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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you overlook the importance of good sturdy clothing for post shtf working and surviving what has come about? Do you have tough, comfortable footwear for lots of walking in rough surroundings and tough, comfortable clothing that will protect from the work and environment while taking the abuse and not wearing out fast. Working in the garden, hunting, foraging and building what needs to be built is tough on yours clothes and footwear. It's one of the things it seems people tend to overlook to me and may find themselves doing hard manual work in a pair of shorts and flip flops. A good pair of jeans, BDU or canvas work pants, work or hiking boots can make a huge difference. Do you have what you need?













:greenboxesonpalette
 

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Good topic. I have enough for myself, but not for my kids. They grow so fast that I can't hardly keep up with their current clothing needs. I would like to at least be ahead in the footwear department for them. This is yet another area of "prepping" that needs more attention.
 

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Yup.

TDUs with rip stop fabric.
8" and 6" side zip insulated and uninsulated lace up boots.
Thermal underwear (good even when it's warm - if you wake up at 3 a.m.)....
Multiple pairs of gloves.
Bandannas.

I prefer Carhart shirts and their duck cloth outerwear clothing.


Good thread Fuzzee!
 

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Working on learning to tan hides without any modern chemicals. We will have sheep and other live stock so it is wise to get this all figured out.
Fair supply of clothing but nothing last forever.
 

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i have carhartt t-shirts ive had for about 4 or 5 years...yes they are worn to shit...one has so many little holes in it ( i donno how the hell they get there ) my one buddy at work thinks it looks like it got hit with a shotgun a couple times...the material the work pants and overalls and all else are made out of is even tougher in my opinion...lol should even stand up to a zombie bite i would think...as for footwear i love my sorel boots for winter...and i ordered a pair of rocky basics temperate military boots that should be there when i get out of camp so im excited to see how they are...getting bigger sizes in advance for the kid is a very good idea...
 

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Visited Costco yesterday and went thru $60 I don't normally spend.

$28 two pair of blue jeans
$20 a hooded flannel heavy shirt
$12 6 pair of wool socks

They are all stacked in a bug out box for the next trip home. I don't need any of them for now, but jeans for $14 kind of beats up the inflation fears we all have. I paid a hell of a lot more for jeans over the years. I also shop at a couple of second hand stores once in a while. I don't care for garage sale clothes but I'm working on a suit case stored of thing I don't plan to wear unless SHTF.
 

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With a kid that grows like a weed this is a challenge, they grow so fast its hard to keep up with there cloths.
That's where yard sales and thrift stores come in handy. Especially if you buy the out of season stuff to save for later. Just have to watch the boutique type stores that specialize only in kids clothing, because their prices can be ridiculous.
 

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I have enough BDUs, ACUs, TRUs, ABC, XYZs, and every other acronym of uniform to open a surplus store, and pretty much all I wear are jeans and T-shirts when I'm not in uniform, so I'm probably good on clothing. Winter clothing may be a little lacking, but that's just because I like having a lot of spares.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have enough BDUs, ACUs, TRUs, ABC, XYZs, and every other acronym of uniform to open a surplus store, and pretty much all I wear are jeans and T-shirts when I'm not in uniform, so I'm probably good on clothing. Winter clothing may be a little lacking, but that's just because I like having a lot of spares.
This is where I'm at too. So many different pairs of BDU's, tactical pants, shirts, and boots that I wear for work and play, but I'm lacking on a bit of the cold weather gear. I have some, but living in the south where it doesn't really get cold is why it's just some. Because I never need it. I'm looking at a major move though to a much colder environment and that needs to change. I'm already planning out and shopping for what I want to have at the ready. The reality is a person needs to not only have clothes but the right ones for the environment too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
....or patch the ones you already have up and stretch them a few more useful miles.
Yep, it's good to know how to sew and patch up tears and rips. A buddy of mine at work and I were talking while working and I mentioned a button had come off my tactical pants he was looking at getting some pairs of and I sewed it back on. He was shocked I could sew, because so many people seem to have no ability for anything but texting on their Iphone. Than he remembered who he was talking to and told me how he learned at an early age growing up in a divorced household like me. Same with cooking, cleaning, repairing household items, gardening, medical and quite a few other skills.
 

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I learned to sew , clean and cook when I was 8 , my Mom had her arm in a sling from tennis elbow even though she didn't play tennis. I learned medical real quick since I was accident prone. The "Up North" family land purchase when I was 10 got me into gardening and the woods.
 

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I kept buying new stuff as I "grew". :wink: I figure in a SHTF situation I'll probably "shrink" a little.

Since the wife sews, (she made a lot of the kids' clothes when they were growing up) the only thing we'll need to add is a treadle sewing machine for non power times. We have one spotted.

Probably have enough material to insulate a small house.

I do need a good pair of boots, though.
 

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Most any sewing machine can be converted to a treadle machine. You won't get some of the facy "programmed" stitches but straight and zigzag will work fine.
 
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