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Discussion Starter #1
Ok

I may be a snob prepper but I am at least a smart one.

I currently have 75lbs of green coffee beans in storage.

Unroasted Colombian Supremo - Coffee Bean Direct

Truthfully I haven't roasted any of them yet but from watching Utube videos how hard can it really be?
 
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It is not hard, but look into a rotisserie cylinder that goes on any BBQ. That makes it easy.

Here is a rub though. I envision you well hid out in the hills of Montana. You start roasting and I'm likely to catch wind of it in NV. That scent carries big time.
 

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Ok

I may be a snob prepper but I am at least a smart one.

I currently have 75lbs of green coffee beans in storage.

Unroasted Colombian Supremo - Coffee Bean Direct

Truthfully I haven't roasted any of them yet but from watching Utube videos how hard can it really be?
It is easy as hell and the results are FAR better than anything you can buy. We just use a deep cast iron frying pan. I have 50 lbs of the Colombian Supremo in storage (from the same company you got yours from). Then I discovered their Espresso Blend. It is about the same price, maybe a bit cheaper (by the 25 lb bag), but holy crap is that stuff good! I have another 50 lbs of that and will be buying a bunch more since it keeps forever without any special packaging in the unroasted state.
 

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Got to agree with Ripon on this, unless you can come up with a way to control it, that scent will carry a long way.
 

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Ok that is it 2100 and I getting a cup of coffee.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Sorry for the late reply but I had 2 new year resolutions, 1 was to roast my green coffee beans so I did it on Jan 1

I decided to roast them on my barbeque external burner since I heard they smoke a lot and the temperature got above 20 degrees so I figured I could do the 20 minute roast easy in my sweat pants and my house slippers, haha was I wrong.

Ok for my first roast I had read that 50% setting on my burner was optimal but it became very clear into the roast that at 18 degrees it was not hot enough. So after suffering through my first crack in very cold weather I turned up the temperature on the burner to try and recover my roast.

So after about 32 minutes I finally took the beans off and they were not as well roasted as I was hoping for (lower temperature equals lighter roast) but the coffee was really good

Day 2

I did the next roast the 2nd day at a higher temperature and got the whole batch done in about 20 minutes which is about normal.

My point is to experiment, the longest cook for coffee beans isn't the best for most peoples taste, some people like it less roasted and a lighter feel.

IMO this isn't a hard process, with very little practice or over a variable heat source you can still get a reasonable roast and in any case better coffee than you can buy.
 
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Montana Rancher - still waiting to hear about the roaster thingy your wife gave you. I think it was an almond roaster??
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It is not hard, but look into a rotisserie cylinder that goes on any BBQ. That makes it easy.

Here is a rub though. I envision you well hid out in the hills of Montana. You start roasting and I'm likely to catch wind of it in NV. That scent carries big time.
I totally understand you thoughts about opsec, however my thought is to roast coffee as an ambush in the early days...
 

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Montana Rancher - still waiting to hear about the roaster thingy your wife gave you. I think it was an almond roaster??
yes and it works GREAT, just like her so why should I be supprised?
 

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I do stock coffee , but except the fact that long term I will have to go with out. One of the things I will really miss.
Sitting here now getting some work done. in the forum also. Cold out side.
Fresh pot of over priced very good HD coffee. Life is good.
 

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I purchased a bottle of Green Coffee Bean Extract at my local Whole Foods Store and although it contains 50% chlorogenic acids and each capsule is 400mg Green Coffee Extract, other ingredients are: Silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate (vegetable source) and cellulose. Capsule consists of hydroxypropymethylcellulose. No wheat, no gluten, no soybeans, no dairy, no egg, no fish/shellfish, no peanuts/tree nuts. Do these “other ingredients” make the pills less successful for weight loss?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I purchased a bottle of Green Coffee Bean Extract at my local Whole Foods Store and although it contains 50% chlorogenic acids and each capsule is 400mg Green Coffee Extract, other ingredients are: Silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate (vegetable source) and cellulose. Capsule consists of hydroxypropymethylcellulose. No wheat, no gluten, no soybeans, no dairy, no egg, no fish/shellfish, no peanuts/tree nuts. Do these "other ingredients" make the pills less successful for weight loss?
How does it taste, full roast or...

hehe
 
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Discussion Starter #15
Montana Rancher - still waiting to hear about the roaster thingy your wife gave you. I think it was an almond roaster??
I had a lot of fun roasting today, the weather was above freezing and so I decided to have some fun, I missed or ignored MrsInor's question about what I use so here it is

Amazon.com: Back to Basics Nut Roaster: Kitchen & Dining

After a LOT of different roasts my wife basically tells me if they are not black I should just dump them out (which means the French roast way past the 2nd crack)

That's ok cause I like it too, not that my opinion matters much on this point....

I purchased a cast iron propane burner as my barbeque burner really doesn't do the job if the temperature is low, plus I can do it in the garage now instead of the back (exposed) deck.

Also today the garage smells GREAT!
 

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I had a lot of fun roasting today, the weather was above freezing and so I decided to have some fun, I missed or ignored MrsInor's question about what I use so here it is

Amazon.com: Back to Basics Nut Roaster: Kitchen & Dining

After a LOT of different roasts my wife basically tells me if they are not black I should just dump them out (which means the French roast way past the 2nd crack)

That's ok cause I like it too, not that my opinion matters much on this point....

I purchased a cast iron propane burner as my barbeque burner really doesn't do the job if the temperature is low, plus I can do it in the garage now instead of the back (exposed) deck.

Also today the garage smells GREAT!
I am really surprised more preppers (and non-preppers for that matter) do not roast their own coffee. It is so damn easy and way better than you can buy.
 

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I am really surprised more preppers (and non-for that matter) do not roast their own coffee. It is so damn easy and way better than you can buy.
Me, too. Once you taste fresh roasted coffee there's no turning back. With the longer storage life of green coffee and it's value as a barter item it makes pretty good sense to learn to roast.
Any home roasters out there who want to up their game a bit and increase their output may want to consider converting a gas grill to a roaster using an RK Drum. I've roasted over 30 tons of coffee using an original Ron Kyle 5lb drum. I still have it and use it for sample roasting since I've upgraded to a larger machine. I also will figure out a way to run it if the balloon goes up.

While I'm talking about it, I can't resist posting a pic of my current rig.
bvg_pluto1.jpg
Now, THAT'S a roaster! :p
 

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Me, too. Once you taste fresh roasted coffee there's no turning back. With the longer storage life of green coffee and it's value as a barter item it makes pretty good sense to learn to roast.
Any home roasters out there who want to up their game a bit and increase their output may want to consider converting a gas grill to a roaster using an RK Drum. I've roasted over 30 tons of coffee using an original Ron Kyle 5lb drum. I still have it and use it for sample roasting since I've upgraded to a larger machine. I also will figure out a way to run it if the balloon goes up.

While I'm talking about it, I can't resist posting a pic of my current rig.
View attachment 4377
Now, THAT'S a roaster! :p
That is freakin' awesome Jack! :D
 

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That is freakin' awesome Jack! :D
At the risk of sounding a little proud, she is pretty awesome indeed.

Her name is Plutonius and she's a 1931 Jabez Burns & Sons Model 7R. The last of this model built and one of only 4 that we've been able to find still operating in the US. She is what's referred to as a 1/2 bag roaster which means her capacity is 1/2 of a standard 132lb sack of coffee, or 66lbs per batch.
Jabez Burns is known as the father of modern coffee roasting as his designs, with their increased efficiency and control, revolutionized the industry and elevated roasting from a trade to an art. Some unique features about her is that while modern machines use a tray for cooling, Plutonius utilizes a cooling drum meaning that the beans are protected and enclosed from start to finish. A definite plus during stinkbug season around here. She is also one of very few machines that has an integrated de-stoner (the contraption you see on the back with the eagle on top). Nowadays that is a separate and costly piece of equipment.

Of course, none of this has anything to do with prepping.....but thank you for letting me brag a bit! :lol:
 

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At the risk of sounding a little proud, she is pretty awesome indeed.

Her name is Plutonius and she's a 1931 Jabez Burns & Sons Model 7R. The last of this model built and one of only 4 that we've been able to find still operating in the US. She is what's referred to as a 1/2 bag roaster which means her capacity is 1/2 of a standard 132lb sack of coffee, or 66lbs per batch.
Jabez Burns is known as the father of modern coffee roasting as his designs, with their increased efficiency and control, revolutionized the industry and elevated roasting from a trade to an art. Some unique features about her is that while modern machines use a tray for cooling, Plutonius utilizes a cooling drum meaning that the beans are protected and enclosed from start to finish. A definite plus during stinkbug season around here. She is also one of very few machines that has an integrated de-stoner (the contraption you see on the back with the eagle on top). Nowadays that is a separate and costly piece of equipment.

Of course, none of this has anything to do with prepping.....but thank you for letting me brag a bit! :lol:
You should be proud! Plus, you have obviously forgotten more about this subject than I will ever know. My high-tech equipment consists of a cast iron fry pan with 3 inch deep walls, a bakers whisk and a couple colanders. Please give us whatever advice you can as this is something that not only improves our lives post-SHTF, but now as well. That is a BIG deal to me, and I expect a few others hanging out here.
 
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