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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I found the class via the American Heart Association. I got on the phone with the instructor today to ask some questions about the different classes offered. One is just for CPR and choking. The one we’re looking at has that + AED and basic first aid.
 

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Purchase a good Wilderness First Aid Book and read it.

Most First Aid courses today teach you to do very little except dial 911.

If you are concerned about when there is no hospital available you probably need to do independent study to get it.
The book will remain with you for quick consultation.

Suggested $22 book: Link

If you want to really learn it then read it and then teach it to someone else. You will quickly learn what must be already in your head and what can be read later.
Then if you want take a regular First Aid course.

Consider having the reader in the family read it and teach the others.

Best of luck to you.
 

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Found this a while back on the USMC site. It's in the public domain so don't worry about copyright. Many more like it out there for free.

https://www.marines.mil/Portals/1/Publications/MCRP 3-40A.9.pdf?ver=2020-02-06-084616-133

Most important thing about FA training is the "training" as practice is important.

One more word of advice, unless you are buying a really high end FA Kit build your own as a lot of the prepackaged kits contain junk.

Godspeed.
 

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Agree with @jimcosta and @CapitalKane49p.

those red cross and emt courses give you basic skills which are not very useful unless you practice them.
there is a saying that common things happen commonly...
basic injuries that you may need to treat if medical services are unavailable or... risky (covid filled ers)

lacerations.
cuts
bruises.
fractures
sprains

some good skills to learn as well as medical supplies to purchase...

suturing or stapling a simple laceration...
we have medical students and interns (not much better than a medical student) repair these in the Emergency deparments. there are kits which have needle drivers (a fancy clamp used to hold curved needles) pickups (tweezers), and sutures.
https://www.amazon.com/Needle-Cutti...ocphy=9012570&hvtargid=pla-583471352806&psc=1

you can do similar things with fishing hook removers
https://www.orvis.com/p/scissor-for...osH9kN2B6gIVjIFaBR2UxwfNEAQYBiAB EgIrU_D_BwE
https://www.sportsmans.com/fishing-...osH9kN2B6gIVjIFaBR2UxwfNEAQYCSAB EgLjdvD_BwE

with some needles and thread..
https://www.medicaldevicedepot.com/...zJedkt6B6gIVLYNaBR0Vpwf4EAQYBSAB EgKQCPD_BwE

you can practice on a pig leg or chicken leg.. with the skin on it...
here is a guide on how to tie knots.. sutures
http://surgsoc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Ethicon-Knot-Tying-Manual.pdf

here is a suture guide

how to set and splint a broken bone
how to fix a dislocated shoulder arm ankle etc...

these skills are a little more complex and you really cant learn from a youtube video...
but in the old days... country docs would do this without even x rays...
 

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My husband and I are planning to take a CPR class soon. Does anyone have any other suggestions for improving our skills in medical response/first aid, etc.?
You could do volunteer firefighting after gaining the prerequisite certifications.

Another option is to go to your local community college and take anatomy and physiology 1 and 2. I took anatomy 1 as an elective and learned a ton of useful applicable insight.

Hands on experience will bolster your confidence in a real situations.
 
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You could do volunteer firefighting after gaining the prerequisite certifications.

Another option is to go to your local community college and take anatomy and physiology 1 and 2. I took anatomy 1 as an elective and learned a ton of useful applicable insight.

Hands on experience will bolster your confidence in a real situations.
Person that knows all that would do good to snag a degree in mortuary science and make big money. No dissatisfied customers in that vocation.
 

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Former Army Medic here. CPR is a good starting spot. sometimes you can find some BLS courses, but the ALS courses are a bit harder to come by. Learn how to treat some common basic wounds; splinting a break, learn about the different types of fractures. learn about the different degrees of burns, how to treat them. Trauma is pretty easy to be completely honest, it's just having the opportunity to learn. I still have a bunch of my old manuals and stuff from my time at Ft. Sam. I don't know if anyone wanted to scan and upload them as a resource, i'd be willing to mail it to whoever would like to read it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Former Army Medic here. CPR is a good starting spot. sometimes you can find some BLS courses, but the ALS courses are a bit harder to come by. Learn how to treat some common basic wounds; splinting a break, learn about the different types of fractures. learn about the different degrees of burns, how to treat them. Trauma is pretty easy to be completely honest, it's just having the opportunity to learn. I still have a bunch of my old manuals and stuff from my time at Ft. Sam. I don't know if anyone wanted to scan and upload them as a resource, i'd be willing to mail it to whoever would like to read it.
I would be very interested in that, but only if you have the free time!
 

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Person that knows all that would do good to snag a degree in mortuary science and make big money. No dissatisfied customers in that vocation.
But then you have to be around the dead all the time. I prefer the living. That's definitely not a profession for me...I'd do it if I had to but there are so many other options.

Have you ever seen the movie "Screwed" with Danny Davito as the mortician? Comedy gold imo.
 
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My husband and I are planning to take a CPR class soon. Does anyone have any other suggestions for improving our skills in medical response/first aid, etc.?
The army used to have the course material on line for their combat lifesaver program. Will see if I can find it and post it tonight when I get off work
 

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My husband and I are planning to take a CPR class soon. Does anyone have any other suggestions for improving our skills in medical response/first aid, etc.?
You local fire Department trains emts and its 1-3 months without paying for or doing paramedic. You could check with them about the short certificate emt program which will include cpr and a lot of handy knowhow
 

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Ok sorry to OP for going on a tangent. Just saw that wound suture video above...Why is it that I can suture my own forearm, stop a gushing wound on my knee, bandage my head and drive to the hospital with blood drinking down my neck, and but yet I nearly hurl my lunch while watching some person suturing a fabricated human skin, I mean it wasn't even a real person . My Gramps long ago suggested taking a shot or 2 of hoochie, and sure enough, works like a charm, thus one of my preps I bring is a flask, a mixture of Vodka & Spiced Rum.

W/regard to OP, err I mean the few that have responded here in 2023 & thereafter, I personally suggest getting EMT training books. Best though to have 1st hand training, but the EMT training book will give you an edge reading it prior to taking the course. I have one in my Truck & another at home.
 
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