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We just saw the crisis in Texas, with the massive power outages, and busted water lines, etc.

So here is the question for all of you: How would your prep have held up under those conditions?
 

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I would have been largely okay because I have water stockpiled in jugs. I replace it every year or sooner (I shoot the old bottles or take them camping.)

I also have a habit of stockpiling propane and butane. In the southwest we have not been able to have open campfires in the mountains for several years now so I actually have a cache of propane and butane stoves. I also make sure to keep an extra tank of propane for the BBQ. Every time I'm in Wallymart I grab a few bottles of butane...the wife never notices the extra cost since they're only about $2.50 each.

And since I snow camp a lot, I have a ton of cold weather gear for the family.

I would use the pool water to flush toilets and clean dishes.

My biggest issue would have been keeping the bottled water from freezing.
 

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We were in the middle of it and we came out ok. We didn't have to go to the store, good thing because friends sent pictures of empty shelves. Trucks couldn't get in either to restock either. Gas stations were all closed.

We lost internet for a couple of days. Cell phones were spotty at best but most texts went through.

All in all, we lacked for nothing.
 

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If what happened in TX happened here, I would be sitting pretty good. My biggest issue would be only having 5k of water for the week. While that seem like a lot, I have 6 horses.
Time to get a gen hookup on the deep well pump! That will bump me up to Level 4 of my emergency plan.
My wife worked on a horse ranch her parents owned in Colorado Springs area. Every winter was a frozen Hell. Just keeping the ice broken so that the horses could drink was a task in itself. Still, this was the norm.
What hit Texas was not the norm. Texans had no idea such a thing would hit them. Were this to happen in South Alabama, we'd be just as screwed. The Dothan area doesn't even know how to spell snow plow.
 

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My wife worked on a horse ranch her parents owned in Colorado Springs area. Every winter was a frozen Hell. Just keeping the ice broken so that the horses could drink was a task in itself. Still, this was the norm.
What hit Texas was not the norm. Texans had no idea such a thing would hit them. Were this to happen in South Alabama, we'd be just as screwed. The Dothan area doesn't even know how to spell snow plow.
California wouldn't either but I spent most of my life in WNY. I get snow at my elevation 3 times a year, but by 10am it's gone. I have had to chip ice twice this year
I would have had power to 6 circuits, heat, pressure pump, internet, some lights and some plugs off my propane line. Pretty darn comfy for Level 1 emergency.
 

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My wife worked on a horse ranch her parents owned in Colorado Springs area. Every winter was a frozen Hell. Just keeping the ice broken so that the horses could drink was a task in itself. Still, this was the norm.
What hit Texas was not the norm. Texans had no idea such a thing would hit them. Were this to happen in South Alabama, we'd be just as screwed. The Dothan area doesn't even know how to spell snow plow.
People in the north tend to make fun of southerners about snow. Snow isn't hard to drive in. What we tend to get more often than not is ice. I don't care what part of the country you are, driving on ice is nearly impossible. Ice is the reason for the 100 car pile up in FW. That was pure ice. On ice all vehicles become giant sleds. Stopping on your own is not an option. Pump the brakes or slam the breaks, neither will make a difference on ice.

The north has snow plows and snow removal equipment stored for each winter. We have none as it is rarely needed here. In the south all you have to do is mention the words snow or ice and everything shuts down. My wife won't even get out of bed.
 

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People in the north tend to make fun of southerners about snow. Snow isn't hard to drive in. What we tend to get more often than not is ice. I don't care what part of the country you are, driving on ice is nearly impossible. Ice is the reason for the 100 car pile up in FW. That was pure ice. On ice all vehicles become giant sleds. Stopping on your own is not an option. Pump the brakes or slam the breaks, neither will make a difference on ice.

The north has snow plows and snow removal equipment stored for each winter. We have none as it is rarely needed here. In the south all you have to do is mention the words snow or ice and everything shuts down. My wife won't even get out of bed.
My wife will be the only one at her workplace to call in late for work. And send a pic of the snow. And we are 6 miles due east of her workplace, just 1500 ft up.
 

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I’m well prepared for a “Texas event” and it would not have bothered us here in the least. Well, except for loss of cable and internet. I have water in storage and on site, heat with a coal stove, two generators, and plenty of food and fuel. No problems here.
 

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Would have had zero effect on us or those nearby.. Not like we have not gone a week with out power and other services before. Even a week of 25 below water comes up at 55 degrees.
 

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Didn't notice a thing no problems.

We've been driving on ice covered roads for the last couple months. Using a 2wd Ford F150 and a Dodge rwd hemi Charger, with out chains. Finally are starting to see tar again after at least a month. We are hoping by March but suppose to get snow again today.
 

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We weathered the blizzard of 1978 in Boston. We were lucky that we didn't lose power or heat. That was when I started thinking more about prep. When we moved out of the city, we moved into a house that had a good fireplace and kept a good supply of firewood. When we moved to PA, we bought a house that had a good wood stove in the addition - and kept 2 1/2 cords of wood. A tank of oil would last most of the season because the wood stove did a great job of throwing off heat. Now we live in a larger house and have a whole-house backup generator. I keep food supply and have water filters and carboys as well as bottled water. We could weather a Texas situation for a while if necessary.
 

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Mine did fine. Prep for hurricanes and not a deep freeze but it worked anyway.
 
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Talk about a TEXAS sized mess! This has been an eye-opening event! I have been prepping for 10 years and still not prepared for a mess like this. Our home is total electric so if this happened here we would be in for a hard time. First step would be to drain the water lines and water heater (prevent freeze damage). 2. We would move the garage propane heater inside the house and use it to chase the night chill. (use only when we are awake) 3. Bring the sleeping bags inside the house and use them for additional insulation. 4. Bring the gas grill inside the garage and use it to cook food. 5. Use the Colman stove to boil water or make coffee/tea. 6. Use the camping water filter to filter pond water or river water. 7. Melt snow in the bathtub to flush the commode. 8. Use the generator to operate a convection space heater. (the generator would stay outside the house).
 

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We live in the NE, I have prepped for that kind of weather all along,

would not have had any problems if that weather came here.
 

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A week or two of below freezing temps without city water, electric or gas wouldn't have been a problem. Beyond a few weeks and heat would be an issue. We have a small wood stove and just enough firewood for a few weeks. We have two 20 lb propane bottles with a propane radiant heater and a couple of camping stoves that would help out. ...and an oxy/acetylene welding rig in the garage that might come in handy.

If there was a heavy overcast for two weeks solar power would be an issue. I have a small generator but only a limited supply of gas for it.
 

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Yup, one of the biggest parts of prepping living in NE is being prepared for cold weather almost half the year.
 

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I think we would have been fine. Keep lots of food, water, meds on hand. Have a fire place and enough wood to last a while.
I guess what I learned from seeing this is to expect the unexpected. Crazy things happen.
 
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