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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi guys,
actually I've been hearing for so long about safes and how the safe is really important in the house. but since I don't have as much precious metals or jewelry or even that much cash as to think about finding a secured place to store them in, I've never thought of the idea. at the same time so many people give a genuine advice that everybody must have his own secured safe inside his house. is it really worthy?
 

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When I married 25 years ago, bought a home and knew the rug rats of my siblings would be coming over I bought a safe, then another one. When I became a serious prepper one of my early purchases was a hand truck. In a rush bug out I can just put the safe down on the bottom of the truck bed.
 

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I own a safe and it gives you peace of mind. It's not just for theft protection, my safe is rated at 90 minutes at 1400 degrees. I keep my guns, my wife's jewelry, and anything that can't be replaced. It's water proof and a temperature controlled environment. My safe weighs 1200 pounds and I filled the bottom with ammo and silver. I do believe the house could blow away and the safe will still be sitting there.
 

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Well worth it for the peace of mind, IMHO.
I have a gun safe for weapons, ammo etc., and a small hidden safe for important papers.
My 'safe' is a biscuit tin, I'd like a real safe but the big problem with safes in plain view is that they'll be the first things burglars grab.
I live in a 3rd floor apartment and there's nowhere I could hide one, pity because if there's a house fire my biscuit tin might not stop the paper money in it from getting toasted
 

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actually, upon personal experience, a safe, speically the fireproof safe, is so important for saving some crucial things that are present in every house such as emergency cash, family members' medical information, passports, insurance policies, birth certificates, social security cards, spare car and house keys, etc, such important things that must be secured enough because once you need any of them, they must come in handy and intact. the important thing here is to choose the right safe in terms of shape, size, and type is above all. I think the suitable solution for you is the fireproof and waterproof safe, sure there are different sizes and shapes and all you need is to make your choice according to your need and the place you have available to store the safe
take a look at Top Fireproof Safes | Fire Proof Safes I've seen a lot of safes types and sizes there

.
 

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@Lucky Jim, I agree with you, before purchasing a safe you must have a secured place that best fits the safe's size and shape.
if your safe is rather small, you may simply put the safe in a closet, preferably in a locked slot inside and this can protect it from being grabbed by the burglar.
some people may prefer the wall safe, prepare a suitable storage place cut into a wall, and then the safe is concealed by an unobtrusive door or even a size-fitting drawing.
and for houses that are still underconstruction, it could be planned to locate the safe under the floor and then perfectly conceal it by the flooring, of course this applies to small safes better.
 

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I know one guy who has a safe, bolted down and everything, but keeps everything hidden in he house in those fire "safe" boxes, plus a safety deposit box at the bank for documents.
 

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My brother and his long time girlfriends doublewide burnt to the ground about two years ago with nothing salvaged but their little fireproof safe that held the paid off deed to their property along with other documents as well as some jewlery and cash.The whole exterior of the safe melted off to the asbestos/flame retardant liner,the lock even melted to the point the key would not go in it.When we busted it open,everything was intact and undamaged.Thier insurance covered and they was promptly back on their feet.

We now own two.
 

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In a SHTF situation, . . . you can leave your main base with a safe, . . . and at least hope that something may be there when you get back, . . . foraging, berry picking, hunting, trapping, etc.

Without the safe, . . . you have to hide, un-hide, . . . every time you go out, . . . and that gets old quick.

I have it for other reasons also, but I like that extra safety.

Oh, . . . and if you decide you want one then, . . . might be tuff to come by, . . . get it while you still can.

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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I have two of them for everything important to me and my family. Do your homework. Take a close look at fire rates. You don't have to buy the highest price one, but don't buy the cheapest either. Good luck.
 

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I have two of them for everything important to me and my family. Do your homework. Take a close look at fire rates. You don't have to buy the highest price one, but don't buy the cheapest either. Good luck.
Buy a bigger one than you think you need. You will add more and more to the contents as time goes by.
Bolt it down to a concrete floor.
 

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Absolutely the safe is worth the expense if only for peace of mind. I bought mine last month and it's probably one of the smartest investments I ever made. I keep all but 2 of my guns in it (they're secured also but allow faster access if I need them) plus my knife collection and important documents. Anything I deem irreplaceable goes in the safe. Back ups of computer data go in the safe, whatever cash I may have, ammo, kids savings bonds, etc. There's a myriad of reasons to own a safe and the only one I could come up with not to was the price so I bit the bullet and bought it. What I learned in the process: 1) Buy a good one and check the warranty, Mine is guaranteed for life and it's transferable, Liberty will pay the freight in the event they need to replace the safe. This is important since freight is very expensive on a 700lb+ safe. 2) Buy bigger than you need since you'll probably keep finding stuff to stick in the safe.

-Infidel
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
actually yes, I heard about the great ability of the fireproof safe to resist against very high temperatures and even fire for quite a long period of time. for me, I decided to bring a fireproof and waterproof safe to put my important documents and other valuable things in.

@LucianoPavarotti: Thank you! i found the webpage you mentioned really useful, the great variety of safe types and sizes is wonderful, and I'm making my choice about which one to get from the site.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thank you all guys, you gave me really useful ideas and helped me make the right decision.

@LucianoPavarotti Thank you! the website you suggested is amazing! and I'm making my decision there
 

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In theory banks are the best bet to keep our cash and valuables in, but the risk is that in a time of national emergency the Govt would probably order them to lock their doors in our faces to stop us getting at it (like Greece did) so I use the '3 eggs/ 3 baskets' strategy by splitting my cash into 3 and keeping around a third in the bank, a third in a biscuit tin at home, and a third in my wallet.
That way i'll only lose a third if the bank shuts, a third if i'm burgled, and a third if i'm mugged.
Hopefully if the bank closes and i'm burgled and mugged it won't all be on the same day..;)

PS an anti-burglary tactic I use it to leave about 40 GBP/60 USD in notes and loose change on a table at home in full view in the hope that a burglar will grab it and run off to spend it rather than push his luck looking around my place for more
 

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In the US, banks are a joke. When you roll in all of the service fees and what-not that they charge, you actually lose money. The CD and Savings rates of 0.25% do not keep up with the 3% inflation rate, but just to break even (not factoring in inflation) you have to have $12,000 to $15,000 in the bank just to get your interest to offset the fees.

A. If I have $15,000 - I'm not putting it in an account that gets 0.25%. It goes in a Money Market or investment account that gets 5% to 8% - beating inflation and getting me a little extra.
B. Why would I put $15,000 in a bank that could fail and collapse and at the very least restrict my access to the funds in the event of an "event."
C. If I followed Jim's fantastic advice, I'd be rolling around with $5,000 in my pocket. I'm not comfy with that (still its a good idea Jim). I don't mind it hidden in the house but not on me.

I have got to think that banks are the worse option for your money.

We have three safes at home.
1. A gun safe for... My entire collection of Farmers Almanacs and New York Phone Books.
2. A 1.3 cuft fire proof safe for documents and important stuff.
3. A brief case safe. This safe is empty 99% of the time, but if we bug out (or flee hurricanes when we were in Houston) this would keep all of our documents, some cash, and a small back up gun.
 

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Not all banks charge fees. I haven't paid a fee in many years. The interest rates on savings accounts do suck, though.
 
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