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Discussion Starter #1
Short Answer: Probably not.

I can't think of many "tactical" situations where a prepper would want to engage at extreme range. Anything over 6/10th of a mile away doesn't pose an immediate threat, and most terrain makes such a shot unlikely anyway. And hunting at those kinds of ranges is iffy at best, and more likely to wound rather than kill your target. That would most likely lead to a long track and even longer drag.

But you know what? I like having the capability.

I do a fair amount of bench shooting with bolt guns, just for fun. My new rifle is just past it's initial break-in, and is capable of about .5 MOA accuracy. With the right ammo, it's capable of printing 1.5" groups at 300 yards, (my local range's max) even if I'm not. I'm happy that I can shoot 2" groups at 200 yards, and confident that I can do better with practice.

So to me, owning a 1000 meter rifle isn't about shooting at 1000 meters. It's about the confidence that comes with having a system I KNOW will be 100% reliable and deadly accurate at any realistic distance that I might face.

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I don't need a 1000 meters, but I do need 749.08 meters which is 820 yards, and I've been practicing hitting a 5 gallon bucket or if the wind isn't bugging me a milk container at that distance. You see that is the range from my where I watch my front gate which is the only easy way on to my bug out property. If someone decides they want to open the gate I want to decide to disable their engine block.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Can you share some more details - rifle type, caliber, stock, and scope?
Sure. It's a Remington 700 SPS Varmint with a 26" heavy barrel, 1:10 twist, chambered in .308 Win.
Choate light tactical stock with full length aluminum bedding (this stock free floats the barrel) & Champion bipod
Weaver 20 MOA rail, Weaver 30mm 6 hole tactical rings
Falcon Menace 5.5-25 X 50mm Tactical scope with 30mm tube & front focal plane M-16 reticle (in Mils)
1/10th Mil tactical turrets, side focus, and sunshade and flip up lens covers
 
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The farther you can shoot the better. For general purposes most folks only need to shoot at 25 yards. I was a Police counter-sniper for 7 years. We trained at 100 yards. Military needs to reach out there a bit so 1000 meters is the benchmark with infinity being the goal. As an avid deer hunter I expect accuracy out to 300 yards from my light barreled 30-06. My wife an I will be moving to a farm where a 1000 meter shot is a real possibility so I'll be honing my skills in the coming months and buying a good bean field, heavy barreled and accurized 300 WSM. If I saw a monster 12 point at 800 yards and couldn't shoot I'd hate myself.
 

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For very close in tactical needs I reserve a Hi-Point 9mm carbine, for mid range a Saige .308, and for long range a Savage .30-06 with a Nikon Bushmaster scope. Not one of these is expensive but they have proven reliable and accurate with my handloaded rounds. If I can't do my business with those three I have several pistols of the .22, .357 magnum, 9mm, .40, and .45 ACP persuasion. If those bad deers can get through all of that then they deserve my seat at the table. That said, my .30-06 will work to 150-200 yards which is farther than I expect to need to reach out where I live.
 

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Would rather have it and not need it, than need it and not have it.
Mines a Armalite AR-30 in 300 win mag and as soon as I can find one a AR-50. 300 for cheap practice and the 50 for when it gets serious.
 

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All depends on where you love. 600yds is the longest distance I can see aroud here due to terrain. So having a 600yd rifle is wise. But spending the time with a laser range finder & knowing the ranges gives you a big advantage.
 

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Long range shooting is a kick but I don't want to trick out a gun to do that, and I agree most shots in my AO are max 300 line of sight.

I have practiced with my 300 Wby mag and a 3-9 shepherd scope at 800 yds off a bench was decently accurate with 190 grain Berger bullets. Last year I took my elk at 580 yards with my .270 win, but I guessed the running shot at 525 yards and hit low breaking its front leg.

Look at any ballistics chart for any rifle and most are surprised how much a bullet drops after 400 yards, the bullet drop is computed in FEET for each additional 100 yards you go out. I admire those that can hit MOA at 1000 yards but I'll not be shooting at extend ranges.
 

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I'm thinking if I can hit that bucket the guy standing next to it will think twice about opening the gate. I just want to be able to hit the bucket - did I say I need a bigger bucket - yes I am thinking about putting a blue barrel out there.
 

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I have four exterior ballistics programs that I use to choose my "point blank range" which is the rang at which the bullet path is never lower or higher than 1 inch from point of aim. I then take my gun and shoot it at those ranges to check if it matches the "ballistics" print out.

Most often I find my actual results are closest to the software that I wrote for DOS back in the early 80's. Some of the "professionally" prepared programs are off by several inches at 200 yards. I use a chronograph to get the actual velocity of my ammo and use the bullet manufacturer's ballistic coefficient for the bullets and input all the same data for each of the programs. I don't know what I did that was so much better but I am kind of proud of the results.
The unfortunate part is that I will never re-write the software for windows because it changes too fast to keep up with so it is useful only if you have a DOS computer. I just happen to have a dual boot Linux and DOS system that I use most of the time. Both are free operating systems that work very well on this old Gateway Pentium machine.
 

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Yes you do and you need to know how to use it. Or have someone behind it that can.
The farther your stand off range the better you chances of winning.
Long range shooting takes education ,you must understand the weapon the round and how to dial it in if you can do that you will hit the target.
1000 yard shots were common with 1903 3006 Springfield's.
That all said you fist priority should be a weapon you can use well, 0-400 meters and engage targets quickly.
 

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Ballistic tables/programs are only so good. Most don't go to 1000 yards/meters. I don't have a chronograph so I have to guess at velocity. I have a Leopold M8-Target on my long range varmiter (politically correct) I put a 100 yard zero on it then the fire it at 200, 300, 400, etc, out to 1000 and get my adjustment, both windage and elevation for each range and that goes into my shooting log. I have a little farm with a private road that leads down to a stock tank with a berm. It is my private 1000 yard range. I shoot a Sierra 168 g Matchking and a 175 g Spitzer. They both shoot to exactly the same point of aim out to 1000 yards, amazing!

Folks think accuracy is linear. It ain't. Any rifle that will shoot 1 MOA or less at 1000 yards is world class.
 

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Conversely Submitted for your consideration having had his vehicle disabled at long range and impressed with your ability to remotely apply power does he return with help under cover of darkness?
 

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I can shoot 440 yards on my property High point to fence row, 660 (measured from daft logic) from my bedroom window onto the neighbors field. My best rifle will do 7/8" 3 shot groups (3) different times I have done this and can not for what ever reason get a better group than this, me, wind or bench or a combination of the three) at 172 yards which is the distance from my picnic table to the fence row corner. This rifle allows me to squirrel hunt at 200 yards, ground hogs to 400 yards deer if I see them I can kill them. I have not found a range I can shoot at to get me further than 660 as there is no line of sight on our property greater.

I know the rifle will toss the round further, just don't have a need for it.
 

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Yep, my brother and I have had that discussion. Disabling the vehicle could spark bigger problems we know. You have to read the circumstances carefully, know where this consideration is made, etc. the gate we built would require an APC / Tank to drive thru and a simple 4wd with winch would have a slow and impractical time going around it. It is the first choke point we have. There are some parties at the gate we might just want to hit the bucket / barrell and expect them to move on. Others hitting the car / pick up may be prudent do they are on foot. Putting them on foot, no matter which way they go after might be preferable in our circumstances.

Conversely Submitted for your consideration having had his vehicle disabled at long range and impressed with your ability to remotely apply power does he return with help under cover of darkness?
 

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I have rifles that can reach out to 1000 yards, but I live where having to make a shot like that is very unlikely. We have a lot of trees.

1000 yard shots work out west where you can find flatlands between hills or mountains. There it makes sense to practice shots like that.

Where I hunt and shoot we almost never see a shot over 300 yards, and most shots are well inside 200 yards.

If I go into the mountains, I could shoot across valleys or up a valley that far, but game is usually hiding under trees, so your chances of hitting something that far away are very unlikely. When we hunt in the high mountains, you get shots that far away, but I do not take them because I believe it is not ethical hunting. Plus, you shoot an animal that far away, if you take them down it takes follow up shots (not how I hunt) and then you have to go retrieve the game and haul it out, not an ideal situation. If you were starving I could see it. But for fair chase hunting it is out of the question.

For self defense you could only justify a shot like that if you were being shot at first (perhaps...) and in duty to retreat states, you could not fire back legally if you could retreat.

In a WROL or a warfare situation, a long range shot may be a good way to end a threat. Any other scenario other than war or WROL, if someone is 1000 yards away, and I can move away, and/or get a closer shot I will do that instead every time. If being pursued by a group then it makes sense to try and dissuade them from pursuing and a few well placed long distance shots would do that, for sure.

I think it is good to know how to make such shots, but in practical reality, almost all of us will only use that knowledge on stationary targets on a static range somewhere, unless you live out West, or you get paid to shoot....

I would only shoot at 1000 yards if I went looking for a place where I could shoot that far. It serves no common sense purpose in my life otherwise....
 

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There's very few places around here to shoot at any distance, most ranges here are 100yds. I know of one range within an hours drive that's 200yds but it's a gun club so you need to be a member. There are no public ranges here. In this area you're not getting a 1000yd shot no matter where you are unless you're shooting mountain top to mountain top. Max you're going to get a shot around here is maybe 400yds and then only if you're in a field. If I were to defend my home I could maybe get 200yds line of sight, I'm confident I can hit a target that far out so a 1000 yd rifle is unnecessary for me.

Now, hunting in this area you're not likely to get a shot at more than 150yds or so and those are few and far between. Woods around here can get pretty thick so the odds of seeing a deer beyond 75yds or so are pretty slim. My personal feeling is if you've got a place to practice those long range shots go right ahead, it's a skill that will help make those closer shots a whole lot easier. I'm of the school of thought that you should practice at twice the distance of the shots you may be presented with and you should practice them from field positions, not from a bench. No bench rests where I hunt so I practice standing off hand, standing supported (a larger diameter sapling makes a dandy support) and sitting. Field position practice will definitely pay off in the confidence it builds.

-Infidel
 
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