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For price of seed tapes I can buy several ounces of carrots and beets that lasts me several years. I plant nantes and danvers carrots, detroit red beets.

For carrots try this. Plant your rows of carrots in a shallow furrow and inter space radish seeds every foot or so. The radish will germinate faster and shade the carrots which need to stay moist to germinate and take much longer. The radish also mark the carrot rows. As the radish get edible the carrots will be established, and you can pick the radish. Then start to thin the carrots.

Worst problem I have with carrots is keeping ALL the nearby weeds plucked until the carrots get established. Well, that and animal pests........
Grasshoppers completely decimated my early planted carrots this year. I did manage to get some late carrots out of my Green Stalk tower. I did still get some damage on the tops, but not that much.
 

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My carrots took an unusually long time to germinate this summer. Then we were into the dry season. Long story short...... I did a lousy job of thinning and that’s on me. So I grew tons of tiny-tiny carrots and a few nice ones mixed in. My mistake! I already ordered some seed tapes and I’ll probably try the toilet paper idea listed above. I’m always up for trying a new garden experiment.
 

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I was cleaning up garden this week as getting snow tonight. Dug up potaoto, beet, and carrot.

I always leave in some beans and lettuce for seed. Cut off the lettuce stalks and hung to dry, also harvested bean pods. Have blue lake bush, and kentucky wonder and scarlet runner pole bean seed. These will be for a few years down the road as I have seed from the last two years also. Not enough of the scarlet runners for dried beans food.

Also harvested some asparagus seed from two different varieties. I've not grown asparagus from seed, except what seeds itself in the beds. I noticed some baby asparagus coming up this spring so will give it a try encouraging the seeds. Takes 3-4 years from seed until you can harvest.

I forgot to grab some rhubarb seed. I think they have dropped all the seeds?

I still have immature broccoli and cabbage growing. Covered them with a few layers of lumber tarps. After a few days of freeze/snow, weather will get warmer again. We'll see if they head up or not?

Kale is up and growing from seed I harvested this early summer from last years kale (biennial) . Seems to be very viable seed and I've got lots left over. It's a great variety that stays green under the snow. I might put a cold frame over some of it. We've had the variety since I was a child, don't know history of the variety, but know it's right for my climate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #84 ·
I was cleaning up garden this week as getting snow tonight. Dug up potaoto, beet, and carrot.

I always leave in some beans and lettuce for seed. Cut off the lettuce stalks and hung to dry, also harvested bean pods. Have blue lake bush, and kentucky wonder and scarlet runner pole bean seed. These will be for a few years down the road as I have seed from the last two years also. Not enough of the scarlet runners for dried beans food.

Also harvested some asparagus seed from two different varieties. I've not grown asparagus from seed, except what seeds itself in the beds. I noticed some baby asparagus coming up this spring so will give it a try encouraging the seeds. Takes 3-4 years from seed until you can harvest.

I forgot to grab some rhubarb seed. I think they have dropped all the seeds?

I still have immature broccoli and cabbage growing. Covered them with a few layers of lumber tarps. After a few days of freeze/snow, weather will get warmer again. We'll see if they head up or not?

Kale is up and growing from seed I harvested this early summer from last years kale (biennial) . Seems to be very viable seed and I've got lots left over. It's a great variety that stays green under the snow. I might put a cold frame over some of it. We've had the variety since I was a child, don't know history of the variety, but know it's right for my climate.
What does the kale look like? Large roundish curly/frilly leaves??? Or long thin dark green leaves? Oak-type leaves with red tinge?
 

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What does the kale look like? Large roundish curly/frilly leaves??? Or long thin dark green leaves? Oak-type leaves with red tinge?
Closest to the Red Russian or Winter Red (more so) pictured. The leaves stay tender even when they get big. Just cut the main spine out.

I'll try to get a picture if we don't get too much snow. I just got my Nikon fixed so I can get quality pictures again
 

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Chickens and turkeys love grasshoppers. Turn the hoppers into eggs and meat!
Because we split our time between two homes at the present, animals are out of the question for now. Same thing for bees. I would love to have both, but the timing just isn't right.

I would have had the fattest chickens imaginable this year. My garden was completely overrun. The grasshoppers not only ruined my carrot crop, they also ate every brassica seedling they could find, i.e. all of them.
 

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@Steve40th

Heirloom and/or open-pollinated varieties produce seed that carries the characteristics of the parent plant, provided you control pollination. Some hybrids produce sterile seeds, but even if the seeds aren't sterile, you can't predict the characteristics of the offspring plants. They could be inferior in terms of disease resistance, eating quality, keeping quality or general vigor. Or they could be fine. There is, as I said, no way to know.

Calorically dense crops include all the root crops plus shelling beans and winter squashes.
 

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In the old days (during the Great Depression) people would save the seeds from the fruits and vegetables off their tables to plant in the spring. Free seeds. Not a bad idea.
In the old days, fruits and vegetables on the table were almost surely from open pollinated varieties. You could trust you were getting seeds that would produce true. Today's supermarket produce is almost undoubtedly 100% hybrids, bred for a superior ability to survive being shipped long distances. Even if those seeds produced true, the result would be inferior to what you could grow with open-pollinated seeds. Better than nothing in a pinch, but better to be prepared.
 

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In the old days, fruits and vegetables on the table were almost surely from open pollinated varieties. You could trust you were getting seeds that would produce true. Today's supermarket produce is almost undoubtedly 100% hybrids, bred for a superior ability to survive being shipped long distances. Even if those seeds produced true, the result would be inferior to what you could grow with open-pollinated seeds. Better than nothing in a pinch, but better to be prepared.
That and GMO stuff. Monsanto will go after you if you try to plant seeds as it's "patent infringement".

Those SOBs even went after a farmer that used his own corn seed. They claimed the nearby GMO fields pollinated his corn and they had rights. I'd have counter sued for pollution.

This is the Monsanto GMO corn that tolerates "roundup". It's in all the food supply (along with the roundup/glyphosate): corn oil, corn meal, ........
 

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That and GMO stuff. Monsanto will go after you if you try to plant seeds as it's "patent infringement".

Those SOBs even went after a farmer that used his own corn seed. They claimed the nearby GMO fields pollinated his corn and they had rights. I'd have counter sued for pollution.

This is the Monsanto GMO corn that tolerates "roundup". It's in all the food supply (along with the roundup/glyphosate): corn oil, corn meal, ........
Possibly with the GMOs. Most GMO crops in the U.S. are destined for animal feed.
 
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