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As a former Fleet Marine Force Navy combat Corpsman and CASEVAC (CASualty EVACuation) Corpsman with desert experience and a combat first-aid instructor...I ask this question.

You have the bandages but do you know how to use them effectively? There's more to it than you think (but something is still better than nothing so at least try!). If you can find a workshop around you to give you hands on, real world instruction I highly recommend you jump on it. Medical equipment designed in a lab or on a computer program won't always perform as designed in the field so it's good to find out the in's and out's.

If anyone in the Dallas/Ft.Worth, TX area is interested check out DTS North Texas - Defeat. Treat. Survive.. I'm not on here trying to plug my biz but I started this biz because I do believe in it and to get the skills and message out to folks like us because one day we may be hunkered down side-by-side slayin' zombo's and if I go down...who's gonna patch ME up!? Just get the propper skills somewhere. :)

Knowing how to effectively patch someone up with a pressure bandage, combat tourniquet, needle decompression or a crike is just as important as the other skills of prepping. I say be well rounded and be prepared for anything!
 

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I volunteered at a local fire station when I was living in Maryland years back - trained as an EMT. Mostly because I wanted to learn those kinds of skills.

Check out your local fire or rescue team. They are always looking for volunteers and it is free training, etc.
 

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Been through the Combat life savers course more times than I can count. Along with many other ones . No doctor but I can take care of a few things. Sadly been tested in the real world.
 
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In our Mutual Assistance Group which consists of 4 families we have once-a-month training meetings. Each family has specific assignments and responsibilities for all emergency situations. We have seriously considered each individual's skills and areas of expertise and made these assignments accordingly. I think we have had 17 of these meetings so far (in 17 months) and 9 of them have been on the topic of medical readiness for our group. I have 100% confidence that every one of our group has as much or more training than the typical EMT and our supplies and equipment is second to none. Every member has completed training in using operating room equipment and each person is competent in closing deep wounds with sutures, staples, and butterflies. We have practiced on hogs, goats, rabbits, chickens and any other kind of animal at our disposal. We have set aside one entire small barn as our medical treatment center. Lots of work has gone into this old goat barn to make it as clean and cleanable, as situation ready, and as well equipped as possible. We have spent lots of money on getting this room ready and I must say it's nearly as good as any military field hospital I have ever worked in during my 12 years in the service.

We also plan to repeat all of the training sessions over and over again without end.

Something that one of our members has stepped up to teach (and has done a wonderful job) is ACCIDENT AVOIDANCE. You know, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure". The most common problem in a crisis situation is simple hand injury. Next is foot and leg injury. An example is a simple cut finger or sprained wrist can result in total incapacitation if not treated properly and quickly. These minor injuries are the kind that we sometimes overlook until they result in reduced capacity or, in SHTF situations, could easily lead to death. Remember that in crisis situations cleanliness and sanitation is often either overlooked or not available.

I highly recommend that every one of us take all the time and effort necessary to learn as much as possible about medical concerns. It really is a mater of life or death.
 

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I have mentioned it on this forum before, But I am a paid/vol. EMT of 13 years I have been on ALOT of 911 calls so I am confident I have the ability to take care of myself and family/friends, I have been buying up all the Medical supplies I can, So I feel I am well covered.
 

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I was a volunteer fireman for 8-1/2 years and a First Responder for 5 of those years. Got some good hands on time. I'm no doctor/nurse, but I'm glad for the little training I got. Training is good, but actually doing it in an emergency is a different ball game.
 

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I have a son that is a doctor and lived at home while going through medical school. I assisted him in his studies and learned a lot. He has since taught me quite a bit though I've had some serious injuries in my life from gun shot wounds to even more serious things. I learned a lot from the doctor's that treated me as well. My son help me setup a medical kit to handle what I can do which is pretty extensive now according to him as to tending wounds as well as stitching them up if required, CPR, even a tracheotomy if needed which I had done to me once. He showed me the procedure which I actually picked up also. I would say I'm as qualified as perhaps a military medic which is where he started in the Navy Seals as their medic.
 

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I would say I am more qualified, having had more clinical experience than any of my group. But the extent of it is an awareness of sterile procedure, PPE, and basic lifesaving training for clinicians and as a lifegaurd.

I can give injections, stitch up a wound, and immobilize a patient and I am willing to do something, anything I can to save life. But I am limited.

Any recomendations for paper libraries? EMT textbook maybe?
 

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I have the basic millitary medical traiing and some real life experience with having to deal with serius wounds, this monday the entire school, over 400 people had a 20km ski trip, me and one of my friends were slacking in the back as usual because we like taking it calm and enjoying the nature, then in on downhill his staff broke and it made him lose concentration so he crashed into a tree, I quickly gott him out of the bushes and took of his headwear to see ow serius it was and he had gotten half of his left eyebrow ripped off by a branch, I had quite a lott of medical gear in my backpack so i cleaned the wound, stopped the bleading and bandaged it as good as i could, then i gave him a couple of painkillers before he passed out, Luckily a teacher had heard his scream and we managed to gett in contact with a ranger station and they sent a helicopter to pick him upp.
- The moral of the story: If your going skiing with a Lebanese guy then bring medical supplies :p
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have a son that is a doctor and lived at home while going through medical school. I assisted him in his studies and learned a lot. He has since taught me quite a bit though I've had some serious injuries in my life from gun shot wounds to even more serious things. I learned a lot from the doctor's that treated me as well. My son help me setup a medical kit to handle what I can do which is pretty extensive now according to him as to tending wounds as well as stitching them up if required, CPR, even a tracheotomy if needed which I had done to me once. He showed me the procedure which I actually picked up also. I would say I'm as qualified as perhaps a military medic which is where he started in the Navy Seals as their medic.
Started as a SEAL Corpsman? Rah!! That's some high speed training!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I would say I am more qualified, having had more clinical experience than any of my group. But the extent of it is an awareness of sterile procedure, PPE, and basic lifesaving training for clinicians and as a lifegaurd.

I can give injections, stitch up a wound, and immobilize a patient and I am willing to do something, anything I can to save life. But I am limited.

Any recomendations for paper libraries? EMT textbook maybe?
Yeah man, head over to Half-Priced books and they have a ton of stuff for dirt cheap. I have lots from the military but I also wanted an herbalistic approach to health and well being because one day I will be my family's only doctor. I was finding books for 5 and 6 bucks!! (Grey's Anatomy, the thick book was under $10)
 

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Started as a SEAL Corpsman? Rah!! That's some high speed training!
Yes he did 8 years active duty and 2 years reserve starting right out of high school. He is now a doctor in NC and got interested in medicine as a Medic for the Seals. Now he works for a hospital now as head of their trauma center. He worked for a local fire department as a para medic while he went to school to become a nurse practitioner then worked at that in a Homestead, FL hospital until he became a GP. I have actually learned a lot from him since he got out of the service though I don't see him but a couple times a year now with me living in Kentucky and him in NC, though we do talk often on the phone. He also did some time in NC as a Medical examiner for one of the near by counties there.
 

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I'm an RN, and I was a first responder in a rural area. I used to carry ACLS certification. I'm retired now. First aid is essential, but, as a survivor, what we will lack is tertiary care. Not having a hospital presents a problem. A lot of deaths will occur from problems now easily treated, such as dehydration from diarrheal disease, which will be common without good water sources. Pneuomnia complicates a lot of colds and flu, imagine no way to treat it. Urinary tract infections that travel up to the kidney. A small cut can kill without antibiotics. One really needs IVs and antibiotics minimally to have much of a chance long term. Any one who needs medication to survive now on a regular basis, say, Insulin, or cardiac meds better be thinking how they plan on acquiring it after armageddon.

I still believe one of the most credible threats to our survival right now, is a pandemic. It's not glamourous or action packed, but, it is overdue.
 

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One can buy antibiotics online from overseas--no RX needed
Sure many fish antibiotics can be used on human's and are readily available in a lot of place such as a good local pet store. That is just one source however their are some natural sources to fight infections and such also. The Aloe Vera is a good example of a plant with many healing features but others are others that work also. Here is some info on it Aloe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia There are a number of books on herbal medicines that do work though not as effective as some modern ones they have been used for centuries with good result.
 

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I do have basic first aid skills, and have had training in basic first aid. I can handle most commonly encountered issues, such as cuts, punctures, burns, fractures, etc. I can manage to stabilize most injuries, but I am not medically trained, so I would look to pass a patient off for such serious work. I know CPR. I can suture and splint. I have a lot of emergency first aid supplies, but I am still working on getting more. I know enough to survive. But Dr. Kildare I am not.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
One can buy antibiotics online from overseas--no RX needed
When that runs out make your own silver (an anti biotic, fungus, virus). I treat my family with ionic and colloidal silver. Love it! (If you're interested Google SilverLungs Generator)
 

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I can do CPR and put on a band aide...

But my wife is a trained first responder...
 

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ive gone to CLS a few times, have the book to refresh at time & remember most of it. BUT i know it is still only a temp. fix until a medic gets there
 
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