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I mean...we don't have a local lumber store, There's a Home Depot an hour and half away. LOL. I have tarps here that I could use for that; I could try it next summer, but I would have to sacrifice growing space. I wouldn't keep that outside the fence becasuse of snakes. I will think on this.

I've been adding organic fertilizer to my compost tumblers and I believe that's why I have a whole tumbler of finished compost.
Water the stuff HEAVY now, put down some nitorogen, pizz/shit is better, cover, let the worms work......see what happens spring
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Typical woman. :)

I'm surprised you can get ham hocks & collards way out there. The sugar & vinegar aren't really necessary but I like it. The vinegar helps cut the fat from the hocks & the sugar balances the vinegar. Make sure you don't have too much liquid as it will water down the pot liquor.
:armata_PDT_27:

Yes, both have been around for years. I just don't remember the hocks being so expensive. I'll usually buy them two or three times during the winter for a pot of beans & cornbread, and it's just about that time again.

I even know of a store that sells chitterlings, fresh pig ears & tails (not the dried dog treats), tripe, frog legs and some other 'southern delicacies'....and those things I'm like @paulag1955...not gonna happen
 

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Good Lord woman, where do you live... the Sahara? :)

On the good side, bet you don't have much issue with plant pests & disease.
LOLOL!

I garden in the shrub steppe of eastern Washington. I know most people who have never been to Washington or who have only visited the Seattle area think of it as being a mass of trees where it rains all the time, but the Grand Coulee area only gets about 12" of annual precipitation. About the same as Tucson, Arizona. But unlike Tucson, where most of the precipitation comes during monsoon season in the summer, we get most of our precipitation in the winter. My husband is from Arizona, and eastern Washington reminds him of home. Except, of course, that it gets very cold here in the winter. And our rivers run above ground.

And, correct, no fungal type diseases. Grasshoppers, though, which is another thing that lowered my yields this summer. I lost almost all my carrots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
LOLOL!

I garden in the shrub steppe of eastern Washington. I know most people who have never been to Washington or who have only visited the Seattle area think of it as being a mass of trees where it rains all the time, but the Grand Coulee area only gets about 12" of annual precipitation. About the same as Tucson, Arizona. But unlike Tucson, where most of the precipitation comes during monsoon season in the summer, we get most of our precipitation in the winter. My husband is from Arizona, and eastern Washington reminds him of home. Except, of course, that it gets very cold here in the winter. And our rivers run above ground.

And, correct, no fungal type diseases. Grasshoppers, though, which is another thing that lowered my yields this summer. I lost almost all my carrots.
Does it snow there in the winter? I realize there isn't much rain, but many areas in Eastern Wa do get snow, and even hard freezes (which does produce some moisture).

As MT said to water it well then cover it to help hold in the moisture, those tarps might be a good idea, as it will help hold in the heat and it will also create condensation.

Get the worms at Walmart in a fridge in the sporting goods section or a fishing tackle/bait shop......but for the worms to stick around & do their job, they need fed with garden waste, poop, leaves & whatnot
 

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Does it snow there in the winter? I realize there isn't much rain, but many areas in Eastern Wa do get snow, and even hard freezes (which does produce some moisture).

As MT said to water it well then cover it to help hold in the moisture, those tarps might be a good idea, as it will help hold in the heat and it will also create condensation.

Get the worms at Walmart in a fridge in the sporting goods section or a fishing tackle/bait shop......but for the worms to stick around & do their job, they need fed with garden waste, poop, leaves & whatnot
Yes, there is snow, but it's included in that 12" of annual precipitation. I think it's too late for me to try for worms here. Not enough time to make a trip to Walmart, which is an hour and a half to two hours whether I go north, south, east or west. Oh. Wait. Now that I think about it, they may have bait at Coulee Playland. I wonder if my garden waste would be enough to last them all winter. I wish I had a shredder here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
Yes, there is snow, but it's included in that 12" of annual precipitation. I think it's too late for me to try for worms here. Not enough time to make a trip to Walmart, which is an hour and a half to two hours whether I go north, south, east or west. Oh. Wait. Now that I think about it, they may have bait at Coulee Playland. I wonder if my garden waste would be enough to last them all winter. I wish I had a shredder here.
Speaking of desert, maybe look into 'permaculture' to help build your soil and grow crops. There is a guy named Geoff Lawton (permaculture extraordinaire) that has actually created a food forest in the desert. He has several videos on youtube about the practice. And here's a link to a thread about it....... https://www.prepperforums.net/forum/gardening/118401-methods-permaculture.html
 

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Yes, there is snow, but it's included in that 12" of annual precipitation. I think it's too late for me to try for worms here. Not enough time to make a trip to Walmart, which is an hour and a half to two hours whether I go north, south, east or west. Oh. Wait. Now that I think about it, they may have bait at Coulee Playland. I wonder if my garden waste would be enough to last them all winter. I wish I had a shredder here.
If you get some nightcrawlers from a bait store you can make a worm farm pretty easy, you can also mail order nightcrawlers and red wigglers. A two or three big plastic totes that nest together would work. A little bit of rotted compost topped off with leaves. Feed the worms vegetable kitchen waste. Cool place is best, I used to have a setup in the cellar.

Lot of information on the internet.
 

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I could eat bread with something that's the consistency of gravy, but not something that's the consistency of broth. That just makes soggy bread.
Properly cooked cornbread has a lot of texture. That stuff you get in restaurants or out of a little box at the grocery isn't really cornbread in my opinion. This is as big a fight in the South as the 9mm vs .45 debate, but I maintain sugar has not place in cornbread. Cornbread should be no sweeter than the natural sugars in the corn make it.

With your texture issues (or what you call pickiness) I think you would ralph if you saw how simple folks in the South eat cornbread and buttermilk. It is not an appetizing sight, but it is quite tasty!! :vs_laugh:
 

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Properly cooked cornbread has a lot of texture. That stuff you get in restaurants or out of a little box at the grocery isn't really cornbread in my opinion. This is as big a fight in the South as the 9mm vs .45 debate, but I maintain sugar has not place in cornbread. Cornbread should be no sweeter than the natural sugars in the corn make it.

With your texture issues (or what you call pickiness) I think you would ralph if you saw how simple folks in the South eat cornbread and buttermilk. It is not an appetizing sight, but it is quite tasty!! :vs_laugh:
Don't get me started on buttermilk!

FYI, I'm a scratch baker so I know what real cornbread is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Typical woman. :)

I'm surprised you can get ham hocks & collards way out there. The sugar & vinegar aren't really necessary but I like it. The vinegar helps cut the fat from the hocks & the sugar balances the vinegar. Make sure you don't have too much liquid as it will water down the pot liquor.
Almost forgot........we had the hocks, beans, cornbread and the collards......must be a southern thang as I wasn't too impressed. BUT I will say it may have been my inexperience at cooking them. They weren't too bad, but not a new favorite.....so collards will be classified right next to brussel sprouts. As in, only if I have too
 

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Almost forgot........we had the hocks, beans, cornbread and the collards......must be a southern thang as I wasn't too impressed. BUT I will say it may have been my inexperience at cooking them. They weren't too bad, but not a new favorite.....so collards will be classified right next to brussel sprouts. As in, only if I have too
I love Brussels sprouts.
 

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Next year I’m going to try seed tapes for carrots and beets. (That is assuming that seeds and tapes are available and the whole freakin country hasn’t melted down). I’m not real patient at thinning these plants so overcrowding is a problem. Seed tapes are very expensive for what you get. But I want to try them just to see if the concept works and the additional crop is worth the $. This year I got a decent harvest of beets, but my carrot crop was a complete disaster.




Just now I found seed tapes available at Gurneys. I ordered some now so I have them in hand for spring planting.
 

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Next year I'm going to try seed tapes for carrots and beets. (That is assuming that seeds and tapes are available and the whole freakin country hasn't melted down). I'm not real patient at thinning these plants so overcrowding is a problem. Seed tapes are very expensive for what you get. But I want to try them just to see if the concept works and the additional crop is worth the $. This year I got a decent harvest of beets, but my carrot crop was a complete disaster.

Just now I found seed tapes available at Gurneys. I ordered some now so I have them in hand for spring planting.
I haven't actually tried this, but I've been thinking about it for a while. It's still tedious, but I'd much rather complete a tedious task in the climate controlled comfort of my home than hunched over a raised bed or kneeling on the ground in the cold or rain.

Making your own seed tapes.
 

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Next year I'm going to try seed tapes for carrots and beets. (That is assuming that seeds and tapes are available and the whole freakin country hasn't melted down). I'm not real patient at thinning these plants so overcrowding is a problem. Seed tapes are very expensive for what you get. But I want to try them just to see if the concept works and the additional crop is worth the $. This year I got a decent harvest of beets, but my carrot crop was a complete disaster.

Just now I found seed tapes available at Gurneys. I ordered some now so I have them in hand for spring planting.
For price of seed tapes I can buy several ounces of carrots and beets that lasts me several years. I plant nantes and danvers carrots, detroit red beets.

For carrots try this. Plant your rows of carrots in a shallow furrow and inter space radish seeds every foot or so. The radish will germinate faster and shade the carrots which need to stay moist to germinate and take much longer. The radish also mark the carrot rows. As the radish get edible the carrots will be established, and you can pick the radish. Then start to thin the carrots.

Worst problem I have with carrots is keeping ALL the nearby weeds plucked until the carrots get established. Well, that and animal pests........
 
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