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Discussion Starter #1
I/ve noticed a few others with a fondness for old surplus rifles. I may be piece mealing together an Enfield Jungle Carbine that will come from a hand picked spare parts inventory from an aquaintance, and it will have zero cosmetic apeal from the get go.

I've tried a few different cold blueing methods but haven't tried Oxy-Blue. Has anyone used both the paste and the liquid? I know there are a ton of YouTube vids on this, but thought some first hand feedback might be useful. The paste "seems" to be the way to go, but I have no idea/experience in the ,atter.

Some may ask why bother but I'm sort of anal retentive about my weapons, even if they are nearly 80 years old and consist of pieces never mated together before, lol.
 

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I've tried them all over the years however not to do large areas. I mostly use cold bluing to repair scratches and such. They all work pretty much the same with the better you prep the surface the better the results. So may take several coats while others cover quicker. None of them really stood out as outstanding to me including Oxy-Blue. At the moment I have the Hoppes Gun Blue Set. Now if you really want it done right I would send it off for either hot bluing or getting one of the several paint systems put on it. To refinish most of the expense is in sending a complete gun to be done but if you send just the parts it can be pretty reasonable.
 

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I'll weigh in and say that it depends on what you're building the rifle for. It won't have much collector appeal since it'll be non matching. If it'll be in it's original military configuration just non matching as opposed to a sporter then have it blued (personally I'd go hot blue since it'll hold up better). If you're building it as a SHTF weapon and going aftermarket stock then I would opt for maybe a cerra-kote finish or similar, maybe even camo paint over a blued finish. Those finishes will be a bit tougher than bluing and will provide the added benefit of a non-glare finish.

-Infidel
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm looking for it to just be a general use sporterized (I hate that term....) Scout version of a Jungle Carbine, with a hell of a lot of pop ::redsnipe:: and a 10 round magazine in a bolt action rifle. There won't be a single matching number to the thing and I'll most likely take a beat up original stock and cut it down, although a Monte Carlo stock does have some appeal for weight purposes.

I had thought about DuraCoat, just hadn't entertained the camo approach. Since it's gonna be an ugly duckling anyway........
 

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I've used Birchwood Caseys a time or two. No issues here.

But it's 70% prep work that makes your job come out right.
Proper Prior Planning Prevents P!$$ Poor Performance.
 

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I've used Birchwood Caseys a time or two. No issues here.

But it's 70% prep work that makes your job come out right.
Proper Prior Planning Prevents P!$$ Poor Performance.
I second that. The BC works well
 

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I'm looking for it to just be a general use sporterized (I hate that term....) Scout version of a Jungle Carbine, with a hell of a lot of pop ::redsnipe:: and a 10 round magazine in a bolt action rifle. There won't be a single matching number to the thing and I'll most likely take a beat up original stock and cut it down, although a Monte Carlo stock does have some appeal for weight purposes.

I had thought about DuraCoat, just hadn't entertained the camo approach. Since it's gonna be an ugly duckling anyway........
If that's the case then it's definitely a candidate for one of the tougher bake on coatings or camo paint. I'd probably go the bake on route personally since it's a bit tougher than paint. These can be done as a DIY project if you're handy.

-Infidel
 

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Cold blue is not as durable as hot blue and is mainly used to hide damage to the finish like scratches and wear spots in the finish. It's not meant to take the place of hot bluing.

Formula 44/40 (original) is the best cold blue I've found to date and it's what I use on my blued guns, it's a thin liquid that blues in an instant to a very dark heavy layer of blue/black. Because it is so dark it is perfect for doing touch ups...
 

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There are plenty of better modern coatings out there.
Just a note when re-bluing some times interesting things can happen. I had an old J Stevens shot gun I did ,it turned Gold in color.
It took a year of research to find out why. It seems some older guns the silica use when the steel was formed/made react with the bluing agents and can turn gold.
It looks cool.
 

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There are plenty of better modern coatings out there.
Just a note when re-bluing some times interesting things can happen. I had an old J Stevens shot gun I did ,it turned Gold in color.
It took a year of research to find out why. It seems some older guns the silica use when the steel was formed/made react with the bluing agents and can turn gold.
It looks cool.
I love it when surprises turn out better than expected!
 

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My .02 cents worth... (that is all I can afford today) I'm hooked on a product called "Gun Kote" from "KG Coatings". It is a Mil-Spec ceramic coating that is nearly indestructible. It comes in a variety of colors and you can mix colors to make your own. I use an air-brush to apply it then bake it in the oven to cure it. Perfect results every time!
The gun blue color looks identical to a factory finish but isn't officially a "blue", just looks like it and a million times tougher. That may not work for you if you are restoring something that needs to remain 100% authentic. Personally I love the stuff.
You can modify the gloss & texture by manipulating the air pressure, distance and temperature of the parts you are finishing. When using the "gun blue" I go for a high gloss finish. Relatively cold metal (doesn't need to be steel either) low air pressure and low volume with several light coats. For a "Parkerized" type finish heat the metal to about 100 degrees then spray at normal volume (as if it were paint) and 12-15 psi. For an even rougher finish crank up the air pressure. Anyway experiment on scrap metal till you get the feel for it.
It wipes off with "MEK" until it's cured in the oven, if you don't like the color, texture or gloss. After it's cured good luck getting it off. I suspect it would need to be blasted.
Once you get the look you want bake it at 325 degrees for 2 hours. With heavy wear it should last several lifetimes.
I've used it on car & motorcycle parts too. Even headers! It's good up to 2200 degrees. Which is around the melting point of steel anyway.
I haven't tried other brands so this is the only one I personally know of that really works.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Jpariz, I have a soft spot in my heart for parkerized finishes. I'll have to look into it, thanks.

Do you bake it in your regular oven? Does it produce a lot of odor?

Oh, and as a guy who makes his living in a lab, please wear good impervious gloves and good ventilation when using MEK. Ketones have a way of finding your liver and kidneys,
 

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Yes, I use a regular oven. And yes, it stinks really bad for the first 10 minutes or so. Keep pets & people away when using. Mother-in-law can watch it bake, ask her to breath deep.

Ohhh one last thing. The color chart is wrong! Also the lighter colors end up about 5-10% darker after curing.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the tip. I'd have to pass on having the MiL breathe deeply though, I'm blessed with a sainted lady for a mother in law, believe it or not! I wish I had half the skills and knowledge she has for identifying, preserving, and storing food. Too bad she's in Conecticut!
 

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Shortly after my MIL died I was trying my best to act sad as I told my friend she was gone. He jumped up and started singing "Ding dong the witch is dead..." I burst out laughing. Like a deer in the headlights I looked over at my wife and she was laughing too. Good thing or I wouldn't be here to tell the story.
 

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This is the one that turned color. It was done about 25 years ago an old J Stevens. The cold bluing turned a bronze gold color
101_5145.JPG
 

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That looks kinda cool. I'd be tempted to leave it alone. Maybe do the barrel in antique brown.
I never did try to correct it is a 12G I used to shoot trap I had been making a point with a few with 2000 dollar trap guns so I started using the old single J Stevens. It was a mess so I did the cold bluing to clean it up a bit.
 
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