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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Storing staples long-term isn't difficult to do, and many of these staples have a shelf-life of Methuselah. It gets tricky when looking for a solution for specialty items like butter, cheese and eggs, especially considering how the price of these items, packaged in #10 cans, has skyrocketed.

The following suggestions have worked for me and waxing cheese is my all-time favorite, and will preserve cheese for years. However, shortcuts aren't recommended. Although paraffin wax is cheaper, it isn't a good substitute for cheese wax as paraffin doesn't give, thus is more likely to crack, allowing air to reach the cheese and start the molding process. Hard cheese like Cheddar will keep for years and is fairly affordable when purchasing mild cheddar--it will continue to age behind its cheese wax coating.

• Waxing Cheese: One of my favorites! YouTuber Katzcradul gives excellent step-by-step instructions on waxing cheese here:
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Disclaimer: I have no affiliation with any YouTubers mentioned here and do not stand to gain any monetary benefit--just happen to love their down to earth, careful, and concise how-to's.
• Home Canning Butter. Warning: The USDA does not recommend home canning butter. I did it anyway, happily becoming a test monkey, and have consumed home canned butter for years to no ill-effects, but its imperative to follow safety guidelines shown in the following video by Katzcradul:
Note: There is a part 1 & 2.
• Home Canning Bacon: Another one of my favorite YouTubers is BexarPrepper who gives a step-by-step on home canning bacon here:
• Preserving Eggs: A recent find I mentioned on another post is preserving eggs for one year (and possibly longer) in a mixture of hydrated lime and water. This was a significant find for me because the price of powdered egg was outside my budget while scrambling to get a few other "must haves" in place. There are other methods to preserve eggs, most notably coating fresh (not store-bought that has the bloom on the outside of the egg washed off) with mineral oil. But the eggs need to be turned over every 2 weeks and the shelf is 6-9 months. Townsend does a great job on his videos demonstrating how our forefathers got by, including how they preserved eggs BEFORE electricity. Note: the last part of the video shows the hydrated lime in water method. This method has not been tested, long-term, by me, but I now have a couple of Home Depot Paint buckets with lids filled with eggs.

Note: To test a preserved egg, set it in a pan of room temp water. If it floats, it should be tossed. If it rests on the bottom, it's safe, and if it hovers under the waterline, but doesn't stay at the bottom, it is probably safe to eat. You'll know for sure by breaking it into a separate bowl and taking the sniff test--trust me, you'll know!
 

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I've canned butter several times, but not in a PC. I did like Deep South Homestead & Starry Hilder, which is 'open kettle' method. and it works great, though I didn't shake the jars as often as I should have when they went in the fridge to solidify and some separation did occur, When I've opened & used the butter, some of them did have a slight sour smell to it but I'm not too concerned with that as I remember that from when I was a kid. But that is used in cooking, not spread on bread or anything either. There has not been anything growing on it and any liquid separation in the bottom of the jar when opened is poured off & I keep the rest in the fridge. The last batch I did a couple of months ago is kept in the extra fridge, it's fine until maybe this winter when it's really cold, I'll probably store it in the shed just to free up the fridge space or if the power goes out. I just won't keep it there in the summer where it will melt and possibly ruin it for sure.

I've also seen some videos about canning cheese, I've not done that and would rather wax it, also something I've not done yet......but where do you get the cheese wax to do it with, without buying online???

Bacon....I had bought a 10lb box of miscuts & ends & pieces and canned it without the parchment paper......just stuffed it in the jar and processed @10lb for however long. It is great for using in recipes or omelets or whatever you want pieces for and there is plenty of stored bacon fat in each of the jars as well and it won't go rancid like when you save it on the counter. The biggest drawback is that the bacon is fully cooked and won't crisp up no matter how much you cook it again.

Eggs......I've still not tried the limed eggs, but do have chickens to keep providing fresh ones. I have dehydrated & powdered many of the extras as I'd seen done on YT that I can't find the video now and it may have been deleted. I'd gotten the idea of powdered raw eggs from a video series of life & rationing during WW2 I think it was called 'Wartime Kitchen & garden' or something like that. I think I may have posted a thread about it somewhere and will check in a minute.

All those channels are a great source of information, thanks for posting
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Waxing cheese is the most enjoyable food storage chore I've ever done, and the cheese keeps for years. I buy from New England Cheesmaking Supply, $13.95 for 1 LB# on amazon. It took about 1 1/2 pounds to preserve 17.5 lbs# of cheddar cheese. I'd recommend red or black color cheese wax--the yellow is harder to judge where the wax stops and starts when preserving cheddar. It took around two weeks to get it through the mail, but hopefully now that things have settled down a bit with people clambering for supplies, delivery will be quicker.

If you try it, I'd love to hear how it went!
 

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Waxing cheese is the most enjoyable food storage chore I've ever done, and the cheese keeps for years. I buy from New England Cheesmaking Supply, $13.95 for 1 LB# on amazon. It took about 1 1/2 pounds to preserve 17.5 lbs# of cheddar cheese. I'd recommend red or black color cheese wax--the yellow is harder to judge where the wax stops and starts when preserving cheddar. It took around two weeks to get it through the mail, but hopefully now that things have settled down a bit with people clambering for supplies, delivery will be quicker.

If you try it, I'd love to hear how it went!
ok, so tell me more about dipping the cheese in the wax.....I'm assuming the wax is first melted in a pan on the stove, then dip your block of cheese till half or so is covered, let it cool & harden...….then dip the other half??? Do you only dip it once or several times for an extra thick layer??? And I'm guessing this wax is the same or similar to store bought Gouda???

Yes? No?
 

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I've looked for the video about dehydrating & powdering raw eggs and it's been taken off YT, and can't find it here either. If I did post it here, it's lost within numerous pages of other threads, but since it's no longer available I can't repost it.

But the general idea is to scramble up a bunch of eggs, pour a layer onto fruit roll up sheets not quite full to leave room for expansion, dehydrate @ 140-145(?) until crispy/crackly dry (8-10 hours?)...….it may feel a little oily but you can tap it with a paper towel if you choose...….run it thru a grinder or blender to powder, then spread it out again on the roll up sheets & dry for about an hour...….just to be sure. Then store it. I have mine in glass or plastic jars (reused mayo jars, or canning jars that can't be canned with-have a nick or defect along the rim)

When you use them, add 1 1/2 tablespoons powder to 2-3 tablespoons warm water (equals 1 large egg) with just a drop of oil, stir & let sit to rehydrate. Then cook them for scrambled eggs. I've done this and you wouldn't know if they were dehydrated or fresh from the chicken.
If you use them for baking or adding to other recipes, you can skip the drop of oil. But in straight up scrambled, you do want the drop of oil. Without it, the eggs are grainy texture and the oil fixes that problem.
 

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Waxing cheese is the most enjoyable food storage chore I've ever done, and the cheese keeps for years. I buy from New England Cheesmaking Supply, $13.95 for 1 LB# on amazon. It took about 1 1/2 pounds to preserve 17.5 lbs# of cheddar cheese. I'd recommend red or black color cheese wax--the yellow is harder to judge where the wax stops and starts when preserving cheddar. It took around two weeks to get it through the mail, but hopefully now that things have settled down a bit with people clambering for supplies, delivery will be quicker.

If you try it, I'd love to hear how it went!
That's something I've never tried...Maybe I look into it. :tango_face_smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's something I've never tried...Maybe I look into it. :tango_face_smile:
Of all the prepper-related must-do's, its the most fun, almost like a kid's project. The first time I tried it, I didn't let the cheese sit out for 24 hours or dip it in vinegar and it oozed oils. Re-did it (cheese wax can be cleaned and re-used) and it's lasted for years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ok, so tell me more about dipping the cheese in the wax.....I'm assuming the wax is first melted in a pan on the stove, then dip your block of cheese till half or so is covered, let it cool & harden...….then dip the other half??? Do you only dip it once or several times for an extra thick layer??? And I'm guessing this wax is the same or similar to store bought Gouda???

Yes? No?
The wax is melted in a pan you don't care about (hard to get the wax out). Got mine at Goodwill : ) Because hot wax can be flammable, a double boiler is recommended. I don't have one, so I set the wax-melting pan inside a another, larger pan, and fill it part-way with water. Don't overfill the water so it ends up splashing in your melted cheese wax pan. Heat the wax to around 220 degrees. Dip half the cheese into the melted wax and hold it for around 20 seconds--it solidifies quickly, then hold it by the waxed end and dip the untreated side into the melted wax, overlapping the wax a bit in the middle. Three coats seals it. Any cracks can be filled in, but I've never ended up with cracks, and I don't believe you will either. Cracks lead to mold. Because refrigeration might not be available if SHTF, I cut the 2-lb# blocks of mild cheddar in 4 manageable pieces, so it doesn't mold, but rather is consumed. The cheese wax can be reused--wash it well, make sure it's dry, and your good to go to remelt it.

Watching the video will make it much clearer than what I'm writing here, but I hope this helps.

Any hard cheese can be waxed. I wax Parmesan cheese as well. My family loves all things cheese!
 

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The wax is melted in a pan you don't care about (hard to get the wax out). Got mine at Goodwill : ) Because hot wax can be flammable, a double boiler is recommended. I don't have one, so I set the wax-melting pan inside a another, larger pan, and fill it part-way with water. Don't overfill the water so it ends up splashing in your melted cheese wax pan. Heat the wax to around 220 degrees. Dip half the cheese into the melted wax and hold it for around 20 seconds--it solidifies quickly, then hold it by the waxed end and dip the untreated side into the melted wax, overlapping the wax a bit in the middle. Three coats seals it. Any cracks can be filled in, but I've never ended up with cracks, and I don't believe you will either. Cracks lead to mold. Because refrigeration might not be available if SHTF, I cut the 2-lb# blocks of mild cheddar in 4 manageable pieces, so it doesn't mold, but rather is consumed. The cheese wax can be reused--wash it well, make sure it's dry, and your good to go to remelt it.

Watching the video will make it much clearer than what I'm writing here, but I hope this helps.

Any hard cheese can be waxed. I wax Parmesan cheese as well. My family loves all things cheese!
And the cheese is really shelf stable?
 

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I've looked for the video about dehydrating & powdering raw eggs and it's been taken off YT, and can't find it here either. If I did post it here, it's lost within numerous pages of other threads, but since it's no longer available I can't repost it.

But the general idea is to scramble up a bunch of eggs, pour a layer onto fruit roll up sheets not quite full to leave room for expansion, dehydrate @ 140-145(?) until crispy/crackly dry (8-10 hours?)...….it may feel a little oily but you can tap it with a paper towel if you choose...….run it thru a grinder or blender to powder, then spread it out again on the roll up sheets & dry for about an hour...….just to be sure. Then store it. I have mine in glass or plastic jars (reused mayo jars, or canning jars that can't be canned with-have a nick or defect along the rim)

When you use them, add 1 1/2 tablespoons powder to 2-3 tablespoons warm water (equals 1 large egg) with just a drop of oil, stir & let sit to rehydrate. Then cook them for scrambled eggs. I've done this and you wouldn't know if they were dehydrated or fresh from the chicken.
If you use them for baking or adding to other recipes, you can skip the drop of oil. But in straight up scrambled, you do want the drop of oil. Without it, the eggs are grainy texture and the oil fixes that problem.
In a pinch you can substitute 1 Tbsp oF Knox Gelatine powder and 2 Tbsps warm water mixed together. ETA: that's for cake recipes and such, not for eating alone ofcourse.
 

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@itstimetobunker I've always meant to do the bacon canning. Haven't gotten around to it...Maybe soon! I'm a little concerned about canning butter as there's no usda approved method. I know people say they can it safely all over youtube, and maybe they're right. I just won't do it unless it's approved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
@itstimetobunker I've always meant to do the bacon canning. Haven't gotten around to it...Maybe soon! I'm a little concerned about canning butter as there's no usda approved method. I know people say they can it safely all over youtube, and maybe they're right. I just won't do it unless it's approved.
I was hesitant myself. Decided to try it anyway because sometimes I have a hard time behaving : ) Of course, that could double back and bite one on the a*#. Have had no ill effects so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
And the cheese is really shelf stable?
The cheese is genuinely shelf stable. I've been consuming mine for more than two years after it was preserved. A crack in the cheese wax is the enemy, but if that were to happen you would have obvious mold when peeling away the cheese wax. The cheese ages and mild cheddar becomes sharp.
 

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The wax is melted in a pan you don't care about (hard to get the wax out). Got mine at Goodwill : ) Because hot wax can be flammable, a double boiler is recommended. I don't have one, so I set the wax-melting pan inside a another, larger pan, and fill it part-way with water. Don't overfill the water so it ends up splashing in your melted cheese wax pan. Heat the wax to around 220 degrees. Dip half the cheese into the melted wax and hold it for around 20 seconds--it solidifies quickly, then hold it by the waxed end and dip the untreated side into the melted wax, overlapping the wax a bit in the middle. Three coats seals it. Any cracks can be filled in, but I've never ended up with cracks, and I don't believe you will either. Cracks lead to mold. Because refrigeration might not be available if SHTF, I cut the 2-lb# blocks of mild cheddar in 4 manageable pieces, so it doesn't mold, but rather is consumed. The cheese wax can be reused--wash it well, make sure it's dry, and your good to go to remelt it.

Watching the video will make it much clearer than what I'm writing here, but I hope this helps.

Any hard cheese can be waxed. I wax Parmesan cheese as well. My family loves all things cheese!
OK, thanks.....and yes, I used to dabble making candles many years ago, with just about the same method as you mention for cheese.
 

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The cheese is genuinely shelf stable. I've been consuming mine for more than two years after it was preserved. A crack in the cheese wax is the enemy, but if that were to happen you would have obvious mold when peeling away the cheese wax. The cheese ages and mild cheddar becomes sharp.
As long as the mold is on the surface....and not all throughout....you can cut it off and still eat the rest or re-wax it.
 

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@itstimetobunker I've always meant to do the bacon canning. Haven't gotten around to it...Maybe soon! I'm a little concerned about canning butter as there's no usda approved method. I know people say they can it safely all over youtube, and maybe they're right. I just won't do it unless it's approved.
I do understand your concern, but I will say that no other country in the world has an FDA or USDA to approve of their preservation methods, that they've been doing probably for as long as Americans have. If you are an experienced canner and know the in's & out's and have successfully canned meats & vegetables...….then it's all about common sense with other products that aren't 'approved'. But do your research too, to make sure others have successfully done it. Mostly your resources would be YouTube or family or friends, so just watch their methods.

Another thing to consider is the fact that botulism is killed at 240(without oxygen) AND any low acid foods should be cooked after opening, before eaten...…..has to do with the bot spores(?) with oxygen are killed in the reheating process (212)…...sorry, that is a bit confusing, but as I had always canned everything in a WB, I finally found someone to explain how botulism worked. I don't remember all the details of the explanation, but it did include the differences in changes of the botulism(germ vs spore) in an oxygen vs no oxygen environment and the amount of heat needed to kill it in each stage (yes it's killed in a pc at 240 in a no oxygen environment, but as precaution against any possible sneakies, to boil after it's opened (212 with oxygen)...…..even USDA/FDA says to boil any low acid foods after opening and before eating. Just sayin

ps...….actually that's probably why I and my mother & Aunt had survived for so many years when WB canning....we never ate low acid foods straight from the jar and always boiled it first. Just a guess, but makes sense.
 

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In a pinch you can substitute 1 Tbsp oF Knox Gelatine powder and 2 Tbsps warm water mixed together. ETA: that's for cake recipes and such, not for eating alone ofcourse.
Do you mean to use the gelatin as a substitute for egg??? I never would have thought that.

Wouldn't it effect the cake differently?? Don't eggs provide something needed for the cake to rise or something like that?? IDK
 

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Do you mean to use the gelatin as a substitute for egg??? I never would have thought that.

Wouldn't it effect the cake differently?? Don't eggs provide something needed for the cake to rise or something like that?? IDK
Baking powder makes cakes rise. Eggs help hold the baked goods together. It's worth having a jar of Knox around if you don't keep chickens.

As an aside I remember back in the day there was a rumor going around that it made your fingernails stronger and my mom would drink it in a glass of plain water. Yuck! :vs_laugh: Don't know that it worked, but that's what the ladies in town said to do.
 
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