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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all!

Im totally new to this forum but been basically obsessed with the whole prepping, getting away from the big cities, gardening and self-sustainability over the past 6 months or so..

We are in our Young 30s and my wife and I come from small ish cities 100K.. but since we've been married we've moved to the large metro cities like San Diego and now in Las Vegas. and are TIRED and want peace with nature in our life, and value the wisdom in growing food!

That said, I know I see sooo many people moving out and buying acres where it rains a ton! like south East, FL, TX, TN or etc. for their rainwater, etc. I definitely understand that, Makes perfect sense!!


However, we were wondering if food could grow well also on the South West if your logical about it, and you try to avoid where there is absolutely no water around you and risk of drought, but rather next to a consistently flowing clean water river?? There is some nice smaller towns and country sides along the Colorado River, and also quite cheap.... but still in the desert.

We would like to be closer to family IF possible..but would gardening and growing our crops be successful here just as much as it would be.. say in Texas, Georgia or Florida??

Anyone doing it or have know??



I know there is alot to learn, but right now, we would like to decide at least on a location and focus on buying the land... Any help would be appreciated!!!
 

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Hey all!

Im totally new to this forum but been basically obsessed with the whole prepping, getting away from the big cities, gardening and self-sustainability over the past 6 months or so..

We are in our Young 30s and my wife and I come from small ish cities 100K.. but since we've been married we've moved to the large metro cities like San Diego and now in Las Vegas. and are TIRED and want peace with nature in our life, and value the wisdom in growing food!

That said, I know I see sooo many people moving out and buying acres where it rains a ton! like south East, FL, TX, TN or etc. for their rainwater, etc. I definitely understand that, Makes perfect sense!!

However, we were wondering if food could grow well also on the South West if your logical about it, and you try to avoid where there is absolutely no water around you and risk of drought, but rather next to a consistently flowing clean water river?? There is some nice smaller towns and country sides along the Colorado River, and also quite cheap.... but still in the desert.

We would like to be closer to family IF possible..but would gardening and growing our crops be successful here just as much as it would be.. say in Texas, Georgia or Florida??

Anyone doing it or have know??

I know there is alot to learn, but right now, we would like to decide at least on a location and focus on buying the land... Any help would be appreciated!!!
I grew up gardening in western Washington where water is always plentiful. Then we bought a place in eastern Washington where the annual rainfall is approximately equal to that of Tucson, Arizona. Off the top of my head, these are the differences I've noticed."

1. The soil is just slightly too alkaline.

2. The soil lacks organic matter.

2. Composting can be difficult. Even in a closed container, it's hard to keep the organic matter moist enough for effective composting. In addition, there's not a lot of natural vegetation to supplement green matter from your garden, i.e., I haven't found a way to make enough compost to make my garden sustainable, because #2...not enough natural organic matter in the soil.

3. The amount of water required for good growth is almost unbelievable, even with heavy mulching. Again, see #2.

4. Some food crops won't set fruit in really hot temperatures so you might need to adjust your thinking about when growing season is. (Not really a drawback, just something to keep in mind in Nevada.

That's all I can think of off the top of my head. Hope it helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I grew up gardening in western Washington where water is always plentiful. Then we bought a place in eastern Washington where the annual rainfall is approximately equal to that of Tucson, Arizona. Off the top of my head, these are the differences I've noticed."

1. The soil is just slightly too alkaline.

2. The soil lacks organic matter.

2. Composting can be difficult. Even in a closed container, it's hard to keep the organic matter moist enough for effective composting. In addition, there's not a lot of natural vegetation to supplement green matter from your garden, i.e., I haven't found a way to make enough compost to make my garden sustainable, because #2...not enough natural organic matter in the soil.

3. The amount of water required for good growth is almost unbelievable, even with heavy mulching. Again, see #2.

4. Some food crops won't set fruit in really hot temperatures so you might need to adjust your thinking about when growing season is. (Not really a drawback, just something to keep in mind in Nevada.

That's all I can think of off the top of my head. Hope it helps.
Hey paulag1955 thanks for the response!

These are Good solid notes for sure! Atleast for me, as I am still learning and know nothing of gardening yet. Definitely helps to start to understand what is needed and what to perhaps avoid.

Was East Washington desert land similar to Arizona also?

I'd really like to know if it's possible or anyone doing it.. or its a crazy though that would never work..

Thanks again!!
 

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Hey paulag1955 thanks for the response!

These are Good solid notes for sure! Atleast for me, as I am still learning and know nothing of gardening yet. Definitely helps to start to understand what is needed and what to perhaps avoid.

Was East Washington desert land similar to Arizona also?

I'd really like to know if it's possible or anyone doing it.. or its a crazy though that would never work..

Thanks again!!
The area of eastern Washington where we're located is not technically a desert; it's a shrub steppe, but that may just be a semantic distinction. Most people probably think of it as high desert. The main difference between eastern Washington and Arizona is the Columbia River. I wish we had water rights. My neighbor over there has a small garden that's pretty successful (other than her blueberries) but her soil is more powdery than sandy (mine is sandy) and holds a lot better. She doesn't even mulch. So even within a small area, the gardening conditions are pretty different. The area has cooler summer temps than Las Vegas. We have no months with the average high over 100 degrees, although we do get a fair amount of days over 100.
 
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