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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here in Mississippi the water pipes are buried approximately 4" deep. Okay. That's an exaggeration but really no deeper than a spade full of dirt. It's not going to get much above freezing today but the main water line is on the west side of the house, which means they won't get any sun until about 4pm. Tonight is supposed to get into the low 20s. Now, I don't really think the pipes will freeze so I'm not going to go full bore prepping for this. But I am going to take some precautions.

One of the little tricks I've learned is to set the dish washer to run with a 6 hour delay-- so set it at 9:30p and it starts at 3:30a which is close to the coldest time. Plus I do "heated wash" which pumps a bit more hot water through the system.

Anyone else have tips/tricks in dealing with a short spell of cold weather?
 

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My secret is to start driving south out of Wisconsin and keep driving until some stranger looks at my bumper sticker and asks, "What's a cheesehead?"

...when Inuit Eskimos start walking to Illinois I look for a flannel shirt...

Edit: I checked the local temperature and I learned that it is 12 degrees. On the Wisconsin scale, that's "balmy with a chance of Chicago tourists…"
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If you have a kitchen or bathroom sink located against an exterior wall, during periods of extreme cold open the cabinet doors under the sink. This allows warm room air in to help prevent pipe freeze ups.
Another thing about Mississippi construction is that a lot of homes are on slabs, very few basements. So naturally pretty much all plumbing is on outside walls. During extreme and long periods of cold in addition to opening the cabinet doors, we put some sort of shop light near the opening.
 

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Rake leaves over the top area where the pipes run and cover with a tarp. This will make a insulated covering and help the natural ground heat to keep the pipes from freezing. Works great in WI in below zero temps.
 

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If you have a kitchen or bathroom sink located against an exterior wall, during periods of extreme cold open the cabinet doors under the sink. This allows warm room air in to help prevent pipe freeze ups.
I do this with my kitchen sink and cabinets, bathroom plumbing has controlled forced warm air behind cabinets and under tub.

System uses a digital temp controller, SSR, RTD sensor and fans, keeps the air under everything at 40 degrees F.
@Marica, my pipes are buried lower than 4 feet more like 5 feet, frost goes down over three on average.
 
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