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I'm thinking about adding one to our BOB. HOw many of you folks have one? What make and model? Thanks, JR
 

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Garmin all the way I have an older GPS 60 csx with tropo maps installed and the newer Oregon 400t. They are the almost perfect SHTF map making device. With one of these you can make your own map in a forest using animal trails , creeks or old roads. You really need to check out some of the GPS sites to see what they are capable of. After having several I will not get another one unless it uses an Sirf 3 chip set.
 

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My 1st one when they came out was a Magellan. Since then I have owned nothing but Garmin. Outstanding product. I have had more than a few over the yrs and now own 3.
 

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I also use a Garmin handheld. It gives you topography maps, marine maps, and highway maps, all upload-able and update-able online once you register the device with Garmin.

Great for boating and hunting, as well as traveling.
 

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Hell dude I have an OOOOOOLLLLLLLD Garmin GPS12 that I picked up from ebay that still functions just fine, in fact I remember putting it on my bedroom outside window ledge and then punted the lat and long into maps.google and it pointed at a spot in my house less than 6 meters from the spot it was resting.

Now it was a glorious sunny day and that helps with accuracy.

The unit is not one with any sort of maps in it, but being an old marine unit and the fact that I can read maps means it works just fine for me I dont feel the need to 'upgrade' any time soon. Also its built SOLIDLY so it should last me a while :)
 

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garmin rino 655t and I love it use it all the time I work in the bush a lot on hydro dams and electrical substation from cost to cost in Canada some of the places we go are a few day drives or fly in camps and it has never let me down ( I don't use it for work just bring it with me so when I'm Dunn my shift I can go explore) but as good as it is I never go in the bush ever with out a hard copy map I don't trust any thing that has a motor or runs on batteries
 

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i heard the hand held GPS aren't as acurate as one would like in a BOB situation but a good compass read is always effective and the reason we put a really good quakity one in our survival boxes eash month our prescribers feel it's a great tool if lost for sure along with tons of other cool items check this site out it's best way to be prepared at all times and really cool factorials in box as each month let us know yall thoughts we love feedback from serious outdoorsman http://joinbugoutbox.com[/URL]
 

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i heard the hand held GPS aren't as acurate as one would like in a BOB situation but a good compass read is always effective and the reason we put a really good quakity one in our survival boxes eash month our prescribers feel it's a great tool if lost for sure along with tons of other cool items check this site out it's best way to be prepared at all times and really cool factorials in box as each month let us know yall thoughts we love feedback from serious outdoorsman http://joinbugoutbox.com[/URL]
I don't know who you are talking to but a modern hand held gps is very accurate. I can use the GPS 60csx anywhere in the Red-river gorge area in Ky and get a fix even under the arch. I can bushwhack then use the tracking on the gps to find my way back. I have 4-wheeled and hiked all through the forest around red-river gorge where the roads and paths are not on any map and by saving the tracks I have my own personal map.
There is a new hobby or sport called Geocaching where you try and find little treasures that people hide using a gps. Most modern GPS will take you withing 25 feet of a spot you previously marked. Look how long it took them to find the Titanic and they had the best mapping equipment on board and sent out there position. If they had a GPS they would know where it went down within a few feet. Try making a trail on a map using a compass and map. With a hand held gps all you need to do is turn it on and it will record your path plus even give the elevation. I always take a gps with (topo maps) with me when hiking. With a gps I could take an ammo box and hide it anywhere in the woods and give position on the geocaching site and someone would find it. To find your position with a compass relies on you being able to find two recognizable points on a map which isn't always easy.
 

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I don't know who you are talking to but a modern hand held gps is very accurate. I can use the GPS 60csx anywhere in the Red-river gorge area in Ky and get a fix even under the arch. I can bushwhack then use the tracking on the gps to find my way back. I have 4-wheeled and hiked all through the forest around red-river gorge where the roads and paths are not on any map and by saving the tracks I have my own personal map.
There is a new hobby or sport called Geocaching where you try and find little treasures that people hide using a gps. Most modern GPS will take you withing 25 feet of a spot you previously marked. Look how long it took them to find the Titanic and they had the best mapping equipment on board and sent out there position. If they had a GPS they would know where it went down within a few feet. Try making a trail on a map using a compass and map. With a hand held gps all you need to do is turn it on and it will record your path plus even give the elevation. I always take a gps with (topo maps) with me when hiking. With a gps I could take an ammo box and hide it anywhere in the woods and give position on the geocaching site and someone would find it. To find your position with a compass relies on you being able to find two recognizable points on a map which isn't always easy.
How do GPS's work? Satellite signals.

How long will the government/private companies be able to maintain satellites in orbit if/when the grid goes down? Not very long. You might be able to use the GPS to get to your BOL, but expecting GPS's to work for much longer than 6 months or a year is unrealistic in my opinion.

To me, if you're worried about navigation, you are worried about long term grid down situations. If you are worried about long term grid down situations, a GPS is going to be useless.

Get to know your BOL and the routes to get there now. If satellites fall out of the sky, I'd rather have a pair of night vision goggles than a GPS... but that's just me.
 

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A GPS will still be very useful if you cannot get a signal.....mark all your locations that you need and store in memory....you can take those coordinates and relay to a map and use a compass.....GPS's have many useful features even if satellites are down....
Yes even without the GPS satellites you would have a device that have all the road maps of the entire usa stored or tropo maps and possibly both. Many GPS also has very accurate electronic compass that can work in any position. When talking about what will and won't work in any situation is just a guess as there are unlimited scenarios of what can happen and you could say what would happen if the magnetic poles start to shift which has happened before then a compass would become useless and a GPS would still work best to have both and know how to use both. But as long as the gps system is up I will use a hand held gps.
 

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A GPS will still be very useful if you cannot get a signal.....mark all your locations that you need and store in memory....you can take those coordinates and relay to a map and use a compass.....GPS's have many useful features even if satellites are down....
I don't know. I don't see myself traveling a whole lot further than 5 to 10 miles away from my BOL in the case of a grid down situation. When you look at prepping through that prism, knowing your location and the general layout of the nearest town or two is much more important than a GPS IMO.
 

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And if you have to leave area ? will you just wing it ? or would having something that can you can use to plot a course and travel be helpful ? IF you are truly prepping you would have a plan to move from your BOL if the situation dictates.....
That assessment depends on your BOL doesn't it? My BOL is nearly 500 acres, and I know the vast majority of it like the back of my hand. If I had to, I could probably go months without seeing another soul and still never leave family property. There are 3 water sources on the property and plentiful game. I don't foresee any incentive to move on from that.
 

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I mean sure, I've still got some work to take care of out in the woods incase the cabin is overrun, but who doesn't still have work to do???
 

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I have the Garmin 76CSx handheld GPS with color screen.

Handheld GPSs are incredibly accurate for navigation. You can get a WAAS enabled model that can pinpoint your location to within three feet.

Mine has an altimeter and electronic compass, and runs on AA batteries.

It can download maps of any city and guide you turn by turn.

On water or in the deep woods you use waypoints and simply backtrack on the same path to get home, or use the nav features to circle back using an alternate route or shortcut, so easy when you learn how.

I really like mine.
 

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My first thought on GPS is yes it could be useful but it's no substitute for orienteering using a map and compass. I wouldn't rely on a GPS as my sole method of finding my location. I have an older Garmin eTrex that works well and I use it when hunting but anytime I take it I also have a map and compass in my pack just in case. GPS is great for marking waypoints or stand locations but in any sort of bug out scenario there is always the possibility that it will fail so a map and compass and knowing how to read them is essential.

-Infidel
 

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I agree with you, Infidel. Anything with a battery can go kaput. I also use a map and compass, as backups and for double checking routes, as well as for planning purposes.

I also use a laser rangefinder with inclinometer. And yes, I know how to use a slope doper, an angle cosine indicator, and how to range with mil-dots, all of which are equally essential if you hunt or shoot long range. But a rangefinder is faster and does all the math for you.

I know how to add and subtract with pen and paper, too, but I prefer a calculator.

Just another tool in the tool box, but if your chainsaw croaks, a true prepper always has a hand saw to serve as backup.

I use my GPS if I have to leave a kill in the field when I am hunting. Sometimes dark closes in, and you don't have time to quarter and pack your kill out - unsafe terrain after dark. So I mark a waypoint and return to the kill at dawn the next day, and don't lose meat to the coyotes.

It also can find me a bank ATM, or an Italian restaurant on the road. Pretty versatile.
 

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Sorry to ask but would a backpacking GPS do just fine? I assumed you must be referring to GPS systems of that sort.

-Frank
 
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