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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i generally bring a large cooler and a small cooler with me when hunting, so i can properly field dress a deer and cool it ASAP. I feel like it preserves the flavor, rather than letting it sit and get warm.. cuts down on the bacteria in the meat. but, Ive also heard of a lot of folks that do not field dress a deer. I kill it, hang it, and start cutting and can usually have it done up and in the coolers within the hour. what are your thoughts, tips?
 
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Same here. I usually have mine in the coolers pretty quick. I like to put mine on ice and keep them in the back of the truck for a few days. Change out the ice daily and the driving around sloshes the ice/water around and actually cleans the meat out of excess blood and stuff. After about 3 days. The meat is a nice pretty pink color and ready to go.
 

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It really depends on the weather. If the temps are cold (below 40F) then after gutting the animal I will wash the cavity and open it to cool the carcass. If it is warmer than 40F I will pack the cavity with ice and keep it cold until I can get it to refrigeration. If it is really warm I will cut and quarter it and get it all on ice as quickly as I can. The problem with most harvested meat is the care it receives (or does not receive) right after death. I have only had "gamey" meat from those who wait to clean the carcass and let it stay warm. My venison does not have that gamey taste - more like beef without the fat content.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Exactly. I like to take tender-loving-care to my fresh meat. I try not to bruise or thrash it it around. I even take care when moving a corpse, not to break anything and to keep everything in tact.
 

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Exactly. I like to take tender-loving-care to my fresh meat. I try not to bruise or thrash it it around. I even take care when moving a corpse, not to break anything and to keep everything in tact.
A friend will help you move. A TRUE friend will help you move dead bodies!!
 

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i generally bring a large cooler and a small cooler with me when hunting, so i can properly field dress a deer and cool it ASAP. I feel like it preserves the flavor, rather than letting it sit and get warm.. cuts down on the bacteria in the meat. but, Ive also heard of a lot of folks that do not field dress a deer. I kill it, hang it, and start cutting and can usually have it done up and in the coolers within the hour. what are your thoughts, tips?
I had this thought. What about a skinning rig made of heavy PVC or even wooden framing that has pulley and cables and a hook, and like you could hook it up to a four wheeler and pull the skin off like you do a squirrel? Think it would work?
 

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Soaking the meat in a brine of salt-water and sugar at about 35-40 degrees (changing the brine daily) for about 4 days before you smoke it also cuts down on the gamey flavor too.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I had this thought. What about a skinning rig made of heavy PVC or even wooden framing that has pulley and cables and a hook, and like you could hook it up to a four wheeler and pull the skin off like you do a squirrel? Think it would work?
Oh! That is a good thought! But in my experience, its been easier to yank the skin off of a squirrel than a deer. I dont know why, but I always have to tug and cut more with a deer than a squirrel. who knows though! Worth a shot, I guess haha
 

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I had this thought. What about a skinning rig made of heavy PVC or even wooden framing that has pulley and cables and a hook, and like you could hook it up to a four wheeler and pull the skin off like you do a squirrel? Think it would work?
It will, I know a guy who traps that has a setup with duck billed vise grips and a cheap harbor freight winch.
 

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I had this thought. What about a skinning rig made of heavy PVC or even wooden framing that has pulley and cables and a hook, and like you could hook it up to a four wheeler and pull the skin off like you do a squirrel? Think it would work?
Rednecks hang the critter in a tree, open a beer,tie a rope around a rock in the hide,open a beer,tie the other end to a Truck,open a beer and drive off.
 

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I've never done it myself but have a buddy that swear by using an air compressor. He said he punctures a hole and slides the nozzle in between the meat and hide and it blows up and damn near pops off. I have never even seen it done but sounds pretty cool..
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I've never done it myself but have a buddy that swear by using an air compressor. He said he punctures a hole and slides the nozzle in between the meat and hide and it blows up and damn near pops off. I have never even seen it done but sounds pretty cool..
I SO want to try it.
 

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I had this thought. What about a skinning rig made of heavy PVC or even wooden framing that has pulley and cables and a hook, and like you could hook it up to a four wheeler and pull the skin off like you do a squirrel? Think it would work?
I don't hunt yet, but forgive me for asking why you wouldn't just strap the deer to the quad and get it to your permanent hanging hook???

Though I have to admit, that assumes you're hunting on your own land instead of someone else's or state game lands.
 

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Sorry I had a really good chart but I can't find it.

Anyway here is the scoop form personal experience hanging anything from Antelope to Deer to Elk in very possible season.

1. Every game animal benefits from hanging, it streaches out the muscles and gives the meat better "form"

2. There are beneficial bacteria that break down the meat and make it more tender and (some say less "gamey")

3. The hang time depends on the temperature where the animal was harvested x the temperature of the air as well as the temperature of the critter you shot.

3. So if you shot your Antelope on a hot day running full blast across 3 miles of sagebrush your hang time is almost NOTHING. The meat temperature combined with the climate temperature justifies butchering it on the spot and cooling it.

4. If you shoot an elk that hasn't been running in Montana (today it is 5 degrees below zero) then you can easily hang it for 2 weeks in your garage at 30 degrees without ANY problem whatsoever.

5. A side note I talked to a friend at cowboy church (last night) that said he always hung his deer in his garage until it started to mold before he butchered it, I've done this before and as long as you can control the maggots it is a good cut of meat.

My point is you can hang a cut of meat longer than you think you can. If it doesn't smell bad it is eatable and that can be several weeks after the kill in my neck of the woods.
 

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I don't hunt yet, but forgive me for asking why you wouldn't just strap the deer to the quad and get it to your permanent hanging hook???

Though I have to admit, that assumes you're hunting on your own land instead of someone else's or state game lands.
No I would do that but deer hide is a real pain in the remove. I was thinking of a quicker way to do it when you get it home.
 
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