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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just thought it would be interesting to hear from users who graduated in their chosen subject/career and has it had any positive or negative situations? Such as, for example, being told too overqualified, not enough experience etc.
Has anyone ever gone back to college/university and studied something else because maybe job market has been tough?

Current Students: what do you like/dislike about your chosen studies? Do you have worries about future etc re career? Backup plans? Let us know. Older users may be able to help and advise etc. (non patronising of course; I’ll roar at them.)

If you’re happy to share, please feel free. Age is irrespective as title says past and present; share thoughts experience and can see the changes of today compared to back then. Just a bit of fun, please don’t post names of universities etc, standard rules apply.

I’ll post in a bit — having a whisky :cool:
PS: only posted this here as subject of topic is college - anyone can join. ;)
 

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I tried college, but my major was beer and girls.
So I ended up in the US Army instead. I was given an excellent education, but the career field for trained killers is rather narrow.
🤣
 

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I knew what I was going to do since I was a freshman in high school.
Growing up during the computer revolution, it was starkly apparent to me that this would not be a passing fad. The world would run on computers, and I was going to program them.
It's a solid industry, unlikely to be automated until we actually crack artificial intelligence. That won't happen to any sufficient degree to push me out of the job market until I'm retired.
So my college path was pretty clear. I started on the CSE path but physics and cal2 kicked my butt, so I did the next logical thing and switched to business school. Got my degree in InfoSys and was hired almost immediately out of college by Lockheed Martin. Bounced around a bit ever since, but same field and still booming.

To current or soon-to-be college entrants, if you don't have a plan for how your chosen degree is going to support you with a career, you don't have a plan at all.
Don't go to college because "it's expected". Go to college because you know what you want to do with your life, and you know how you're going to achieve it, and you've concluded that a degree is mandatory.
If you don't know what you're going to do, or you don't require a degree to be successful in your chosen field, DON'T GO TO COLLEGE! It's a huge investment in time and money. For most, it's just a waste.
Since universities have been turning into indoctrination camps for the past 3 decades, they really should be avoided if possible.
 

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I tried college, but my major was beer and girls.
So I ended up in the US Army instead. I was given an excellent education, but the career field for trained killers is rather narrow.
🤣
After 4 years of Varsity Football, starting as a linebacker from year 2 on, starting as fullback from year 3 on, gaining 1049 yards in 200 carry’s year 4, I was a number 2 draft pick out of high school.

May 1970 - Graduated High School
Jun 1970 - Uncle Sam picked me #2 in his draft.
Jul 1970 - Started the become a Medic path.

College was pretty much out of the picture for me at that time.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I knew what I was going to do since I was a freshman in high school.
Growing up during the computer revolution, it was starkly apparent to me that this would not be a passing fad. The world would run on computers, and I was going to program them.
It's a solid industry, unlikely to be automated until we actually crack artificial intelligence. That won't happen to any sufficient degree to push me out of the job market until I'm retired.
So my college path was pretty clear. I started on the CSE path but physics and cal2 kicked my butt, so I did the next logical thing and switched to business school. Got my degree in InfoSys and was hired almost immediately out of college by Lockheed Martin. Bounced around a bit ever since, but same field and still booming.

To current or soon-to-be college entrants, if you don't have a plan for how your chosen degree is going to support you with a career, you don't have a plan at all.
Don't go to college because "it's expected". Go to college because you know what you want to do with your life, and you know how you're going to achieve it, and you've concluded that a degree is mandatory.
If you don't know what you're going to do, or you don't require a degree to be successful in your chosen field, DON'T GO TO COLLEGE! It's a huge investment in time and money. For most, it's just a waste.
Since universities have been turning into indoctrination camps for the past 3 decades, they really should be avoided if possible. Proctoredu is the only bright spot in the whole testing system :(
I am also getting more and more sceptical about higher education. On the other hand I see no alternatives :( I don't think that, say, home education can be a reasonable replacement, my opinion.
 

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After 4 years of Varsity Football, starting as a linebacker from year 2 on, starting as fullback from year 3 on, gaining 1049 yards in 200 carry’s year 4, I was a number 2 draft pick out of high school.

May 1970 - Graduated High School
Jun 1970 - Uncle Sam picked me #2 in his draft.
Jul 1970 - Started the become a Medic path.

College was pretty much out of the picture for me at that time.
I know what your avatar represents, many others here probably don't.
Anyone with the CMB is a hero in my book.
If i haven't said it before, Welcome Home, Brother.
 

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I’m not a hero. The guys had my back, I had theirs. Three have their names on a wall in DC. Intellectually I know I did everything I could do to keep them alive. But it took a while to reconcile myself to that reality

You know the scene in “The Guardian” when Costner said the only number that mattered was the number he couldn’t save? It was like he stopped, turned to face me and said “You know exactly what I mean don’t you?”
Eerie.

Back at you on the welcome home.

Since 1986, anytime I see someone wearing the hat or a T-shirt I ask if they were there. If the answer is yes I say:
“Once upon a time;
many, many years ago;
in a land far, far away;
the guys all called me Doc.
Welcome home Brother/Sister. “

Over the years I’ve had three vets tell me I was the first non-family member to welcome them home.

I had the honor to say that to a Frozen Chosin Marine in front of his GrandChildren and his Son. I told them that he would tell them he was nobody special but that anyone who was a part of that was a stone, cold, solid hero in my book.
 
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I managed to afford college thanks to a loan and the Pell grant. I got my Associates degree in electrical engineering. Looking back I find that Job experience is weighted more heavily than a degree but having that check marked for having a degree opens doors for you even if you don't go into that field. Also there are some things that you learn in college that you can use for the rest of your life, I would suggest trying it out for a semester or two to anyone who hasn't been just to be able to write "some college" on your resume and to take the general studies 101 courses. See if it is for you then pick a major later. Also taking a short course here or there for a certificate then going straight to working is a viable option if money is tight.
 

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After 4 years of Varsity Football, starting as a linebacker from year 2 on, starting as fullback from year 3 on, gaining 1049 yards in 200 carry’s year 4, I was a number 2 draft pick out of high school.

May 1970 - Graduated High School
Jun 1970 - Uncle Sam picked me #2 in his draft.
Jul 1970 - Started the become a Medic path.

College was pretty much out of the picture for me at that time.
Wow..highly similar story for me but I was a pretty competent defense tackle since 7th grade four of high school and a couple at collge to avoid gettting killed in the rice paddies. Decided to be a Texas Highway Petroleum in 70 with a draft notice in my pocket after laying out a semester..they were drafting folks left and right out of the 4 month long school...but the guy who ran it said he would send a letter to anybodys draft board who was in danger and mine gave me another student deferment till the hitting high in the lotto ball drawing for 20 year olds in 71? Spent 37 years as some version of a cop. Got saved at age 40 and and went to Bible College for two years and they gave credit for previous hours and gave me a BA in Pastoral Theology. Started a small Church on graduation which lasted for a while..but didnt prosper for several reasons...then several years trying to dispense Biblical Counseling by email on the internet and ran a Christain oriented Regnegade BBS ..not that any young folks ever heard of those. Currently I claim to the the head Preacher of the Church in my backyard which sometimes poses as the mancave. The name of the Chruch is "Nine Acres Bible Church," which is what its predecessor was called. Anybody who clowns around on Fake Book is welcome to pop by to our online ministry called..Christianity What do you think? We dont mind arguing with lost sinners over there.
 

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In today's economy, I think college is only valuable for certain fields where you want and expect a high degree of specialized education: particularly: engineering, medicine, architecture - these are also fields that cannot really be replaced through automation any time in the foreseeable future. I graduated in 2008 with a degree in architecture, right at the worst of the recession. Not a SINGLE job in my city in my field to be found - and i am not even remotely exaggerating. 95% of my graduating class went elsewhere, and the vast majority were working jobs that had nothing to do with our degree.

I was offered a full ride scholarship to go back to school to get a Masters in a specialized area of study (which is the only reason i went); it definitely helped me make good connections and network with people i would never have been able to connect with otherwise. But I had a very particular goal in mind - i had already planned out a career path.
 

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As a younger person, I have to ask if higher education is that important. My parents want me to go and study, but I am not so sure about that. Do I have to spend 4 years or more of my life there to be useful to society? What would you say? I thought that even if I went to a college, I would choose something unconventional like (link removed) because older colleges are too flooded with unnecessary things, subjects, and people. Younger and smaller institutions are less popular and have to be flexible in their offers and strategies. What do you think about that? I am interested in your opinion.
 

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As a younger person, I have to ask if higher education is that important. My parents want me to go and study, but I am not so sure about that. Do I have to spend 4 years or more of my life there to be useful to society? What would you say? I thought that even if I went to a college, I would choose something unconventional like miami.asa.edu because older colleges are too flooded with unnecessary things, subjects, and people. Younger and smaller institutions are less popular and have to be flexible in their offers and strategies. What do you think about that? I am interested in your opinion.
It depends on what you want to do; And if you don't know yet, I would definitely say it is NOT worth the time and money.

I think for disciplines like aerospace engineering, absolutely yes - especially just for the connections you can make to get into a good job after.

I would also advise to get all your "gen ed" courses done at a community college first, then transfer over to focus on the core curriculum for your chosen field - it'll be cheaper and easier in the long run, even if it means taking an extra year or two. BUT make sure to coordinate with someone at the university you want to eventually transfer to to make sure the credits will transfer and fulfill the necessary course requirements for your field of study.

I knew a couple trust fund kids in high school who jumped from major to major, and spent over 10 years in college - one of them eventually dropped out anyways. such a horrible waste.

I also advise that you choose the school based on what you want to do. We have a local community college that is typically looked down upon compared to the local university, but some of their programs actually have better success rates than the university's.

Once you have an idea what you want to do, i would start asking schools to provide information on graduation rates, average time to graduate, average time to find a job in your area of study upon completion, average income of graduates in your field - these statistics are typically provided by schools; if they cannot or will not provide them, you should probably take them off your list for consideration because they probably suck.
 

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The monetization of education through student loans has made it all but worthless today. Like anything else the first people in make out the late comers get hosed.

I earned a psych degree absolutely worthless today, but it was worth $20 an hour when I graduated. The minimum wage was less than $4 at the time. My daughter in law recently graduated with the same degree and makes $15 selling pizzas.

If you're not brilliant and in a cutting edge field you'd be better off aquiring skills and experience.
 

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As a younger person, I have to ask if higher education is that important. My parents want me to go and study, but I am not so sure about that. Do I have to spend 4 years or more of my life there to be useful to society? What would you say? I thought that even if I went to a college, I would choose something unconventional like (link removed) because older colleges are too flooded with unnecessary things, subjects, and people. Younger and smaller institutions are less popular and have to be flexible in their offers and strategies. What do you think about that? I am interested in your opinion.
You joined a prepper community just to post a comment about higher education within which you slipped a link...
As the kids say, "that's sus."
Return to defend your humanity, or be squashed as the spam bot I believe you to be.
 
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