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Discussion Starter #1
We all here know the old adages:

FIFO: First In First Out,

Eat what you store. Store what you eat.

But do you practice it?

Part of our storage plan is to store and possibly (hopefully) never eat it.

An example would be white rice. I see value in having it on hand for many reasons. I have no desire to eat it pre SHFT.

Dry beans and corn meal are another only difference is we eat them and can rotate in small quantities.

Anyone else store like this? If so what are you storing?
 

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We practice FIFO. I've seen folks that store food for some day down the road. They are called hoarders. :mrgreen:

Went to repair a washing machine for one woman when I lived in Louisville. She "stored" everything, even dog crap. Her basement was SO full that I had to crawl over the pile, which was within a foot of the ceiling near the steps, to get at the washer. Not sure how she did it... But, somehow.

Of course, no prepper wants to be considered a hoarder, but there is a thin line there somewhere and at times, it seems people cross that line, especially if they don't USE what they store. So, keep buying, but use the oldest stock in your kitchen daily. Otherwise, when -- or if -- the day comes, you don't know what to do with the stuff anyway.
 

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Hoard according to the dictionary.

noun
1.
a supply or accumulation that is hidden or carefully guarded for preservation, future use, etc.: a vast hoard of silver.

verb (used with object)
2.
to accumulate for preservation, future use, etc., in a hidden or carefully guarded place: to hoard food during a shortage.

verb (used without object)
3.
to accumulate money, food, or the like, in a hidden or carefully guarded place for preservation, future use, etc.

Yep, I guess I am a hoarder.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hoard according to the dictionary.

noun
1.
a supply or accumulation that is hidden or carefully guarded for preservation, future use, etc.: a vast hoard of silver.

verb (used with object)
2.
to accumulate for preservation, future use, etc., in a hidden or carefully guarded place: to hoard food during a shortage.

verb (used without object)
3.
to accumulate money, food, or the like, in a hidden or carefully guarded place for preservation, future use, etc.

Yep, I guess I am a hoarder.
LOL. Good Call.
 

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We purchase and store foods and beverages we like to eat and drink. We rotate stock by eating what is reaching expiration dates, which we write in large black magic markers on the packages/cans. We make a list of what we eat on a small pad we keep on the shelves with the supplies and replace what we consume.

We also experiment with new foods to expand what we have as options. Recently we tried Hormel canned tamales, which were actually quite good, and could be eaten directly from the can (after you remove the paper tamale wrappers). Not restaurant quality, but very edible and actually tasted pretty good. Also tried some canned Libby's country sausage gravy, which failed our taste testing, but my Lab thought it was really yummy on top of his kibbles...! Hormel chili was a winner, as were Hormel Vienna sausage bites - dollar store purchases.

We store rice, pasta, and related side dishes as packaged, meal size dishes in a box. The foil pouches inside the boxes store easily, and are insect and rodent proof.

Buying foods you like to eat makes prepping more fun, and it comes in handy if you don't want to run to the store, as long as you maintain inventory control and replenish what you quaffed.
 

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I'll second the motion Jardude. Maintaining as much normalcy, especially for children is important. The idea of spending a fortune on MREs and so on drives my crazy. They're for awhile but I'd rather eat the same food I normally eat.
 

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Yep, Keep it rotated and replace it as you consume it. Changing your diet is stressful but changing your diet under stressful conditions can actually kill you.
Eat that rice and those beans occassionally to keep your body used to it or to get your body used to it. If you are storing something that is not in your daily diet then it is either for trade or a waste.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Not eating rice and beans has nothing to do being able to tolerate it.

We've eaten enough of it to know we can eat it.
 

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We only buy what we eat, we cycle in and cycle out, we keep a pad of paper and a pencil near our goods, and the wife keeps a list. I check with her before we go to the store to add to the storage.

You do not want to store items that you would not normally eat.

It will cause you digestive problems at the worst time.

It will cause you undo stress to eat abnormal food, if you are fat and eating sugar all of the time, and SHTF the next day you are on dried beans and rice, you will be big time in trouble in three days.

Eat what you store, store what you eat, cycle in and cycle out.

Decide a time frame to store, decide food types, do the math on what you will need to get you there, and put together your storage a little at a time or a lot at a time. But get it underway.

Three cans per person per day, start with a week. Go to a month. Three months then six.

In my opinion in a northern state where winter lasts from October to May you need six months storage.
 

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At this time, I am working on the foods we eat. My wife is doesn't harrass me about prepping, but I can tell she thinks I'm a bit paranoid. I do the prep shopping, and I skim from her shopping goods when she is not around. I have seriously begun to win her over with what I am doing by having food on hand. "Darn, we are out of corn!" she says...and a few minutes later I come up from the basement with the can. Out of coffee?...I got you covered. Out of soda for your seven and seven?...look what I have honey! Oh...you need some aaa batteries...what will you do?

Everytime I do this, I tell her it's her responsibility now to go to the store and replace it. This has begun to bring her to my side.

As for rice and beans...I look at those big bags everytime I am at Costco. Can't bring myself yet to buy them. I am still working on my one month stock.


One concern I have about rice and beans. You have to cook them for quite a while in a lot of water. That doesn't seem to go well with short term SHTF. If the power goes out for weeks because of a blizzard, How the heck am I going to boil a pot for hours. I'd rather hit the simpler foods to prepare.
 

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We had 15 bean "ham bean soup" just last night with fresh cornbread cooked in our solar oven,Mmm,Mmm.....but I did cheat a little,the cornbread was jiffy muffin mix.We always wanted to try the 15 bean mix,my 13yr old son was reluctant to try it until we made him,lol,but then he was like "hey,this taste just like our regular bean soup" as he crumbled up some buttered cornbread in and finished his bowl.

We are pretty lucky that everyone here likes beans (we usually make great northern beans and thats also the type i keep stored).We all like white rice as well,plain or flavored up in a number of ways.Eating our long term stores won't be an issue,i'm sure it will get old after a while when it's a main part of the daily diet,but I also store alot of rotated "comfort foods,sauces,seasonings,candies,drink mixes,etc" to keep the kids from burning out on rice and beans.

I stock ALOT bit of freeze dried meats,seasonings,onion soup mix,bolioun,etc. in my LTS as well as canned and freeze dried veggies so theres always something different to add to the dish along with harvesting our garden which we only plant fruits,veggies,herbs that the family will actually eat and we also choose plants that have higher yields as our garden is "somewhat" limited on space-for example.I don't mess with a bunch of lettuce when in the same room it takes to grow one head of lettuce I can get a 5gal bucket of tomatoes or a dozen ears of corn,a ton of strawberries,etc. Same goes for melons,cucumber,zucchini,etc. having peach and apple trees helps as well.We also live on the edge of a national forest loaded with walnut,blackberries and raspberries which i've been collecting and canning berries for several years now as well as hunt the land.

I'm sure we'll all miss a good pizza and even McDonalds,But i'm very thankful that when we are down to "rice and beans" it'll be far from JUST rice and beans,and a great deal of it is foods we eat reguarly now and a wealth of nature at our backdoor.There won't be any shock to our system other than getting healthier by no longer having fast food around.I'm ready for that.

I'm in full agreement,don't stock foods you won't eat.There is such a thing as "food fatigue" when a person burns out on eating the same over and over and simply loses the will to eat,that could be life or death.If you can't do rice and beans,find another source of nutrition staple you can eat.Like the woman said on doomsday preppers-"I might be eating rice and beans at the end of the world,but they're gonna be some kick ass rice and beans!".
 

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Discussion Starter #15
You must not like Asian or Mexican food.
As a whole? No.

We make several Mexican dishes that we love. There are a few of the plainer asian dishes I like.

As far as comments about appetite fatigue and diet change killing etc am not looking to switch from what we eat now to eating rice 21 meals a week post SHTF. I'm thinking this could be a ration stretcher. Maybe 3 servings of rice and 1-2 of beans along with what we normally eat.

For example last night we had creamed (canned) chicken. We could have easily added some rice to that without any objectives from adults or kids.
 

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It takes less than an hour to cook up a pot of beans in my pressure cooker. The added benifit is that it takes the same amount of time at 5000 feet altitude as it does at sea level with the pressure cooker. I suggest you get one and learn how to use it. I can take a frozen roast to beef stew in about an hour and a half.
Its better than a crock pot, microwave and convection oven and costs less than $50.
 
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Discussion Starter #17
It takes less than an hour to cook up a pot of beans in my pressure cooker. The added benifit is that it takes the same amount of time at 5000 feet altitude as it does at sea level with the pressure cooker.
That'd depend on the type of regulator on the pressure cooker. If you have a fixed regulator it'll still take longer at 5k'.

Either way ya better get your pressure cookers while ya still can.
 

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Don't talk about pressure cookers, he secret police might be listening.
That's another reason to hate these bastards - both the terrorists and the administration that will soon want to ban pressure cookers. I was looking at garage sales for a cheap pressure cooker for my wood shop all last summer. I never did find a decent one. (I am not going to spend the money for a new one just for a woodworking experiment.) Now these idiots are blowing them up, while the other idiots are likely going to make me go through a background check just to buy one now! GRRR!!!
 

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Don't talk about pressure cookers, he secret police might be listening.
I was thinking about that this morning... No prepper anywhere in their right mind had anything to do with that mess. Both the BOB and the cookers are too much necessary items to us. Only a whack job would use them to do that.
 
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