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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
you guys seen non judgemental

I'm on the hunt for a beginners level compound bow, but I have no idea what I'm looking for and since firearm laws are so tight here, and expensive ($1200 for a s&w m&p 9mm) I'm looking at a bow for "first level" protection

any advice from your guys will be welcome

I'm 30 y.o. average fitness, 6'2 and "lanky"

I would assume that basic info helps

CHEERS
 

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Barnett has some very good beginner bows, both for children and adults. Do a search on these, and you should be able to find something in the $200 U.S. range.
 

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I agree wit the Barnett recommendation. And BTW the only stupid question is the one you never asked because it may very well leave you ignorant to the answer. As for the rest, you'll never find a better bunch to deal with. These guys can put up with me then your a shew in!

A buddy just bought this one and I am impressed!
Diamond Infinite Edge Compound Bow Package | Bass Pro Shops
 

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PSE is a good company as well.
I would advise finding a pro shop in your area. They will be able to help you find a bow that fits you. Draw length, draw weight are both things that need to be fitted. Once they do that they will be able to find you arrows that are splined to your bow and cut to the correct length.
If you do not get it fitted correctly you will not be able to hit the broad side of a barn.
 

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you guys seen non judgemental

I'm on the hunt for a beginners level compound bow, but I have no idea what I'm looking for and since firearm laws are so tight here, and expensive ($1200 for a s&w m&p 9mm) I'm looking at a bow for "first level" protection

any advice from your guys will be welcome

I'm 30 y.o. average fitness, 6'2 and "lanky"

I would assume that basic info helps

CHEERS
Work harder to save the money, budget better, and then figure out a way to get the gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Work harder to save the money, budget better, and then figure out a way to get the gun.
would love to, but gun control here is at a extreme, and has the possibility of getting worse...
 
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Find a local Archery shop, go in and try some. Most shops that want to help will have a small range and let you try a few to get the feel for it. Now with that My person preferred brand is hands down Bear. once you find one you like than it's all about practice, practice and more practice.
 

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I have a Matthews craze. It is adjustable in draw length and weight. I am 5'10"and it suits me just fine. It was about 700 with all the bells and arrows. For a beginner bow its extremely accurate. I also recommend going to your local archery shop to get an idea of what your looking for and pick one up on eBay. You will save yourself some money. And you can always customise the bow to your specs.
 

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Like the others said,first go to a pro shop and get fitted and shoot some. Do Not buy the first time.Write the measurements down. Sleep on it.Then shop around on the internet using the measurement/specs you wrote down. Get a price,compare it to the pro shops. Maybe you have some room to move on the price.

Buying from a pro shop is good, since being a newbie you will have concerns after a few weeks and pro shops give preference to the guy who bought hardware from them.
 

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I would look at the Mission Ballistic (Made by Mathews) set up. It comes with arrow rest, sights (4 pin I think), damper, bow quiver and retails in the US for well under 600 fun dollars. Its adjustable from 50-70 pounds of draw weight and has about 330 IBO speed and is very quiet right out of the box and gives up very little to bows costing twice that much in quality or amenities. Its a damned lot of bow for the money!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks for the info guys, i won't feel like such a dumb arse when I walk into a proshop, now I have some base knowledge, get professionally fitted, and with these suggestions, there is a lot of bang for buck in "middle ranged" priced bows, so the cheap ones are rubbish :)
 

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PSE is a good company as well.
I would advise finding a pro shop in your area. They will be able to help you find a bow that fits you. Draw length, draw weight are both things that need to be fitted. Once they do that they will be able to find you arrows that are splined to your bow and cut to the correct length.
If you do not get it fitted correctly you will not be able to hit the broad side of a barn.
What he said
 

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Cheap bows are rubbish - no matter how much they cost but there are some inexpensive bows that are of good quality. With a compound bow you get to choose your materials and the look. It is, as has been said a few times, to go to a pro shop to be fitted and talk about the construction, let-off, and all the personal things that are fitted to you for the ultimate experience. The accessories can make a difference too. Things like a good release and the type of sight make the bow a lot easier to use.
 

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Go to a shop and get measured for draw length. Any competent shop attendant should be able to measure you and be able to recommend a draw weight. Don't fall for all the hype that heavier is better or faster is better. Native americans were killing 1,500 lb buffalo with short bows that averaged about 20 lbs of draw weight and averaged about 135 feet per second. Look for a used bow in your size range. There is usually nothing wrong with a used bow. In most cases the previous owner just upgraded to the latest model with all the new bells and whistles. Also a used bow may come fully dressed with a rest, sights and even a quiver. In some cases that could lead to $100-$200 in savings. Another advatage of going to a shop is that they usually have an indoor range for you to try a few shots to see if you can actually shhot the bow. They may even offer lessons at a nominal fee. Once you make your decision, do not skimp on arrows. Walmart sells carbon shafts for $3.50 each. While these may be good for a beginner who might lose more arrows than they hit the target with, if you are planning on putting meet on the table go with a quality name brand arrow with a good reputation. Practice with these as much as you can because bow hunting is all about muscle memory. If you can't commit to weekly practice, bow hunting may not be for you.
 

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After you get fitted properly from a pro shop hunt online. Every year about this time guys are selling last years latest and greatest bow all decked out for a loss just so they can buy this years latest and greatest. Top end set ups will run you $1200 plus but you can get the same set up used for $400 to $600. You can find some great mid range bows set up for around $300.
 

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Never could get the hang of a bow, takes a lot of practice. Once they started allowing crossbows to hunt in my area I bought a descent compound crossbow for about 300. Very accurate, fairly easy to learn with some practice. I have mounted a red dot on it for fast target accusation. In the end I am going to purchase a compound crossbow has they are much easier to maintain.

Thought another option might help.
 

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Do yourself a real favor here, find a range that lets you try the bows they carry. Shoot a Bear, Shoot a PSE then after 30 minutes on both move to a Hoyt or Matthews. You will find yourself saving for a good bow. You said you would save for a gun if the gun control laws were not so restrictive a good Hoyt will run about 1000-1200 but it will never let you down and shoots fast and accurate.
 

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I bought an old Hoyt mystic rebel off ebay for $50, it has a sight and an arrow rest. I see a lot of these older bows going for cheap and most any name brand bow that is still serviceable will be good enough to hunt with or at least learn with.
 

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The problem I see with buying a used bow out of a pawn shop or e-bay is the fact that you have no idea how it was stored and cared for. The older bows while they can still be serviceable without question is that after about 15 years getting replacement parts can prove challenging.
 
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