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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wonder why I was unable to find modern revolvers with a design like the Nagant M1895?
Its design is interesting in that there is practically no gap and this has some advantages.
But the fact that this design has not become widespread makes one think that its advantages are not so great.
What do you think of this design and are you aware of modern analogues?
 

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To start off, that cylinder/barrel facing should not have any gap.
The cylinder is suppose to move forward and up against the barrel.
It is a lot of extra parts and movement for little gain in velocity.
Also the single point ejector is a compromise for sealing the cylinder.
I had one in here a while back for excessive gap, .010"-.012".
Caused by frame stretch, not worth fixing.
I will take any of my Smith & Wesson revolvers every day of the week.
Have HKS speed loaders that work real well with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It is a lot of extra parts and movement for little gain in velocity.
Thanks for the quick response!
I was no longer thinking about losing speed.
I thought that the lack of gap could be useful for safety when firing powerful ammo when the shooter made the mistake of gripping the revolver.
 

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Thanks for the quick response!
I was no longer thinking about losing speed.
I thought that the lack of gap could be useful for safety when firing powerful ammo when the shooter made the mistake of gripping the revolver.
The only problem I have ever seen was with someone nearby getting hit with lead fragments
from to big a gap, in this case a S&W mod 19 357 mag.
Nominal gap for all revolvers is .005".
Shooter should never have any part of their hands near the front of the cylinder.
I shoot S&W revolvers in .357mag, 41mag and 44mag, never have a problem.
 

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The Nagant design was complicated.
A standard revolver is easier to produce.
When buying a used revolver I always use a feeler gauge to check the gap. For 50 years I have had a nice brass feeler set made for setting valves in Chrysler cars, they are from .004 to .012.
For me, any gap from .006 to .008 is just fine.

Another thing i do is a quick check on cylinder timing. I fully cock the gun, then put a pencil down the barrel, butt end first, making sure it will freely drop onto the chamber without any hang up.
 
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Some of my first guns were revolvers, and I never worried about the cylinder gap. But then I got a Dan Wesson .22, with interchangeable barrel capability, so I had to worry a little.

I had a a Ruger .357 that spit lead or split the primer. I never quite figured out which, and I didn’t look too hard for the answer. It is hard to find a better gun than a handy sized .357 IMHO.

Right now, I want a Ruger LCRx, .357 Magnum, it would be a great carry gun.

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I had a a Ruger .357 that spit lead or split the primer. I never quite figured out which, and I didn’t look too hard for the answer. It is hard to find a better gun than a handy sized .357 IMHO.

Right now, I want a Ruger LCRx, .357 Magnum, it would be a great carry gun.
Yes, I see that 357 for you the magic number )
 

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.357 magnum is my favorite caliber also.
One of my pocket carries is a 357 snub nose, in the console of my truck is a full size 357.
I also have several single action 357’s I like to carry when woods walking.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
.357 magnum is my favorite caliber also.
In previous discussions, I did not quite understand whether .357 Magnum and .44 Magnum are the cartridges that can always buy in any weapon store?
So that when buying a gun, the owner knew that the cartridges for him would be everywhere like dirt?
If this is generally possible.
 

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No, they like others are not always available either.
The biggest demand today is for the 9MM Pars and 45 ACP.
There are alternates that can be used, 38Spcl. and 44Spcl.
The revolver ammo lasted a bit longer than the auto stuff,
With that auto stuff gone, sales shifted to revolvers and associated ammo.
Shortages may vary with locations.
I have two Smith revolvers in 357 and one Marlin lever in the same round.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
No, they like others are not always available either.
The biggest demand today is for the 9MM Pars and 45 ACP.
There are alternates that can be used, 38Spcl. and 44Spcl.
The revolver ammo lasted a bit longer than the auto stuff,
With that auto stuff gone, sales shifted to revolvers and associated ammo.
Shortages may vary with locations.
I have two Smith revolvers in 357 and one Marlin lever in the same round.
Thank you! It is interesting for me.
 
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