Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The activity in LFI's BYFPC (Back Yard Food Production Complex) has begun in earnest as of today. Since the weather has been incredibly mild the last week or so not that we had much of a winter to begin with, I decided to get somethings started and get the ball rolling at a brisk pace.

I am adding more and more heirlooms each year but I am still using a limited amount of hybrids seeds to exhaust the supply I have on hand and due to the fact there are a couple of things I haven't yet located heirloom wise. I planted the following so far...

2 x Anaheim Chili Peppers
2 x Jalpeno Peppers
2 x Cayenne Peppers
15 x Bell Peppers

I am starting everything from seed this year cause Im a tight wad and the cost of seedlings even when I can find the varieties I want are getting to be pretty pricey. I mean for what one plant would cost I can get dozens of plants from a pack of seeds. Plus if SHTF...Im probably not going to be able to purchase seedlings and will have to rely on my skill at sprouting my own.

I also went by my buddies farm today and cleaned out his barn and areas of his pasture and added about a yards worth of cow manure to the two raised beds I have. I went on a head and tilled it all under along with a copious amount of leaf litter, so in about 3 weeks both beds should be pretty well primed for the first batch of seedlings.

Im looking forward to doing a whole lot more in the coming week or two!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
I tried drying some seeds from a hundred pound sack of green chiles.
They didn't sprout.

I haven't done it in decades.
Any tips for growing them from the pepper?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That would be my move.

I bought one of those little green house thingys at wally world this year. It was about 10 bucks and look like it might be handy for doing small batches of this and that. You can get 15 of the small peat pellets in there comfortably and adjust the air flow in it as well. If going that route use just water until the seeds have sprouted a couple of days then add some fertilizer to the water to help them out. I use a little compost tea myself rather than the chemical stuff thats commonly used. Once they have sprouted, in addition to warmth they will need light in a spectrum that simulates the sun. Since I have aquariums, I sit my little plant trays on top of it and let the warmth from the light keep them doing well. I then use a grow light in a brooder lamp fixture for the light until they get some size on them and I can harden them off a bit before adding to the garden.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yep thats a 10-4 on the peppers and tomatoes. Thats next on the agenda here! Beans, Squash and Melons are usually pretty co-operative and sprout rapidly. No need to soak those. Plant them in a small container and water them and in about 10-14 days you can start hardening them off and putting them outside in the garden once your sure there will be no more freezes.

After the Tomatoes...a gang of Beans, Squash, Okra, Corn and Melons are next up at bat!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Yay! Congrats on getting started, Lunatic! I get excited when I see those tiny sprouts appearing.

We do winter sewing to get a good head start on things. I will be starting my seedlings at the end of this month. Rather than purchasing seed starter soil, I'm going to collect rotted wood, mix it with my aging compost and pot up my seeds. A friend thinks rotted wood is too acidic, but my seeds sprouted last year, til the beloved dog got a hold of them. The seed containers that aren't recycled containers go into a large clear storage container. I have a mini-greenhouse. We have to put plastic over it, then all the potted up stuff will go inside. This will provide a double layer of protection from cold and frost. If you don't know what winter sewing is and you live in the North, I highly recommend finding out. I'll put a link elsewhere on the forum.

Last year I bawled my eyes out, yes, literally, when I discovered my dog got into the containers and ripped my baby seedlings to shreds and damaged the thin seed starter containers. Everything was ruined. I love that dog dearly and he's my baby, but I was SO ready to kick his ass. So I sat and bawled instead of taking my frustration out on him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
Yay! Congrats on getting started, Lunatic! I get excited when I see those tiny sprouts appearing.

We do winter sewing to get a good head start on things. I will be starting my seedlings at the end of this month. Rather than purchasing seed starter soil, I'm going to collect rotted wood, mix it with my aging compost and pot up my seeds. A friend thinks rotted wood is too acidic, but my seeds sprouted last year, til the beloved dog got a hold of them. The seed containers that aren't recycled containers go into a large clear storage container. I have a mini-greenhouse. We have to put plastic over it, then all the potted up stuff will go inside. This will provide a double layer of protection from cold and frost. If you don't know what winter sewing is and you live in the North, I highly recommend finding out. I'll put a link elsewhere on the forum.

Last year I bawled my eyes out, yes, literally, when I discovered my dog got into the containers and ripped my baby seedlings to shreds and damaged the thin seed starter containers. Everything was ruined. I love that dog dearly and he's my baby, but I was SO ready to kick his ass. So I sat and bawled instead of taking my frustration out on him.
You should have beat him with the seedlings. That could not hurt him.
He might have gotten the point not to do it again. But he might get is you were pissed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
We have bought dried beans at the grocery store and they sprout fine, dont waste money on seed when a pound is only a buck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Funny--years ago my grandmother mentioned gathering rotted wood for starting seeds during the depression
Really? Thank you for mentioning that. So it must have worked fine then. I mean, I know the seeds will sprout in it since they did last year, but all of them were ruined, so I didn't get to see the long-term results. I ended up buying seed starter because I had used all the compost I had in that batch of mix.

Some plants do not like acidic soil (which apparently rotted wood is acidic). I didn't get to see if those seedlings would become stressed as we neared planting time. Since I winter sew, the seedlings end up staying in the containers much longer than they otherwise would.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
You should have beat him with the seedlings. That could not hurt him.
He might have gotten the point not to do it again. But he might get is you were pissed.
LOL! I certainly could have. I did give him the "third degree" verbally. There was no mistaking that I was highly pissed, as was indicated by his tail stuck between his legs and his ears laid back. I forgave him.....weeks later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
I would still mix the rotted wood with some potting soil. The wood would be great for holding moisture,I think
I can do that, but I wanted to find out if it would work on it's own. If for some reason I wouldn't have access to seed starter soil, I want to know if I have another option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,608 Posts
Here in Ionia county michigan one does not dare plant a garden prior to May 20th or it will be frost killed for sure. So atarting plants more than six weeks prior to planting out side is foolish, as the plants grow to quich and spindly inside, the first time you put them out they get wind wipped or sun burnt and you loose them. I am really in need of figuring out how to start plants ahead of time and harden them for out door planting with out killing them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
887 Posts
I put a few flower seeds in near me tree bees nest hopefully were 2 weeks from the last frost and I can get an early bloom to help jump start the honey bees. If not Ill just plant a new row in 2 weeks. Got the wood for 2 sawrm traps Im going to set up this year and hopefully increase my nests and odds ::rambo:: of fending off the feds should they decide to show up. HaHa..

Next is potatoes as was mentioned in another thread. I got one golden thats sprouting just put in the window sill. Gonna start slow. Need an Idaho and a Yam then Ill be in potato heaven before long. It does seem theres some heirlooms in the potato dept but as they grow in cold climates I could probably do that project anytime of year. Oregon is mostly mild.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yeah Prepgirl thats a big problem here in a lot of areas. Thats primarily why I went with raised beds as it was easy to fill them with good quality soil than it was to try and amend the existing soil here. I have lost count of the number of pick up truck loads of mulch, leaf litter and Cow Doo Doo I have hauled out to my BOL in a effort to try and create a good sized gardening area just in case on day I have to pick up and go and then depend on it. Man has it taken a lot and been such a monumental task!

Tomorrow morning I am going to get all of the heirloom tomato seeds I have accumulated going. If I can get 15 of them going that should be enough for my little garden and Moms too. Between the two of us, there should be no shortage of tomatoes this season! I am also going to see about getting a good batch of spinach going too. Been eating a lot of steamed veggies of late so I should be able to use all of these before it starts getting too warm here to grow it. That should get me a good jump start while I wait for it to warm up enough to start thinking about the warmer crops like melons, corn okra etc... So much to do and so little time!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Whoot! Whoot!

I finally found a variety of Swish Chard I was looking for all winter long. Not only is it the colorful variety with the brightly colored stems but its supposed to be an heirloom too! I have never ate Swish Chard but I herd its a lot like spinach and supposed to be loaded with vitamins. So I bought a big honking pack of seeds. I first saw this used in landscaping at a "rich and shameless" gated community I worked at during the winter and was struck by just how attractive it looked and liked the fact that it was edible as well. So this afternoon I decided I would plant a tray of 72 of the little buggers and see what the end result is before its gets too hot here to grow it. If all turns out well I will grow a bunch more in the fall. I bet this would make for a excellent plant for those Guerilla Gardening. I mean how many people walking by a vacant wood lot/weed lot in the suburbs would recognize it as a food item?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
I, too, have a raised bed garden. I can't believe how quickly all the dead leaves, wood ash, fruit and veggies scraps and straw goes to nothing! We laid cardboard down as a weedblock, but it's all gone too. So, I know what you mean about all the work involved in building them, though I only have one. We have to start all over again with putting in new layers of stuff to "cook".

Mmmm.... spinach! One of my favorite garden staples! I love it. Right now, I'm wintering over some spinach, arugula and broccoli from last fall. I hope it survives and comes back. That's the cool thing about hearty greens. You can winter them over and have a head start for next spring.

Yes, it gets so busy here with garden stuff in the spring and fall, but I wouldn't have it any other way. Are you canning your stuff this year?

Yeah Prepgirl thats a big problem here in a lot of areas. Thats primarily why I went with raised beds as it was easy to fill them with good quality soil than it was to try and amend the existing soil here. I have lost count of the number of pick up truck loads of mulch, leaf litter and Cow Doo Doo I have hauled out to my BOL in a effort to try and create a good sized gardening area just in case on day I have to pick up and go and then depend on it. Man has it taken a lot and been such a monumental task!

Tomorrow morning I am going to get all of the heirloom tomato seeds I have accumulated going. If I can get 15 of them going that should be enough for my little garden and Moms too. Between the two of us, there should be no shortage of tomatoes this season! I am also going to see about getting a good batch of spinach going too. Been eating a lot of steamed veggies of late so I should be able to use all of these before it starts getting too warm here to grow it. That should get me a good jump start while I wait for it to warm up enough to start thinking about the warmer crops like melons, corn okra etc... So much to do and so little time!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Not canning much of anything yet as I am in the beginning stages of that evolution and moving slowly into it. I do, do a horrendous amount of dehydrating though!

Planted all of my planned Tomatoes this morning. I planted the follwing...

6 x Red Currant (Cherry type Tomato)
3 x San Marizano (Roma Type)
3 x Black Krim (Small-Medium slicing Type)
3 x Brandywine (Medium Slicing Type)

About half these will end up in Moms garden I am planting for her. The Black Krim was awesome last year although not a over big tomato. Great Taste and great Color and good production. The San Marizano was great as well and was responsible for a lot of Pico De Gallo last year which I can eat by the bow full in a sitting! The Barndywine was good too but they got wiped out bt Tomato Blight before I got much from them. The Red Currant is a new one for me this year. The Yellow Pear were good and texture okay but I wanted to try something that might be better so I am trying these out this season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The Black Krims are from Russia originally and brought back by returning WW1 Vets. Its kind of a black Cherry in color. Not a huge tomato but big enough to slice up. This would probably be a variety that would do well in the cooler areas where the season is shorter than it is here down in the south. Another variety that I have done very well with in the past has been the Purple Cherokee. It produces a fruit thats is mottled in colors of purple, orange, red, pale yellow and the fruits arent usually all that symetrical but the taste is to die for! Its probably best grown further south though. The Old Germans are freaking huge! One slice will easily cover the biggest dagwood two fisted sandwich assuring a healthy bite of tomato with each bite of your sandwich! I used panty hose around the fruits for support and tied it to the tomato cages to help support the weight of these tomatoes on steroids.

Yeah I also herd a good freeze can kill it off in the soil but we had a very mild winter this year so it looks like I will just have to put a little more space in between them, keep the folage from making contact with the dirt and water the soil not the plant and see if that helps a bit. Last year was the first year I have had that problem and I will admit my plants were a little on the crowded side too which didnt help Im sure. Just about everyone in this area got hit with it to one degree or another. It was less of an issue for me than it was for most of my neighbors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Thing is that damn blight hangs on in the soil. that's why I move my maters around
Yes, it does. Plus, when there is a break out somewhere, the spores are carried by wind. So even if your plants start out not having blight, they could still become infected. It's so bad here. We've been affected by it for the past three years. It's worse than I've ever seen it.

This will be my first year of not growing any tomatoes. I'm disgusted. I've done everything I could to avoid blight the past three years, but it's all been for nothing. I have four gardens in completely separate areas, distanced from each other. No matter which garden I have grown them in, blight followed. Each year, I have managed only to salvage about half of them by spraying with Neem oil and carefully removing infected tissue weekly. I was careful enough to always cut inches behind the blighted tissue and clean the cutters between plants. It was all to no avail (meaning I could not stop it). I have heard some people have had luck with copper sprays, but I never tried it.
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top