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There are many things one can find on the internet. But what if the power goes out for whatever reason? Things are bad and no access to a gunsmith or the internet.

I'm a believer in having paper books for when online searches are not possible. Are they any books you would recommend for basic gun repairs?
 

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The NRA firearm assembly books for rifles and handguns.

I bought the whole set of the books from the NRA many years ago,(The Firearms Classics Library) Gunsmithing by Roy F. Dunlap is pretty thorough without being too technical. Nice set of books actually, leather bound, acid free paper.

There's about 130 books in the whole collection, I have about 15 of them.

https://djmcadam.com/firearms-classics-library-html
 

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Sorry, I have not written it yet.:devil:

Go to a night class in machine shop to start.

I know that is not a book, but the machining knowledge is invaluable in that respect.

You want to be a parts swapper? you don't need it then.

But being able to make the parts that are not available is a whole different story.

Example; had to make a main spring and a stirrup for a Volcanic pistol, cost the owner $600.00.
 

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Reminds me of an auto sear. Not sure where I got that idea.
Not even close, it is a bolt stop.:tango_face_wink:

Why is it that people think if you can make parts you must be converting guns to FA????

Can't tell you how many people over the decades wanted me to convert assorted guns to FA, answer was always NO.

Most common one was the semi auto Thompson, next was the AR.

Can I convert them? SURE if they are self stuffers, but I will not.

I am about to make some spare small parts for one of my MG's, perfectly legal, none are available for it other than used ones.
 

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Not even close, it is a bolt stop.:tango_face_wink:

Why is it that people think if you can make parts you must be converting guns to FA????

Can't tell you how many people over the decades wanted me to convert assorted guns to FA, answer was always NO.

Most common one was the semi auto Thompson, next was the AR.

Can I convert them? SURE if they are self stuffers, but I will not.

I am about to make some spare small parts for one of my MG's, perfectly legal, none are available for it other than used ones.
I wasn't trying to imply anything, when I lived back east buddy had a FFL and several different FA's. Some days we would take a look inside to see what was what. That was over 30 yrs ago, just reminded me of something I saw once.

They are fun to shoot and waste ammo but wouldn't have one for serious use.
 

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The gun digest assembly/disassembly books are the ones I would consider most important. If you are mechanically inclined you can probably figure out what is wrong, but being able to put them back together, especially some of the more complicated or unusual designs can be tricky.
 
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The gun digest assembly/disassembly books are the ones I would consider most important. If you are mechanically inclined you can probably figure out what is wrong, but being able to put them back together, especially some of the more complicated or unusual designs can be tricky.
I have had different guns brought to me over the years in a box, just parts to be re-assembled.

Some I have never seen before, took some time but did them all, some guns needed some parts that were missing or broke.

Right now the parts are scarce for fighting rifles, I looked at APEX the other day for a Galil barrel, none.

Most other parts were gone also, FAL parts the same, AK's too.

It seems along with ammunition, everyone has bought up all the spares out there that are important, coming SHTF anticipation????
 

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I have had different guns brought to me over the years in a box, just parts to be re-assembled.

Some I have never seen before, took some time but did them all, some guns needed some parts that were missing or broke.

Right now the parts are scarce for fighting rifles, I looked at APEX the other day for a Galil barrel, none.

Most other parts were gone also, FAL parts the same, AK's too.

It seems along with ammunition, everyone has bought up all the spares out there that are important, coming SHTF anticipation????
Without the book it will likely take hours or days, with it will take minutes, especially if you are missing pieces.
 
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Without the book it will likely take hours or days, with it will take minutes, especially if you are missing pieces.
After doing them for over 65 years, I don't think so, I just use the parts schematics for ordering parts.

If needed to I could just use the schematic for assembly, but then it is no challenge.

I have never needed a book for doing them.

I have a routine for putting together those I have not done before.

In my opinion all you do need is the parts schematic for assembly, they show where every part goes.

You can get them from Gun Parts Inc, or pull them off their site.

I have been at this longer than most of you have been alive.

Example: detail stripped a 1911 in 1955 along with PO-8's, assembled M-14's in 1957.
 

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Good to have hard copies of service manuals for all your firearms. Even just IPLs are better than nothing.

Same goes for cars/trucks/tractors.......most any mechanical device.

The "box of parts" that @SOCOM42 mentioned brings back memories............I worked at a motorcycle dealership a few summers while in college. We would get a query of "how much to rebuild a XYZ that has a bad crankshaft?" , then they would come in with a box full of filthy parts (dirtbikes!). Kids would just take things apart without even cleaning off the grime first. Most of the boxes had missing or "extra" parts.
 

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After doing them for over 65 years, I don't think so, I just use the parts schematics for ordering parts.

If needed to I could just use the schematic for assembly, but then it is no challenge.

I have never needed a book for doing them.

I have a routine for putting together those I have not done before.

In my opinion all you do need is the parts schematic for assembly, they show where every part goes.

You can get them from Gun Parts Inc, or pull them off their site.

I have been at this longer than most of you have been alive.

Example: detail stripped a 1911 in 1955 along with PO-8's, assembled M-14's in 1957.
Good for you. Most people do not have that level of knowledge, the fact that you don't need the book does not help someone else. The OP asked a question, I answered it with an honest answer of what I feel would most help the average person. I really don't care what you can do, or know.
 

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If you have service weapons the USGI manuals are available. Not gun smithing per se but details servicing/maintaining the weapon.
 

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Good for you. Most people do not have that level of knowledge, the fact that you don't need the book does not help someone else. The OP asked a question, I answered it with an honest answer of what I feel would most help the average person. I really don't care what you can do, or know.
If you look, I suggested the parts diagram for use, I have read some of the "how to books",

there is not enough paper to print all the variables within one gun.

My first posting suggested a night class in machine shop, learn the basics of what goes into making them,

like reading a mike, running a tap or die, how to remove a broken screw.

I have a friend and my brother who have zero mechanical aptitude, nothing is going to help them with any repairs,

neither can even field strip a 1911.

Here is a how to book for you, the M14 Shop Manual, by Jerry Kuhnhausen, this is a detailed book for a specific rifle.

The book question is far to variable for a true simple answer, good you named some for him,

I went in a different direction to come up with a solution, learn some basics as the lowest denominator,

some people don't know a wrench from a hammer.

There are plenty of people here that have asked me questions mostly in PM's about gun problems, 99% got an answer they could use.

Final, why should you give a shit as to what I know? you shouldn't,

I don't care if you do or don't, if you did there would be something wrong with you.
 

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If you look, I suggested the parts diagram for use, I have read some of the "how to books",

there is not enough paper to print all the variables within one gun.

My first posting suggested a night class in machine shop, learn the basics of what goes into making them,

like reading a mike, running a tap or die, how to remove a broken screw.

I have a friend and my brother who have zero mechanical aptitude, nothing is going to help them with any repairs,

neither can even field strip a 1911.

Here is a how to book for you, the M14 Shop Manual, by Jerry Kuhnhausen, this is a detailed book for a specific rifle.

The book question is far to variable for a true simple answer, good you named some for him,

I went in a different direction to come up with a solution, learn some basics as the lowest denominator,

some people don't know a wrench from a hammer.

There are plenty of people here that have asked me questions mostly in PM's about gun problems, 99% got an answer they could use.

Final, why should you give a shit as to what I know? you shouldn't,

I don't care if you do or don't, if you did there would be something wrong with you.
I agree you need basic knowledge of mechanics as a foundation. I got started with lawnmowers and dirtbikes. Then cars/trucks/farm equipment.

In high school we had metal fabrication and power mechanics courses with a great instructor. Lots of stuff still useful to me today: gas/electric welding, soldering, forging, lathes, bridgeports, measuring tools/tolerances, casting metals, gasoline and electric motors,.........

Besides the basic knowledge you also need the proper tools for the job at hand. For guns start out with the tools just to clean and maintain each firearm. Then get specific tools needed for each arm. Many tools will be useful in general: measuring tools that you may already have, quality screwdrivers big and small, brass and steel drifts, drills and bits, taps and dies, files, vices, presses,..........

Here is a useful PDF for M14/M1A, @SOCOM42 might add useful comments? :tango_face_wink:

Contains a good trick on how to use a 30-06/270 Win case to take down the bolt.....
 

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