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Hi

I just found out about dry canning using mason jar + oxygen absorber method. i think most of the forumers here knows how to dry canning using this method propperly. i don't have a vacuum sealer.

my question is:

- Does the jar need to be sterile before dry canning?
 

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Don't be mislead by the term "dry canning". True canning utilizes high temperatures to sterilize the jar, food, lid, etc. With everything sterile, the food can not spoil. It eventually might not taste real good at 10 year old but... "Dry canning" is more of a way to store dry food products (rice, beans, and the like) in a way that will preserve their nutritional value and taste. It can not and is not designed to sterile food. In "dry canning" the oxygen is removed thru a couple of different methods to prevent the food from oxidation and the loss of food value. No oxygen in the container also prevents other bad things from going on including killing off bugs.
 

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OP........Go ahead and invest in a vacuum sealer. IMHO, they're well worth the $.
I've sealed rice, flour, and other stuff for long term keeping. Place the sealed bags in a Tupperware tub in a dry atmosphere, and they should keep for quite a while.
 

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OP........Go ahead and invest in a vacuum sealer. IMHO, they're well worth the $.
I've sealed rice, flour, and other stuff for long term keeping. Place the sealed bags in a Tupperware tub in a dry atmosphere, and they should keep for quite a while.
Hi

I just found out about dry canning using mason jar + oxygen absorber method. i think most of the forumers here knows how to dry canning using this method propperly. i don't have a vacuum sealer.

my question is:

- Does the jar need to be sterile before dry canning?
I'm not sure why you would do this instead of using 5 gallon food grade buckets? About 40x the storage capacity for 1/10th the cost of using jars.
 

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I use 5 gallon and 1 gallon aluminized mylar bags and put them into the 5 gallon pails for ease of storage and handling.
 

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I'm not sure why you would do this instead of using 5 gallon food grade buckets? About 40x the storage capacity for 1/10th the cost of using jars.
Let's think outside the prepper's mylar lined bucket here for a minute.

I am about to order a 50lb bag of of flax seed. This will last us about 1 to 2 years.

Tell me why I would want to store that in a 5 gallon bucket? I don't.

I also don't want to leave it open to the atmoshere for 2 years.

I have several #10 and 1/2 gallon mason jars. If I divide this bag up into jars I can open a new fresh jar every month or so.

OP........Go ahead and invest in a vacuum sealer.
A vac sealer will buy a pile of O2 absorbers.

Does either have a real advantage over the other?
 

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Hi

I just found out about dry canning using mason jar + oxygen absorber method. i think most of the forumers here knows how to dry canning using this method propperly. i don't have a vacuum sealer.

my question is:

- Does the jar need to be sterile before dry canning?
The jars don't have to be sterile. Only reasonably clean.
 

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Considering I have the vacuum sealer which is kind or expensive, I'd probably go for the jars and oxygen absorbers. One reason I use the aluminized mylar bags is they wont break very easily, the "ziplock" type reseal after opening, the aluminized coating keeps the sunlight (ultraviolet) out. I'm in a very low earthquake potential area, but I still prefer the bags. To each his own, I guess. Oh! Almost forgot, the oxygen absorber will create a light vacuum when the oxygen is consumed.
You can also use plastic (PETE only, like soda bottles, etc.). They do not let oxygen defuse thru the bottles wall like polyethylene does. If you store in a dark place, you don't need to worry about the sunlight, like I do.
 

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I'm not sure why you would do this instead of using 5 gallon food grade buckets? About 40x the storage capacity for 1/10th the cost of using jars.
Was crunching some numbers and it brought me back to this.

2 dozen quart or 1 dozen half gallon jars are 20 bucks or less or $3.33 per gallon.

1 bucket costs me $4.5, lid w/gasket(not a gamma) $3.5 and a mylar bag is ~$2.00 for a total of $10 or $2 per gallon.

That isn't a real significant difference in price especially if the smaller quantities work better for the user..
 

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While mason jars can be resealed or at least capped after opening, I use 1 gallon and 5 gallon bags for different types of stored foods. I even spent a couple of pennies extra and went the the "ziplock" type bags so I could reseal (not for long term storage but to keep bugs out) them after opening them. With bags and pail, I don't worry about breakage, or degradation from the sunlight coming thru my basement windows.
 

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After opening a bag of 02 absorbers I heat seal the bag they came in and then store that bag in a canning jar...but I've never used 02 absorbers with a canning jar...interesting

If you are storing dry goods beans rice pastas etc...and the jars seals are good you could remove the 02 with the absorbers. The problems I see with using canning jars are that they are fragile, take up more storage space and do not block light transmission. You would have to store the jars in such a way that they are not exposed to light and protected from breaking.

The heat seal mylar bags and food grade buckets are simply the best for long term storage, because they effectively block light, won't shatter and take up less space...I suppose one could use canning jars yet there are far better ways of going about it...
 

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The heat seal mylar bags and food grade buckets are simply the best for long term storage, because they effectively block light, won't shatter and take up less space...I suppose one could use canning jars yet there are far better ways of going about it...
Claiming they are the best is simply opinion. Frankly, IMO, #10 steel cans are the best but one has to weight convenience, cost and what they can work with to determine "best". Mason jars and steel cans are impervious to oxygen. Mylar is not.

I also just did the math on quart and 1/2 gallon mason jars as well as a stack of 5 gallon buckets I have. Quart jars take up the least space and 5 gallon buckets the most with little difference in between. That said I can by far infill an area tighter with quart jars. I only need 4" to stick another quart jar in I need 12"+ for another bucket.

Quart and 1/2 gallon jars measured in their original cases:

Quarts= 400 ci/gal

1/2 gals= 417 ci/gal

5 gallon pails= 432 ci/gal

;)
 

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I agree, for Seneca the pails work great, for me, the pails work great. What works well for one person does not mean it will work for you. As always, do your own research, talk with others, and maybe give the different methods a try before going hog wild. New jars with necessary good, flat, undamaged seal areas will cost more than an old flat iron for sealing the bags. If you buy used jars, check the top of each jar carefully for nick, cracks or chips, the lid won't seal on these. But my use of nitrogen in packaging (like commercial establishments but not necessary) costs extra. Jars are more susceptible to breakage if mishandled or in an earthquake, but can be capped up after opening and tossing in a new oxygen absorber will start the process all over again, not so with bags. The 5 gallon pails protect my bags for normal handling and they are easy to care. For my purposes, I don't care about cubing out a space to max. Since I buy new lids to use on the pail I get from a bakery (free to $0.50 each, lids $2), they are air and water tight and could be buried, stored outside, etc. Talking to my sister (experienced with my mother's canning) try not to go over 3 high for quarts, 5 high for pints and 7 high for half pints with thin plywood between each layer. Over the years she has had some come unsealed because of the weight. One year she had a bottom jar break from too much weight and the entire stack of 3 high, 3 deep and 6 wide came crashing down. She also warns about using old salad dressing quart jars because while they seal ok, they are not as strong as mason canning jars and seem a little more prone to cracking. Ok to use if not stacking. Since basement storage is usually a bit damp, she doesn't store jars in cardboard boxes because they eventually give way too.
The following is a quote from http://www.usaemergencysupply.com where I buy my supplies.
"In food storage, particularly for the long term, Mylar is commonly found as a laminate with Mylar as the top layer, a very thin aluminum foil in the middle and one or more other types of plastic films on the bottom acting as sealant plies. This laminate combination possesses a high resistance to the passage of oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, other gasses and water vapor and is what makes it valuable for long term (15 -25 year) packaging with oxygen absorbers. The slight amount of oxygen capable of diffusing thru the bag would be absorbed by the oxygen absorber. Commercial packaging companies usually nitrogen purge the bags prior to sealing so as to extend the life of the oxygen absorber without increasing the size and therefore the cost of packaging. Unfortunately, it has a poor puncture resistance so it must be used as an interior liner for more puncture resistant containers rather than as a stand-alone package."
 

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If you want to experiment without spending much money, take a few canning jars and used lids (rings, of course), clean them well, then introduce your food product. For easy observation and low cost, start with a salad from lettuce. Why not? Compare it to the lettuce in your fridge and see if it keeps longer under vacuum than otherwise.

To introduce a vacuum, fill the jar, leave about 3/4" air gap at the top, put on the lid and ring, then pop a hole through a SMOOTH area of the lid with a thumb tack. Cover over -- LIGHTLY -- the hole with a square of black tape (electrical tape). Don't press it down hard, just sort of lay it over the hole. Then use one of those inexpensive vacuum pumps that they sell for the specialized zip-lock bags, place the head of the pump over the piece of black tape and pump rapidly. It will be hard at first, then get a bit easier. Pump about 15 times to evacuate the air from the jar. The tape will lock down and seal off the pin hole. Jar will be under vacuum. Test it by popping the lid, hear the hiss. Re-seal and see what happens.
 

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Claiming they are the best is simply opinion. Frankly, IMO, #10 steel cans are the best but one has to weight convenience, cost and what they can work with to determine "best". Mason jars and steel cans are impervious to oxygen. Mylar is not.

I also just did the math on quart and 1/2 gallon mason jars as well as a stack of 5 gallon buckets I have. Quart jars take up the least space and 5 gallon buckets the most with little difference in between. That said I can by far infill an area tighter with quart jars. I only need 4" to stick another quart jar in I need 12"+ for another bucket.

Quart and 1/2 gallon jars measured in their original cases:

Quarts= 400 ci/gal

1/2 gals= 417 ci/gal

5 gallon pails= 432 ci/gal

;)
Mylar bags and buckets is what works best for me, para is absolutely right what I expressed is my opinion...good luck to you sir...
 

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Was crunching some numbers and it brought me back to this.

2 dozen quart or 1 dozen half gallon jars are 20 bucks or less or $3.33 per gallon.

1 bucket costs me $4.5, lid w/gasket(not a gamma) $3.5 and a mylar bag is ~$2.00 for a total of $10 or $2 per gallon.

That isn't a real significant difference in price especially if the smaller quantities work better for the user..
I want to live where you are as 12 quart jars are $14/doz here which the throws off the number by half.

I believe quart canning jars and 5 gallon buckets will be of equal value when th SHTF

Yes not everything is stored in 5 gallon pails. I would not put flax, fresh vegetables or meat in them as they have a short shelf life or would not be preserved as well as in glass containers.

It will take a balance achieve perfect prepper harony

Hmmmmm ......
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The reason i wanna do dry canning using oxygen absorber is that it's hard to find mylar bag here. but mason jar sold here. food saver is kinda expensive. so as alternative, canning jar + oxygen absorber is a good way for me to store dry food. While finding supplier that supply mylar bag, i think for now i store dry food using this method first.
 

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I would think the company you get the oxygen absorbers from would also carry the aluminized Mylar bags????
 

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As you use "dry" canning remember that there are also anerobic bacteria that don't like oxygen and live quite well in oxygen free environments. Some of these bacteria will kill you. Pressure canning is all I would use for meats and vegetables. Dried foods are good only as long as you can keep them dry and out of any light. Most "dried" foods still contain 30% moisture and will only keep for six months or so without preservatives.
 

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As you use "dry" canning remember that there are also anerobic bacteria that don't like oxygen and live quite well in oxygen free environments. Some of these bacteria will kill you. Pressure canning is all I would use for meats and vegetables. Dried foods are good only as long as you can keep them dry and out of any light. Most "dried" foods still contain 30% moisture and will only keep for six months or so without preservatives.
Indeed! One would think that "dry" canning means for dried goods only, peas, beans, dehydrated foods, etc., never actual veggies or fruit packed wet. And, in that case, why bother with the canning part, except to have a way to keep them dry? Farmers, for centuries, have been dumping grain into ROOMS and storing it that way, and if the need to "preserve" food is wrapped around the idea of having food stores in stock to extend life out to 30 years or more, then you are already dead, for if one does not learn to become sustainable on the land, no larder of stores is going to handle the problem.

As for the use of certain sized jars for canning (quarts and pints for instance) verus large quantity canning (gallons, kegs, etc.) the biggest issue is being able to heat completely through (not just get it hot) to the temps that preserve food free of bacteria. Test after test (modern tests in the university setting) have demonstrated that the home canner CANNOT reliably cause canned food to be safe outside of the guidelines established for safety. Botulism is no joke and it is the reason that more people don't can their own food -- not because it is that rampant, but because the potential ALWAYS exists in home canning. Further, antiquated canning guides have also proven to be less than adequate for any number of reasons, food products that are lower in acid, differences in water quality, etc., etc., etc., so using grandma's canning recipies may not be a good solution these days.

That being said, I am all for food preservation techniques that span the ages and that have proven reliable beyond a fault. They are more typically the fermentation, acidification, or drying of goods versus canning, which is a relatively recent invention (Napolean is thought to have caused the invention so his troops could be supplied at long distances).
 
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