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I have just purchased a large internal frame back pack from Bass Pro that i am using for my BOB. I have been reading a book called "Build the perfect bug out bag". It has a lot of invaluable information. I am wanting to know what some of you are putting into your BOB that you think is critical. So far for my BOB, I have purchased some first aid supplies that i will pack as soon as a find a small enough container or some water proof bags to cut down on weight. It is only myself that will be bugging out for now. I have thought of some freeze dried food, dried fruits and nuts for my food supply. I am not totally sure on the amount of water. I am thinking 4 or five liters will be a good for the first few days with a small water purifier. I am trying to stay within a budget on my BOB. I have saved more on the side for one handgun or rifle later on. Any suggestions about clothing or cooking gear will be welcome.
 

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Shelter, water, food, fire, tools for gathering and building small items and protection. Shelter can be a double wall tent or a tarp that you can make into a small lean-to. 1 gallon of water per day per person minimum. You can get or make a solar still or buy a filter system but you should have a way topurify any water that you collect. Food is the tough one because you need twice the calories that you normally require and you want balanced nutrition that tastes good and you are used to eating. Fire starting equipment varies from individual to individual but the science id the same. You need dry wood to get a fire going. In some locations (like where we back-packed as kids) even in the middle of summer it was hard to find dry wood, so you have to know where to find it and how to make it work. The tools section depends on your skill level but should include rope, small wire for snares, fishing line (from light to heavy - its not just for fishing), hooks, knives, hatchet, shovel, and the basic screw drivers and pliers (leatherman). Toilet paper, washcloth, towel, soap and a good firstaid kit. Defense should contain at least a pump 12ga shotgun and a 22RF rifle that is pump or bolt action.
To that you can add your favorite hunting rifle and pistol.

Getting it all together will do you no good at all if you don't have the knowledge and determination to survive, so practice with your gear, learn about the edible plants in your area and the edible wildlife - things that don't walk to things that might eat you if they get the chance.
If you start feeling like it isn't worth it just look around you - all those living things have survived for millenia under the same conditions that you have before you. If they can do it so can you. Hug a tree - they are warmer in the winter than the air and cooler in the summer. If you can't get your arms all the way around it then it has been in that spot waiting for you for over 100 years.
 
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All the years of back-packing I never carried either of those items. I use liquid dish soap in a squeeze bottle and the refreshing glacial runoff to keep myself clean and fresh. It usually took about two minutes to clean up and 30 minutes before I could feel my legs again. The soap is biodegradable and made to rinse freely.

After you use those baby wipes anyone and anything can smell you for a mile down wind. The unscented soap is a lot better - even if the water is a bit hard on you.
 

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Well this isn't something so much for your BOB, but earth worms for protein. Soak them overnight to get the gunk out, then dry them out, and then grind them into a powder for a soup broth. Also toe-nail clippers, as you need to take care of your feet. Additionally charcoal is useful for sanitation and is a byproduct of your campfire. I am more a scavenger of what is available rather than what I can store and carry.

I am designing a light pack under 20lbs, as framed packs are often to heavy and cumbersome IMO. I also recommend a slingbow for hunting, particularly smaller game as it is easier to process, and cook, plus easier to find a squirrel, or turtle to cook when everyone else is going after deer, elk, or each other's livestock.
 

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Ways to clean water
food for at least a week - and then ways to get more food. hunting/fishing/trapping/foraging
several ways to start a fire
survival tools - knives, hatchet, etc
way to defend yourself - handgun, etc.

there are a lot of other things, but those should get you started
 

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First you have to look at where you are and where you will like have to go and any alternate . What goes in my bag may not suit you.
If I were not carrying I would have a fire arm and some ammo others may disagree. In my case I may have to get out of Milwaukee, That could be a task even if S don't hit the fan.
For me a B.O.B is a tool to get me where I need to be nothing more.
 

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One thing often overlooked is cash. Yes, in a total collapse it will be worthless. But I believe the odds are much greater that you will be able to use your cash in an emergency situation, at least at the beginning.
 

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If you're looking for purely "the essentials" I did a post on my website asking "what is the one thing any good BOB can't be without?" to 10 experts who run some of the biggest survival/prepper websites and blogs online.

The consensus seemed to be:

1. Water and something to treat water with
2. A good multi-tool (Leatherman Charge TTi was suggested)
3. Duct tape
4. Solid knife
5. Means of protection (gun, bow, machete, etc.)
6. Protein Source (food)
7. Fire starters (matches, lighter, flint & steel)
8. Knowledge and proper mindset

I think if you cover all of those to start you have a great foundation. Then you can start adding the odds and ends stuff to really fill out your pack
 

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Not my concensus.

1. Good pack
2. Good sleeping bag/pad
3. Shelter, bivy or tent
4. Water, containers and way to treat it
5 cooking gear (stove, pot, spoon, etc.)
6. headlamp
7. fire, a couple of ways
8. food, about 10,000 calories/5days
9. Clothes (minimum windproof/waterproof outer shell, hat, mittens, fleece top in cooler climes)
 

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@mjfdrums,
Like you've heard, food, water & purification method, shelter, security and important documents. Look at your BOB as a resource that can help you even if the S*#* never hits the fan. Pack maps and compass with multiple routes to your safe destination. If you can think of it, have the room and can afford it then I saw pack it. You can always take it out later if you have to abandon your car.

Good Luck!

PS I forgot Lights & Fire!
 

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Practice, Practical, Practice...All the nifty stuff out there, be sure you can properly use them. And superglue....starts fires, seams ripped skin, make small repairs.
 
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