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A while ago a buddy of mine told me about cut shells. He said while hunting fowl if he came across a deer or other game, he would use a cut shell to bring it down. Now since the ammo shortages we've all seen, including slugs and 00 buck, this may be a good way to utilize all the cheap bird shot still on store shelves. I was reminded of this recently when I came across a youtube video titled "Lost art of cut shotgun shells". Its a good quick lesson and the guy, Buddy is pretty direct no BS. He also does a good video on making wax slugs. Anyway I thought I'd toss this out there. Anyone have any experience with this?
Have a great weekend all!

punch
 

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The video that will not die. I belong to many firearms and survivalist forums, and this crap has been circulating for maybe three years now.
This idea started years ago with paper hull shells, and you may get away with it using those. But plastic shells are a different deal.
Try this - try to fit the nose end of a loaded shell in the muzzle of your shotgun. Didn't work, did it?
Now imagine that same diameter, 1 ounce (or more) mass trying to fit through there at 1200 feet per second. You are darn right there will be a presure spike. A big one. Normal chamber pressure for most gauges is around 14,000 psi. That pressure, in a milisecond, will vastly increase.
You are holding this next to your head.
You might get away with this once, twice, five times, but sooner or later you will bulge the barrel. Or split your barrel. Or worse.

This ranks right up there on the stupidity scale with firing a 45 Colt round through a 410 shotgun.

To give an idea of how tricky interior ballistics can be, the chamber pressure of the .223 Remington runs from 40,000 to 50,000 psi depending on powder and bullet weight. Simply firing 5.56 NATO in a .223 chamber will increase this by 10,000 psi. This is why manufacturers of rifles with .223 chambers warn against firing 5.56 NATO in them.

Bottom line - firearms are designed around the ammunition to be fired. Fireams designers and engineers know what they are doing, and I'm going to stick with what they recommend. You can do as you wish.
 

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People cut shells before slugs were available. There is no reason to use them anymore. I would think that they could damage some chokes too.
 

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Yep, they can do it with their guns but I won't do it with mine. If you've ever seen someone blow the barrel on a 12ga you wouldn't want to try it either. I've seen it a couple times when I used to shoot trap, wad gets stuck in the barrel and the guy doesn't notice it and then loads another round behind it. Down right scary, luckily I've never been on the line when it's happened. This is a practice I wouldn't recommend.

-Infidel
 

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Herington richards single shot heavey barrel 12 gauge, have fun, you have a mini cannon.

Years ago their were not regulations like there are now, and there was not an internet for the experts to give advise.

In a survival situation, will I cut shells or worry about the posibility of a pressure spike,

I will cut shells,

I don't do it now because I do not need to.
 

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When I was working as a firearms instructor at the academy we taught this to the trainees. We would do this through a Remington 870 and it was single loaded, not cycled. The birdshot or buckshot round was cut through the hull around the wad. It's an old trick and I had mixed results with it. It was fun to see the half of a shell tumbling toward the target. It is one of those think outside the box, only if I had to things.
 

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I've shot many a cut shell out of a bolt 12 gauge, most were hot reloads. I know the principle and am unafraid of them. I have never used paper hulls for cutshells either.
 
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