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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I have started the process of putting together my first BOB. I am in sales and spend a lot of time in my car. What considerations should be made in regards to water and batteries when exposed to continuous extreme temperatures from sitting in a car all day 5 + days per week. Thanks for any advice.

RLC
 

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As long as the water doesn't get hotter than 140F degrees it will not absorb any chemicals from plastic containers.
Batteries become more active when temps are high. At around 100F degrees the dry cell batteries will begin to leak. If you replace them with lithium based batteries then you have no problems - they love temps in the 100F to 150F range.
 

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Welcome from Mississippi. To me your BOB should have what you feel is necessary for your needs. I have one in my SUV, which has first aid kit, batteries, knive, emergency radio & twoway radio, fix-a-tire kit, small tent, lighters, rope, water, food, and self-defense items I will keep to myself. You now what is best for you. Think about. What is around the areas you travel. Then on water?, hot water is better than no water. You may need to change things as need.
 

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Welcome from Missouri.

There's tons of threads on this site and as many opinions about what should go in your BOB. My belief is it's what you are comfortable with. Starting with the basics of shelter, water, food, self-defense and build your BOB to your tastes and the season. No need to carry a ten pound arctic sleeping bag in the summer. At least not in most areas. Good luck and post often.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hello,

I have an additional question. I have been trying to organize my pack. I bought a VISM tactical pack. I have focused on essentials, food, fire, shelter and water. My goal is to have a 2-3 day pack. After putting 3 1 liter bottles in my pack its weight is getting up to 25 lbs and I still
have a few items left to put in there. I realize that 3 liters of water is not sufficient, I do not have the room for more water and I am trying to keep the weight down as much as possible. I live in East TN and we have an abundance of small streams lakes and rivers. Any advise would be great.
Thanks
RLC
 

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Keep two of the bottles and get a filtration system to make the stream water safe to drink. OR Get rid of the bottles entirely and get two bladders for water. Have on full and the other ready to fill with your filter system from a stream.
 

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Keep two of the bottles and get a filtration system to make the stream water safe to drink. OR Get rid of the bottles entirely and get two bladders for water. Have on full and the other ready to fill with your filter system from a stream.
This. A 2L USGI canteen bladder with cover and shoulder strap and a way to filter water to it. Sawyer makes a great filtration system for going container to container and had a mind boggling lifetime filtration capacity for around $60.00.
 

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In a vehicle during hot weather I store the heat sensitive items water batteries etc. as close to the floor boards as possible. When feasible I crack a couple of window just enough to vent off some of the heat that builds up. For the vehicle I buy the bottled water and rotate it out every so often to keep it fresh.

The region will dictate how much water to carry in the vehicle. I live in an area where it can be a very long way between places to find water to filter. So I carry a bit more (several gallons) on board.
 

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Keep the fire starter in your bag but, forget about using it unless you're in a life threatening situation. The smoke and smell will give you away in a heartbeat. Not what you want when bugging out. Your goal is to get from A to B as quickly and safely as possible. Forgo some comfort, for security for the short term.

For the water, follow what's been said. Carry less water, but a way to filter (and purify) what is available.
 

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IMO, forget plastic water bottles and get 2 X 32 oz uninsulated stainless steel water bottles that you can boil water in if you have to. I also carry a LifeStraw, a small bottle of iodine purification tabs, and a 64 oz hydration bladder. I also pack my clothing in a 5 liter waterproof bag that could be used for collecting rainwater or whatever.

My "system" would go something like this...

1 - Collect water in the bag, then pre-filter it through a t-shirt into the 2 SS water bottles.

2 - Put the bottles in fire and boil the water, then let it cool.

3 - Dump it into the hydration bladder.

4 - Boil 2 more quarts of water, let them cool, then cap them up.

The LifeStraw and iodine tabs are backups for those times I don't want to risk making fire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hello All,
I would appreciate any insights on using water purification tablets instead of a filtered bottle. I am trying to keep the weight of my bag down as much as possible. Any pros and cons would be great. Thanks for your input!
 

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If you have an abundance of streams and fresh water I'd suggest buying a LifeStraw! It's super cheap ($20) and will filter somewhat murky water into clear water. Hubby and I both have one in our BOB, cause I also don't see carrying a ton of water as a viable option. Granted we do have a few water canteens each in the bag. We also have 2 different ways to boil water.
 

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We also have a Sawyer water filter that's guaranteed to filter 1 million gallons. Found that at a Bass Pro Shop and you can attach it to anything like a 20 oz bottle or 2 L! There's also a way to hook it to a hose I believe. That and the LifeStraw are extremely light.
 

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In addition to everything that has been mentioned so far, I would consider adding a couple pairs of good quality wool socks. They are light weight and nothing will slow you down more than blisters on your feet if you have to hoof it more than a mile or two.
 
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They have what is called smart-wool... they are awsome socks... they really reduce blister potential on a long hike and they are warm.. look at smart-wool ski socks.


standard wool socks may air / twirl dry better however..
 

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I carry a Lifestraw and an aluminum water bottle filled with fresh water. With this set up, you can keep your weight down and you can either fill the metal water bottle and boil it, or you can fill it and use the Lifestraw.
I'm leaning this way except adding some tablets as a precaution and of course a bandana for a pre-filter. Is a lifestraw, 1l SS bottle, tablets and a Berky bottle overkill?
 
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