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After reading a book recommended by tirednurse in another thread...I see the wisdom in having a cache of supplies. Even though I plan on bugging in...I would hate to be overran and have nothing
 

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Having a secret second source is a reasonable plan. Maybe even more.
 

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I don't believe in buried caches off my own property - but having 24/7/365 accessible buried caches - that's independent of your buildings is just good sense .... if you lose the buildings to natural disaster, looting, arson or some other unforeseen maledy - you have a hardcore basis of supply to re-start ....
 

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I have been thinking of caches myself and decided on my family's homes, childhood spots and some locations I have keys to as an on call property maintenance contractor. I am working on a PVC tube cache as well to bury for absolute worst case scenario.....But dont quite know yet where to place that one. Prepping is an ever changing and evolving thing........
 

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Items stored at others homes along routes need to get back where you need to be. That is something we sit up.
 

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When planning a cache, it is wise to incorporate all items that shall be needed to operate within the area. In other words, plan as if you have arrived naked and starving. (It just might work out that way.) There are several Military Manuals that make for excellent reading as to how to and what to cache. I'd include a list but Farva (or another keyboard commando) would once again chime in.
 

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After reading a book recommended by tirednurse in another thread...I see the wisdom in having a cache of supplies. Even though I plan on bugging in...I would hate to be overran and have nothing
I will be bugging in myself MM. I have supplies stuffed everywhere I can think of. I have been working on variety buckets. 5 gallon buckets mostly filled with none perishable foods, but also with a knife, fire starters, flashlights, large trash bags (multi use item), water bottles and water filters. I am placing them around the property where they wont be noticed, like in the pig house, chicken house, and garage where they just sit and collect dust like they are nothing special and hopefully would not be noticed. I stashed a few in the drainage culverts bordering the property and secured them in place so they wouldn't wash away. Also plan to bury them around the yard and in the forest land behind me just in case.

If I commuted for my job to an office or specific building I would try to figure out places to bury more along my route.
 

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I have a number of duplicate stashes of high-caloric food bars, ammo, defensive supplies, clothes, bottled water, and whatever else I think may be necessary. I use 8" airtight capped PVC pipe with desiccants to prevent deterioration.

Spread in different potential escape directions out to as much as 25 miles from home base. GPS coordinates locked into my portable...just in case I forget!
 
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A secondary cache is just good common sense.
Your SHTF plan may be to bug in, but what if your SHTF event is personal, and your house burns to the ground?
Having a stash to provide the basics will be huge then.
Some food, water, protection options, cash, and copies of essential documents would make a dramatic difference in your recovery.
 

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but also with a knife

@tirednurse
, as a knife salesman, let me suggest that your new knife should enhance your needs, not something fancy-schmancy to 'wow' your ex-boyfriend.

There is a flat spot right in front of the knife's handle; this flat spot is called a "ricasso." That's a Sicilian word which loosely translate to, "Charge the American twice as much."

More to the point, there is sometimes information stamped on the ricasso. It might tell you where the knife was built, the type of metal used for the blade, and most importantly the date of manufacture. Nowadays new knives come out every few weeks, and the date of manufacture might give you some insight into build quality and Rc hardness.

And learn to sharpen! Believe it or not, it's a pleasure to sharpen in a quiet room as you polish off angstroms of alloy and remind yourself it was your hand that accomplished this.

Ciao, bellissima!
 
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