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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone have any suggestions on a cure for my Fiances "limpwristing". I have taught her the weaver stance, pushing with left and pulling back with right hand. She's a lefty. She is having a failure rate of about 50%. I thought maybe it just glock related, but had the exact same experience with the taurus's this week. She is getting upset, becouse she must requalify soon, Looks like i might have to buy her another .357 revolver.She is proficent with a revolver, enough to secure her level 3 security, but I wanted her to have more shoots, and when the revolver went away, I thought it was a great time to get her a nice auto. Oh, yes, she a small but strong woman, i just don't know how to help her. Any exercises or drills will be appreciated. She's getting frustrated, and when momma aint happy, well you guys know the rest......
 

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Maybe try having her wear a wrist brace so she is conscious of her wrist.

I never had that problem shooting, but I did have it when learning to carve. I started wearing a brace and once my muscles got used to the feel, I was able to remove the brace and continued to hold the chisel correctly.
 

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"Limp wrist" is a good way to shoot revolvers as it doesn't make you absorb the recoil but with an auto you either have to have a firm grip or use the hottest loads the gun can withstand. To cure the "limp wrist" there is an exercise that you can have her do. Take a 1" wood dowel about 10" long and dril a 1/4" hole in the middle. Thread a 4 to 5 foot piece of para-cord through the hole and tie a knot in it. Hang a weight (about half the weight of the gun is good to start with but you can go lighter if it is too hard) from the end and with your arms out in front of you roll the weight up on the dowel. like a spool) Then unroll it using your wrists only. (an alternating action roling the dowel with the right and then with the left. Start with ten reps and when that gets easy add weight. Keep adding weight until she can do the ten reps with twice the weight of the gun easily. That will cure her limp wrist problem.
 

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...She is proficent with a revolver, enough to secure her level 3 security, but I wanted her to have more shoots, and when the revolver went away, I thought it was a great time to get her a nice auto... She's getting frustrated......
If she's comfortable and good with a volver, perhaps she thinks you're not proud of her and she don't like you pushing her into trying other stuff
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice PaulS, will deffinately try that one, and The wrist brace will be tried also. LuckyJim, the revolver was stolen, And she has it in her mind that "auto's jam", so I am currently looking to replace her revolver. So, you may be right on the money too. I need her to requalify soon, so if I can find a .357 Ruger, Im on it.
 

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Without seeing her form its hard to see potential problems but if you are having trouble with the weaver stance maybe try a different one or modify the weaver like this

Left hand shooter so the left arm is almost straight, take the right elbow and drop it and turn it in slightly toward her belt buckle. The point is the off hand will be pulling back and slightly down as well. That may give enough support to compensate for the weak wrist.

Also not sue of her grip but try alternating between thumbs straight ( pointing down the barrel) and thumbs wrapped and see if that makes a difference.

Also try the off hand fingers wrapped at the 2nd knuckle instead of the first, this will look proper if the palm of the off hand covers the bottom of the clip.

The point being there really is no perfect form, only the form that works for you.
 

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Only 1 cure working on gripping the weapon once down it willnot be an issue again
 

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I use a stance with handguns that works for me, whether is officially approved or not. Instead of a bent elbow and the corresponding bent wrist I keep my elbow locked straight, my wrist locked straight, and get a cheek weld on the shoulder of my shooting arm. Just as if my shooting arm was the stock of a rifle. My support hand is exactly that - I cup my hand under the hand holding the weapon, elbow bent, forearm parallel with the other.
I also put the "wrong" foot forward, like I'm shooting a rifle.
I have been shooting handguns this way for 50 years. I never knew it was "incorrect" until a few years ago. In order to become a member of a police range I had to take a day long course taught by cops. Tactics, safety, range commands, Florida state gun laws, etc. My trainer kept trying to teach me some kind of Weaver or some such, but the head guy watched me put my rounds right where they were supposed to be with my Colt Government Model and said to let me be, I was doing good (I mean, how hard is it to miss at a mere 7 yards?).

Try this, it just may cure limp wristing. By the way I'm a lefty also.
 

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Yes, when I qualified with the .45 in the service the range master wanted me to shoot isocolies (sorry wrong spelling but basically feet spread 90 degrees from the target, both arms straight out and centered on your chest).

I was always a big weaver fan as it shows less body toward your attacker and I get better patterns. Gawd he chewed my ass all the time as when they said "target" I would switch to my position from HIS and scored expert.

Haha, fortunately we were both senior NCO's at the time so he gave me some slack.
 

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I teach the push and pull method. After a firm grip is obtained, then push with the dominant hand and pull with the weak hand. Balance the force between the hands equally.
 

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As a female who finally jumped over this hurdle, I feel for her. Everyone kept stating "you have limp wrists" like it was a physical handicap and I just kept trying, all the while believing that's what it was. I use the push pull method. I was having stove pipes and failure to feeds with .380s. I completely stayed away from larger calibers. I could, however, put a shot from a revolver right where I wanted it. Finally someone said something that clicked. My son suggested that I was not "locking my wrists and hands like a unit" and "allowing" the recoil to happen absorbing it in my arms. When I locked my hands I did so at the front of my grip, not at the wrists and guess what? My wrists locked in place, taking the emphasis off my wrists.

I'm sure this is basic stuff to all of you but after I started to visualize keeping my hands and wrists in place like a unit, allowing the entire unit to pull up from the elbows if necessary after the shot has left the gun, my problem vanished. I was so keyed in on keeping everything in place even after the shot, I was holding a death grip. Let the recoil happen, the shot has already left the gun at that point, that was a big concept for me.

I think the limp wrist diagnosis is bad terminology. It didn't explain the problem to me at all. I was squeezing the heck out of that gun and couldn't imagine how I could be any stronger. I can now shoot any caliber gun. The moral of the story is everyone stated I had limp wrists. I had no idea how to correct that problem but to squeeze harder. (That gave me tired limp wrists). The other thing that came to me as soon as I started operating with my "unit" was balance of the gun. I finally started shooting larger frame guns and was amazed that if I put pressure on the grip with my palms, I had greater control and my wrists weren't so important.

Don't assume she knows how to grip the gun. I'll bet she is trying to control the gun with her wrists. They aren't limp, they are just the wrong tool for the job. Ill bet she has got a death grip on the gun and her only idea on how to control limp wristing is to squeeze harder. Show her how to control the gun with her grip. Hope this helps.
 

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Shooting at bland targets might bore some people and subconsciously create weak grip problems, so a GET MAD motivational approach might help by regarding a paper or plywood target as a real-life zomb who's coming to eat you and your kids, that'd sure as hell strengthen anybody's grip!
This German military training clip illustrates the tactic, the instructor tells the pupil to GET MAD and scream a string of cusswords at the "zomb" at 1:05-

 
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