight and Northern tool. I do not have one but I have looked at them, I like the fact that you don't need gasoline for them. I am only in my 40's and still able to swing the maul and hammer, but I can see the future in which I will no longer be able, and I have difficulty asking for help if there is any way I can avoid it. Maybe someone on here has tried them and can let us know.
 
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A 4 x 24 cylinder and a 2 stage pump, . . . a 6 HP gas engine, some hoses, and an oil tank and you are in business if you have a 6 foot I beam.

I built mine 30 or so years ago in about 2 days, . . . with a cheap Lincoln welder, . . .

You can certainly buy one, . . . but for me, . . . I'd rather build.

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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Gas, electric, or manual can all be done. For the manual splitter you can use a "jack screw" or a long lever. The lever would be the fastest and if the lever is long enough there won't be much effort to it. The "jack screw" will likely be the slowest but takes very little effort. The gas powered ones are fairly fast but you have the maintenance and fuel to keep them operational. The electric ones are quiet, a bit slower (usually) that gas but you don't have the maintenance or fuel complexities. They don't work well if the power goes out - which is when you might need it most.

You could get a gas or electric and mount the complementary motor so you have both gas and electric.

Harbor freight is probably the least expensive but I will caution you not to buy their least expensive model of anything - they are not typically reliable and fail quickly compared to the next model up.
 

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We bought one at Lowes about 15 years ago. It has been flawless until my papaw ran it without oil. We replaced the engine for about $300 and it is in top shape again. I just looked at their site and they have doubled in price, we only paid $799 when we got ours. I don't know if your willing to pay that much, but it sure has saved our backs. Maybe you can find one in your area that is used for cheaper. Good luck in your hunt.
 

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You could go another route and encourage entrepreneurship in your neighborhood... any teens looking to buy a car live around you???
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Would gladly pay some young men to chop some wood but we live over a mile down a dirt road from the closest neighbors who are elderly country folk...sadly most young kids today are weak pussies anyway and I wouldn't trust most of them around sharp objects. Most young people couldn't take their eyes off their cell phones long enough to be worth a shit anyway.

Been chopping my own wood for all of my life, and think a multi-ton splitter sure would speed things up. Still can use the ole ax and maul splitter but not at the same rate of speed. Have researched the splitters at Northern Tool, Tractor Supply, DR, and Swisher. Most are around $1500. Might end up renting one twice a year or so.
 

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i like electric nice and quiet
 
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I do have a hi lift jack rigged up to split wood if there is no power slow but works great
 

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i like electric nice and quiet
I agree! If you want noise then get an attachment for your shotgun to split logs with or use the correct amount of high explosives.

(there that will light up the guys at homeland security and the NSA)
 

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I don't have a current budget figure for my home made splitter, . . . the pump (2 stage from TSC) was about a hundred bucks, the cylinder about a hundred and a half, lever from Northern tools I think was a hundred, hoses will be in the 50+ range, and I used an old freon tank for the oil tank.

I welded it all together, . . . looks like a cobbled up mess, . . . but it will literally shear willow into pieces, . . . and of course hickory, elm, oak, pine, ash, maple, cherry and walnut all go through it without a hickup. Sometimes a burl will cause the pump to go to the second stage, . . . but it will cut the burl like a dull knife.

It has a 6 hp Sears roto tiller engine.

Just some food for thought, . . .

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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Plain and simple, build your own. It will be stronger, more reliable, and cheaper than ANYTHING that you can buy. That's what I did.
 

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I decided to purchase a manual hydraulic splitter. It cost me $149 at Sears, on clearance on Black Friday.

Had to special order it for ship to store free delivery but it was a short wait.

Came in a box I could carry to my pickup; loaded it on a shopping cart.

It uses a 10 ton house jack to split the wood. Has a long handle to extend the pump stroke so you don't have to pump for long.

Splits wood just fine, but it is not as fast as a mechanical driven pump.

But I can split wood and not wake anyone up, too.

Me and my dog, a cup of coffee, a lawn chair, and my splitter. I can split enough wood to fill the wood box on the screened porch and barely break a sweat.

Tows behind my lawn tractor (riding lawn mower) or my ATV/SxS. Stores vertically in the shed.

I used to rent but $70 for four hours - I paid $149 and can take my time.

I am still in good enough shape to use a splitting maul if all I want is a campfire, but if I drop a big tree damaged by lightning, the manual hydraulic works better because there are so many sections to split.

One thing - be sure to measure your opening for the log section. Mine prefers wood that is 16" to 18" and 20" binds up.

I use a scrap 2x4 cut to 15" to mark the log with spray paint and cut the section. Fits like a champ.

And it fits perfect when stacking or adding a log to the fireplace.

The unit has wheels to raise it up about a foot off the ground. Not visible in this picture, but my model had wheels and a ball hitch....

http://m.sears.com/index-g.html#/details/guest/SPA10484S3197146601?source=Online
 

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The other less attractive option to consider is a pellet stove instead. I don't personally like the idea of relying on shipments or purchase of fuel, but I know some people who have gone the pellet stove route for heating their homes and they are incredibly efficient. You could set back a pretty good pile of fuel depending on your storage setup. I know a guy who had an entire corner of his basement filled with them... probably 8ft wide, 4 feet deep and 4 feet high...

Just an option to consider depending on your budget...
 

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The other less attractive option to consider is a pellet stove instead. I don't personally like the idea of relying on shipments or purchase of fuel, but I know some people who have gone the pellet stove route for heating their homes and they are incredibly efficient. You could set back a pretty good pile of fuel depending on your storage setup. I know a guy who had an entire corner of his basement filled with them... probably 8ft wide, 4 feet deep and 4 feet high...

Just an option to consider depending on your budget...
4x4x8 is considers a "cord" of wood, I realize a cord of pellets is a LOT more wood than I am talking about but in my area you will need SEVERAL 'cords" of wood to be reasonably comfortable SHTF. IMO buy a real wood burning stove and a Steel chainsaw and you will be a lot better off.

FYI I just got a pair of chainsaw chaffs in the mail last week, I have never used them in my 1000+ cords of wood cut but SHTF I don't have the emergency room to go to "IF" I should have a accident.

I got them on ebay for about $40
 

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I know it'll be expensive, but you might want to look at splitters with log lifter to position log to be split on the wedge beam.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Looked at pellet stoves but I have lots of acres of renewable resources mainly in hardwood trees. In the SE US temps are pretty moderate so I don't need tons of split wood. I have settled splitter to buy in the spring when they go on sale. I appreciate y'alls input!
 

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I like to split by hand, faster and a good workout. I understand the fellows complaint about his back and would suggest one of these splitting maul as 99% of the time they are one hit splits. Plus when you split your wood is also important. Let it season for a bit before splitting so save yourself some back ache.
 

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If I was making a log splitter I would use a sequence valve to tie the cap and rod ends of the cylinder together and set it at 500 psi to use regenerative feedback back for the initial stroke then once under load the sequence valve would switch hooking the pump to the cap end and relieving the rod end. That way the initial rod travel could be many time faster then the power stroke and if the logs were small enough it may not even need the power stroke. Probably have a working pressure of 1800 to 2000 psi.
 
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