Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone just go out and buy worms to put in their garden? I've heard of people doing this and they said they had the best crops all year round because of this. prepperlog folks what you say?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I know a lot of people here in Ohio that does this practice on their raised garden beds. I do not know the effects, but it seems like everyone here is doing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
My neighbor has a "worm farm". I think I'll talk with him this weekend about the possibility of creating a compost or if he has ideas on putting these in compost. I couldn't stand the fact to "eat" a worm, but I would if I had to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
Hello,
You don't have to go out and buy anything unless your supporting a local business. Get a nice piece of cardboard and put it down just about anywhere, wet it down and come back in a few days. Pull it up and then you should have plenty of worms for you needs. I do this before a fishing trip I'll lay down 2-3 different spots and usually get a couple dozen or so. Good Luck!
 

·
Mod Squad
Joined
·
2,260 Posts
Older thread, but I'm so sick of seeing my name up there for the "Tip, Prepping for free..." thread.

Worms are a gardener's best friend. I don't buy worms, but I do try to attract them. You can take a 5 gallon bucket, drill 8 or 10 X 1/2" holes around the sides near the bottom, and bury the lowest 4" or so in your garden beds. Throw your kitchen waste in there and put the lid on and worms will come for the free meal. They really like watermelon rinds and will reproduce like crazy if you feed them some, but any organic stuff will do.

Worm farms (or vermiculture) usually use a special kind of worm called a red wiggler or compost worm. Worm castings are one of the best fertilizers, and the liquids they produce are an excellent all-around plant tonic. YouTube is full of info about vermiculture, and it could be well worth doing since their poop retails for almost a buck a pound.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,028 Posts
The worm trails aerate the soil, and allow better penetration / saturation from rain and watering. Down side is the movement of the worms draws moles. Moles like to eat roots almost as much as they like to eat worms and will F things up faster than ants at a picnic. Good news is a good dog will get rid of your mole problem! Bad news is he'll dig your garden up like a steam shovel doing it. Boy, nothings easy is it?!? :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,692 Posts
Dont know for a fact, but my grandpa (the smartest man I know of, and had never led me wrong) told me that when I got my haircut, to ask for some of the hairtrimmings, so he could get rid of a mole in his garden.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top