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Another spice used frequently around here is Adobo, used for a lot of different foods.

I have the Adobo in 28 oz. canisters, several on the shelf, one last about 2 years .
Adobo is a great seasoning. I have to get it at the international store in Memphis. I use it in arroz con pollo (rice with chicken). When I first started making this dish, I also learned about annatto oil. That is a really neat oil used in Asian and Latin foods. It adds a nice subtle flavor but it mainly is used to color your food. It is a beautiful red color and really sets off rice dishes. It is sometimes called poor man's saffron.
 

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I found this at an Asian market and I really like it. Ginger and honey tea. That's all that's in it just Ginger and honey. And with a little bit of milk it's a great pick-me-up up in the afternoon


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Okay, @SOCOM42 you'll never guess where I was yesterday...or maybe you might! Did you guess the Chinese market? You did? You're right!!! I looked for the stuff you recommended the stuff that began with cot, the stuff that began with bun...Couldn't find any of it, plus with all the face masks, social distancing and language barriers, I thought to heck with it and grabbed the four things that looked interesting and went home. Hold on and I'll post what I found....
 

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The first one is called "Dan Dan Noodle Sauce", kind of funny name, right? It was really spicy. I could handle a little mixed with broth or something else. The second one

is called "Yellow Chili Sauce", sounds innocent enough, right? Well, lemme tell you I gave it the old finger lick just to try it out and my mouth started salivating like crazy.

Next thing I knew my head was in the toilet. I kid you not and no, I hadn't been drinking. So that one is going in the trash. I don't know what those crazy Asians are

doing with that stuff but it should come with some kind of a warning. The next one is a soy

bean paste and with a little of the Yoshida Sauce (Costco) I think it's a keeper. I can work with it. I haven't tried the one with the big number "3" on it yet...
 

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The first one is called "Dan Dan Noodle Sauce", kind of funny name, right? It was really spicy. I could handle a little mixed with broth or something else. The second one

is called "Yellow Chili Sauce", sounds innocent enough, right? Well, lemme tell you I gave it the old finger lick just to try it out and my mouth started salivating like crazy.

Next thing I knew my head was in the toilet. I kid you not and no, I hadn't been drinking. So that one is going in the trash. I don't know what those crazy Asians are

doing with that stuff but it should come with some kind of a warning. The next one is a soy

bean paste and with a little of the Yoshida Sauce (Costco) I think it's a keeper. I can work with it. I haven't tried the one with the big number "3" on it yet...
:vs_laugh::vs_laugh::vs_laugh::devil:

Yes, some of them are real hot!

Did you not know that most of south asians are called pepper guts for a reason, now you do.:tango_face_grin:

Hot chili peppers and related products are needed to combat internal parasites which are/were food born.

The products I listed are from Viet Nam others are from thailand I also have chineses and japanese spices and sauces..

The two I use the most of are measured @ a 1/2 teaspoon of each in the pot, and that is plenty.
 

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Here's something that I do with my preps: panini bread. You can put the dough in the press and lemme tell you it makes delicious flat bread in under a minute.


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I make tortillas using a press then cook them on grill on a cast iron griddle on top of the gas stove.

Only a minute to do them also.

I can do both corn and wheat flour ones when motivated to do so.
 

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:vs_laugh::vs_laugh::vs_laugh::devil:

Yes, some of them are real hot!

Did you not know that most of south asians are called pepper guts for a reason, now you do.:tango_face_grin:

Hot chili peppers and related products are needed to combat internal parasites which are/were food born.

The products I listed are from Viet Nam others are from thailand I also have chineses and japanese spices and sauces..

The two I use the most of are measured @ a 1/2 teaspoon of each in the pot, and that is plenty.
Yeah, pepper guts, lol. Those spices sure don't need refrigeration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #90 · (Edited)
Oatmeal stockpile can also be used for soups and stews!
It can be used as an alternative to recipes that calls for rice. Diabetes-wise, oatmeal is a better choice, and it helps lower cholesterol.

Icelandic Vegetable and Oat Soup

3 to 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 small yellow onion, finely chopped
1 medium leeks, trimmed and thinly sliced
3 to 4 garlic cloves, minced
10 cremini mushrooms, thinly sliced
3 to 4 medium carrots, cut into 1/4-inch slices
6 to 8 cups water or low-sodium vegetable broth
2 medium Yukon Gold potato, small dice
2 cups cauliflower florets
1 medium dried bay leaf
1/4 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
1 cup finely chopped kale (optional)

Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy bottom saucepan over medium heat. Once heated, add the onions and leeks; cook for 5 to 6 minutes, until the onions are soft and transparent. Add the garlic and mushrooms, then cook for an additional 2 to 3 minutes. Add the carrots and sauté for 1 to 2 minutes, just until lightly fragrant, then cover with 6 cups of water. Add the potatoes, cauliflower, and bay leaf and bring to a boil.

Reduce heat to low, cover, and cook at a simmer for upwards of 2 hours. After two hours, stir in the oats and kale and continue cooking for 10 to 15 minutes. Season with a few heavy pinches of sea salt and serve with fresh ground pepper.


Icelandic Vegetable and Oat Soup

Irish Beef and Oatmeal Stew

4lbs. beef chuck or brisket, cubed in 1/2" chunks
2 yellow onions, diced
2 tbsp olive oil
4 carrots, diced
4 ribs celery, chopped
2 tbsp garlic, chopped
2 qt beef stock
22oz canned diced tomatoes
4 bay leaves
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 tbsp REC TEC Grills Ben's Heffer Dust (a mix of spices for steaks)
1 cup steel cut oats

Pre-heat REC TEC Grills to 400℉ with a large cast enamel dutch oven.
Add the beef and allow to sear on all sides (about 8-10 minutes).
Add the onions, carrots, and celery and allow to set for 8-10 minutes.
Add the flour to form a roux and cook for 2-3 minutes.
Add the tomatoes, stock, bay leaves, and Heffer Dust, then allow to simmer for 20-25 minutes.
Add the oats and simmer for 20-25 minutes until tender.
Remove the bay leaves prior to eating.


https://www.rectecgrills.com/irish-beef-and-oatmeal-stew

Brotchán Roy (Irish Leek & Oatmeal Soup)

Brotchán Roy or Brotchán Foltchep is a traditional Irish soup made from oats, leeks and often parsnips and carrots and a staple in many households. Oats and barley were the primary grains of Ireland before wheat started running amok. Likewise, parsnips and carrots were the dominant roots before the humble potato appeared. Like so many soups, feel free to alter this recipe, try adding in leafy greens or young nettle tops. Though many recipes call for adding milk (as a part of the total liquid) I prefer to leave it out and allow the creaminess to come from the oats breaking down. The oats are sweet in nature so don't hesitate to use more leeks. Just the perfect comfort food.

4 -5 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 cup uncooked organic rolled oats
2 - 4 large leeks sliced and cleaned
2 Tbsp butter
2 large parsnips peeled and sliced
salt and pepper to taste
fresh parsley
cream or milk optional

In a medium pan or medium heat, bring the stock to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer and spring in the oats. Stir well to keep the oats from clumping. In a skillet, melt the butter. Add in leeks and cook over gentle heat until soft. Add leeks and roots to stock and simmer for 30 - 40 minutes or until roots are soft. Season with salt and pepper. Serve garnished with parsley, maybe a little cream and chives. Garnish with parsley.

Recipe highlights - Oats are sweet, warming and nourishing. They are one of the grains high in iodine and therefore they help regulate the Kidneys and thyroid. Also high in silicon, oats calm the nervous system, and they moisten the intestines. Warming and comforting they anchor they root the spirit. The leeks are mildly pungent and help drain damp, aid digestion. The roots are high in fiber and complex carbohydrates providing a long steady energy level. They nourish the digestive system and aid the Stomach and Spleen.


Brotchán Roy (Irish Leek & Oatmeal Soup) - Aprilcrowell.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #91 · (Edited)
This is an ancient Arab recipe (10th century). The author had substituted meatballs for ground beef. It is a very thick version of stew
(picture shows almost dry), made with oatmeal.

Oatmeal stew (Shoofan wlahmeh)

Here is my version, a bit heartier, with meatballs and carrots, using flakes. This dish could be made after Easter, if there are lamb bones leftover.

½ lb ground lamb or beef (or a lamb bone or two)
2 onions, quartered
2 (or more) carrots, peeled and sliced
1 cinnamon stick, 1 bay leaf, 1 carrot, 1 celery sprig, parsley, etc
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp allspice
½ tsp black pepper
1 tsp salt
4 cups water or meat stock or chicken stock
1 ½ cups oatmeal flakes (or steel-cut oats), depending on preference

In a Dutch oven over medium heat, brown the meat, sprinkling it with the spices. Add the onion, sliced carrots, water (and aromatics), bring the mixture to a simmer and cover the pot. Uncover the pot, simmer a while longer and taste to adjust seasoning. The idea is to get a flavorful broth prior to adding the oatmeal. When that step has been reached, drained the pot, remove the bay leaf and cinnamon stick.
Place the broth (and the meat) back in the pot, bring to a simmer, add the oatmeal, cover the pot to cook the flakes, adjust seasoning and serve. The consistency should be thick.

NOTE: Make sure the amount of broth is sufficient to cook the oatmeal flakes in, otherwise add more water as needed. If using steel-cut oats, add more water and allow thirty minutes to cook them. You can prepare this dish with just lamb or beef bones, discarding them at the end when they have flavored the broth.



Oatmeal stew (Shoofan wlahmeh) - Taste of Beirut

OATMEAL MUSHROOM RISSOTTO

5-1/2 cups vegetable stock
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 leek (white and light green part only), halved lengthwise then cut crosswise into thin slices
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 garlic cloves, minced
12 ounces mushrooms, chopped
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves
1 teaspoon ground dried sage
1/4 cup dry white wine
1 cup steel cut Irish oatmeal
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus extra for garnish
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, for garnish

In medium saucepan with lid, heat stock over medium heat until simmering, then reduce heat to low and keep covered.
Meanwhile, melt butter in a large high-sided skillet over medium-high heat. Add leek and salt; cook 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add garlic, mushrooms, thyme and sage; cook 7 to 8 minutes or until mushrooms are very deeply browned, stirring frequently. Add wine, cook 1 minute, stirring constantly.
Reduce heat to medium. Add oatmeal; cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Add 2 ladles of hot stock, cook until oats have absorbed almost all of the liquid. From this point, you'll just continue adding stock, 1 ladle at a time, and stirring. You do NOT need to stand and stir constantly, but you should stir frequently, so just do some other stuff around the kitchen while you linger. The oats should take about 25 minutes to cook (taste to make sure they are tender). You should have enough stock (be sure to keep the lid on it when you're not using it, so it doesn't evaporate!), but if you run out before the oats are tender, just add some water.
To finish, vigorously stir in 1/4 cup cheese. Serve in warm bowls garnished with parsley and extra cheese.

Home Chef Notes:

-chicken or beef stock may also be used
-any variety of fresh mushroom may be used. I used 8 ounces white mushrooms + 4 ounces "gourmet mushroom blend"
-use traditional steel cut Irish oatmeal, NOT the quick-cooking kind

https://foxeslovelemons.com/savory-mushroom-and-herb-steel-cut-oat-risotto/

Oat Risotto with Parmesan and Peas

Steel cut oats take the place of Arborio rice in this creamy risotto-inspired dish. It's actually less hands on than traditional risotto. For a different taste, try pecorino or Romano cheese in place of the parmesan.


https://oatseveryday.com/recipes/mains/oat-risotto-with-parmesan-and-peas/

For more oatmeal recipes:

https://fitfoodiefinds.com/the-50-best-oatmeal-recipes-on-the-planet/
 

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Discussion Starter · #92 ·
Good call on throwing out a can with bubbles. Bubbles are not normal and are a sign of a DANGEROUS condition. Throw any can that has bubbles - do not taste or smell . See bubbles in a can toss it in the outside trash where no pets of people can get to it , wash your hands and wash all posts/pans/counter/ floor that any of the material in the can could have gotten on.

Any cans bulging/ swelled or leaking - outside trash and wash your hands.
I just very recently read about BOTULISM. Now I really understand why your emphasis on hand-washing.
It's a really scary and deadly poisoning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #94 · (Edited)
Back to Spam!

SPAM-VEGGIES SALAD

Cut Spam in cubes, pan-fry and brown all sides. Set aside on towel paper.

In a big bowl, add cubed cucumber, whole baby tomatoes, red/orange/yellow sweet peppers sliced in cubes, sweet onions,
dill pickles (optional, sliced in small cubes), sliced black olives (optional), cooked pasta (bowtie or macaroni, or ziti, or shell - optional), chopped parsley (optional),
and the spam. Add the dressing and mix together. Let sit for about an hour before serving.

Dressing:
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil, 1/2 cup good quality balsamic vinegar (if you can, use the Kirkland brand), a little bit of garlic powder,
black pepper and salt. Stir to mix.

SPAM-CARROT SALAD

Cut Spam in cubes, pan-fry and brown all sides. Set aside on towel paper.

In a bowl, put grated carrots, raisins, green onions (optional), and the spam. Mix with the dressing.

Dressing:
Mayonaisse, honey (microwave together for a few seconds), season with salt and a little black pepper.
 

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I used canned ham and canned whole potatoes to make scalloped potatoes and ham.

I just sliced the potatoes, added some flour, butter, milk, ham & onion to a cast iron dutch oven. I sprinkled it with salt and pepper, then baked it until it looked like the edges were getting a little crispy. Yummy! **You can use evaporated milk, just add the same amount of water as you do evaporated milk. So you would use less evaporated milk than regular milk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #97 · (Edited)
PLOUGHMAN'S LUNCH

Originally a British farm worker's packed lunch - crumbly, cloth-bound cheddar, strong pickles and tough bread - the ploughman's was promoted as a quick, easy pub meal in the late 1950s as part of a campaign to get Britons to eat more cheese.
https://www.goodfood.com.au/recipes/ploughmans-lunch-20131010-2va97

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=ploughman...AADYo/gN46YKuxxBo/s1600/ploughmans+lunch1.JPG

Cheese
Deviled Eggs
Ham or Spam or Sausage
Pickled veggies
Apple
Chutneys or jams
Bread
 

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Discussion Starter · #98 ·
HARDTACK

Also called hard bread, ship's biscuit and even tooth dullers, hardtack has been a survival food for many centuries. The Ancient Roman army had a version of the hard biscuit, and Admiral Nelson's men had barrels of them on their ships. Here in America, we recognize hardtack from the many mentions of it Civil War letters, poems, and songs.

The basic recipe for hardtack always includes flour, water and perhaps a bit of salt or sugar. The resulting baked wafers have an incredibly long shelf life. Hardtack is, well, hard-and quite bland. That's why soldiers and sailors would soak them in coffee, soup, or grease to soften them up and make them more palatable.
Ingredients

5 to 6 cups of flour
1 cup of water
https://urbansurvivalsite.com/survival-recipes/

Check out the 5 easy steps to making hardtack.

What you will need:

5 to 6 cups flour
1 cup water
Rolling pin
Pizza cutter or knife
Cookie sheet
Skewer (a fork could work in a pinch)

Step 1: Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Pour the cup of water into a bowl. Slowly mix in the flour until it makes a hard dough you can't stir. When it gets to this thick stage, it is easiest to knead the dough with your hands to form a ball of dough.

Step 2: Lightly flour your surface and place your dough in the middle. Use the rolling pin to roll out the dough into a rectangle about half an inch thick.

Step 3: Use the pizza cutter to cut your dough into squares. The size of a saltine is a good size to aim for.

Step 4: Transfer the squares onto an ungreased cookie sheet. Use the skewer or a fork to poke holes through the entire thickness of each square. You can make rows of four or cover the area with holes as you please. It doesn't have to be pretty, but the goal of the holes is to allow the dough to cook thoroughly.

Step 5: Place the hardtack into the oven and cook for 30 minutes. Remove from oven and use a spatula to flip the hardtack to the other side. Cook for an additional 30 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool.

If you are storing your hardtack, it needs to be completely cool before you seal it up. The dough needs to be cooked thoroughly and dried out. Even a little moisture can spoil the hardtack. For long-term storage, it is best to cook the hardtack for an additional 30 minutes at a temperature of 250 degrees. Yes, it is going to be rock-hard, which is why it earned the name.

You can add a little salt to the dough for flavor. Topping the hardtack with raw honey or fruit preserves adds a little more flavor, making it more palatable. Hardtack can be dipped in stews or soups to help thicken them up and turn them into a more filling meal.

https://homesteadsurvivalsite.com/make-hardtack-step-pics/
 

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Discussion Starter · #99 ·
Chipped Beef over Toast (SOS)

Also known as s**t on a shingle, this meal is filling and simple. If you don't have dried beef, substitute ground venison, hamburger, or any other available meat.

Ingredients:

2 TBS butter
2 TBS flour
1 ½ cups milk
8 ounces dried meat (typically canned, chipped beef)
6 slices of bread, toasted
Salt and pepper to taste

Melt the butter in a pan over medium heat. Whisk in the flour, creating a roux. Slowly mix in the milk and stir until it boils and gets thick.

Add in the meat and cook until heated.

Place a toast on each plate. Scoop gravy over the top of each.


https://www.survivopedia.com/15-survival-recipes-from-the-great-depression/
 

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Discussion Starter · #100 ·
Stretched Scrambled Eggs

Here's a simple way to stretch eggs without sacrificing flavor.

Ingredients:

6 eggs, beaten
¼ cup flour
1/3 cup water
Salt and pepper

Whisk together flour and water until smooth. Add eggs and mix well. Season with salt and pepper.

Scramble like normal, until done.

Serve with a slice of bread, or with fried potatoes.


https://www.survivopedia.com/15-survival-recipes-from-the-great-depression/
 
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