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Some of the most interesting firearms I've seen have been antiques. For example... A black powder double barrel shotgun, A lever action Henry with a brass receiver & octagon barrel (not the modern version) and one my father had given me when I was a kid. It is a Merwin & Hulbert double action, .32 S&W long, 7 shot revolver circa 1860. The workmanship is incredible. I don't even know how they made something so precise back then.
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Some of the most interesting firearms I've seen have been antiques. For example... A black powder double barrel shotgun, A lever action Henry with a brass receiver & octagon barrel (not the modern version) and one my father had given me when I was a kid. It is a Merwin & Hulbert double action, .32 S&W long, 7 shot revolver circa 1860. The workmanship is incredible. I don't even know how they made something so precise back then.
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Yes the break top design was modified by Major George Schofield at the Smith & Wesson factory in 1869. He was looking for a faster loading gun than the Colts. However the first army issued guns which where issued around the time of the 1873 SAA Colt in 45 Colt the Schofield couldn't load the 45 Colt so the Army ordered a 45 Schofield round that was a bit shorter than the 1873 SAA but would work fine in the SAA. Both guns became standard issue with the Schofield round for both. Hence many that often call the 45 Colt round a 45 Long Colt as the Schofield would of been the 45 Short Colt though it was always refereed to as the Schofield or Russian since S&W got the original design from Russia.

The Schofield is a good gun that is now made in true 45 Colt calibers as well as 44 Russian, 44-40, 36 Spl etc. Due to the design however they are somewhat weaker than the Colt SAA however.
 

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History of fire arms is full of amazing ideas and work. To bad our schools refuse to to teach it.
Colt had some failures in the early day but they did not give up and are still around today.
And yes we still call the 45 Cold round a colt long
 

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I'm one of those guys that just doesn't seem to find blackpowder or very old antique guns more interesting than a simple quick, "cool, that's really old". Kind of the same lackluster joy over an old building or statue. Interesting but only historically wise. I do find some older guns to be very interesting like the M14, but it's because it's such a capable rifle, built like they don't build them anymore. If it wasn't as capable though it wouldn't do as much for me like the Garand. Still a nice rifle and partly capable, but pretty far behind the power curve compared to todays weapons. The M14 while not perfect is still one hard hitting, magazine fed rifle capable of holding it's own in firepower, gear and optics with the new plastic guns.



 

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I always have a hard time with not having the perfect gun in my hands when a specific opratunity presents itself.

I want a semi auto .308 rifle on top of a semi auto 12 gauge under.

Where do I get one.
 

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I always have a hard time with not having the perfect gun in my hands when a specific opratunity presents itself.

I want a semi auto .308 rifle on top of a semi auto 12 gauge under.

Where do I get one.
Try Centerfire Systems.
 

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This is a very subjective thread. Cool guns to me are firearms that have a history or guns that changed the way we look at things. Surplus guns generally fall into one or both categories. The Garand for instance changed battle rifles forever, it was a high power, high capacity (for the time) semi auto gas operated battle rifle that could be quickly reloaded via enbloc clips. While a detachable magazine would make more sense in todays world, 8 rounds was high capacity at the time when compared to bolt guns with 4 round internal magazines. Without the M1 Garand there would be no M-14, or M1 Carbine or even the Mini-14/30. Pick up a surplus rifle and look at the scars that it wears and try to imagine where it's been and what it's seen.

I've also recently developed an affinity for lever guns, for me they hold a nostalgia of a simpler time. These guns are truly a marvel of innovative design for the their era. They can be had in chamberings from handgun cartridges to dangerous game cartridges and every one is a little bit different. My favorites? I have been lusting after a Winchester 1886 in .33WCF for years but it's a bit out of my budget, I settled for a Marlin 336 in .35 Rem and have not been disappointed.

-Infidel
 

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Fuzzee,
Who makes the stock on the M1A in you pictures?...
I have been in the wood and steel camp for a long time and think thats a great looking stock, I may have to tread into the polymer and aluminum world if they are making them like that...
 
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