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Hi everyone, this is my first post on this forum so please bear with me if this has been posted before. My wife and I are relatively new to prepping but are taking it seriously. I've read a few books on the EMP/Solar flare situation and I have a question that I'm hoping someone could help me get some answers to. I work about 40 miles away from my home and in the case of an EMP/Coronal Mass Ejection, I would probably need to walk home. I'm thinking this would take me about a week or less. So, I'm trying to put a bug out bag together that I can keep in my car but I'm not sure exactly what I would need for a 7 day journey. If anyone could help, I would greatly appreciate it...here are some details of the journey:

*I live in a suburb North of Baltimore but work about 10 miles South of Baltimore, so I'd need to make my way through/around Baltimore and head North.
*Winters can be very cold and extend into about March...Summers are very hot and humid, usually in the mid/high 90's
 

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Well for the summers you can put a bike in your car. That way if an EMP does happen you have a bike you can ride. That will cut your time down a lot. You should also start practicing your route. Find a route you want to take to get home, and be safe out there and welcome to the forum.
 

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Hi vintage and welcome to this forom. I don't post a whole lot but I've read a few thousand posts. There are some really knowledgeable people on here so I'm sure you'll get plenty of tips. What you are looking at is really a Get Home Bag and not so much a B.O.B.. A lot will depend on what kind of shape you are in physically. Even you figured to do a modest 8 miles a day you are looking at 5 days, maybe you should consider getting a bike and storing it at work?? If your able, it will easily double your speed getting home. But I digress, to your question. You could add all kinds of little things to your bag that you think you may need but the basics should be.
First and foremost-A PLAN to get home, map it out, pick out some stops and secondary stops. Where you could spend the night, etc.
1. If you intend to walk, have a good pair of hiking shoes and a couple of changes of socks.
2. Water (although this may not be a huge problem in the first day or so) Carry cash and you should be able to acquire some on your way home.
3. Bug spray, defensive weapon of some type, Proper cloths for the season, some food (MRE or Mountain House), way to make fire (3 ways) for boiling and warmth, good flashlight, light weight rain poncho (this could double as your shelter if you get the right type).

There are probably a thousand other things you could add but keep in mind the weight of your pack, if you going to be hiking and your not used to it, its going to hurt after the first day! Lighter the weight the faster you can move, bigger pack could make you a bigger target for the thugs once they figure out law and order are not in play. Hope this helps get you started. You'll get plenty more opinions. Good Luck and glad you are starting to think about it.
 

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Welcome to the group from Arizona.
Land of Sun, Surf, and Sand.
Ok, I lied, no surf, but enough sand
to fill all the dang sand bags I’ll ever need!

Obviously I don't know your state of health or physical condition. A man in good
condition should be able to make about 20 miles per day depending on terrain.
Don't forget a good pair of hiking boots and keep them broken in. If you're in
good health but not physically fit, it's time to get into action and start walking
everyday. Since my back surgery I've started walking twice a day to get back in
shape. I've got a long ways to go, but I'll get there.
As far as your get home bag, don't get carried away. Every pound of equipment
you put in will feel like 10 pounds after packing it for a few miles. So be realistic
about what you need in the pack. Since I don't worry about getting home (retied),
I'll let someone else advise what you need.
 

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a bike sounds like a good idea you can do the forty in a day possibly in couple hours. so I would pack water maybe a box of granola bars or something like that and something for wet weather like a cheap frog tog rain set or/and in the winter some eye wear like goggles or some decent glacier glasses wear the parka to work and of course some warm gloves or mittens+ scarf(very overlooked) and a stocking cap - don't know the laws but a handgun of some sort might be beneficial doesn't have be to fancy or expensive just go bang. keep it all in a small pack or sling bag
maybe some hot hands/hot feet and if your really just want extra to make you feel like you have enough a patrol type sleeping bag such as a snug pack or poncho liner to keep weight down. mayb a estebit stove or gel stove and a candle or two maybe a lighter and some box matches possibly storm type water/wind proof. maybe a tube tent.
basically what everyone else says keep it light after all your going home so take just what you need to get there.
 

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Vintage, welcome to the forum and hello from Michigan. Sheepdog covered a lot of good stuff. like he said you will be sore after your first day of walking so pack some pain relievers to make yourself more comfortable. I recommend an Army issued Woodland poncho, it will do double duty as rain gear and as a shelter. If you use a Camelback then pack water purification tablets otherwise use a canteen and canteen cup or stainless steel bottle so that you can boil water in it, or just use the purification tablets. I would avoid a fire if you can. It will allow others to pinpoint your location by the fire light and smoke signatures.

If you wear dress clothes for your job then you will want to keep a set of comfortable clothes and walking shoes or hiking boots in your vehicle for the walk home. Don't forget extra socks and maybe a small container of foot powder. Maybe a headlamp with a red lens (for night vision) so that you can keep your hands free. For a blanket, maybe a poncho liner so that you can be somewhat warm at night and their lightweight. For food I would recommend those life boat rations like Mainstay or Daytrex. Their high in calories and light weight.

Here is a thread for new preppers, you may get some ideas from it.
http://www.prepperforums.net/forum/general-prepper-survival-talk/14970-where-begin-new-prepper.html

Good luck, I am sure others will chime in with their opinions on what you need. Once again welcome to the forum.
 

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I forgot to mention you may want a small first aid kit for cuts, scrapes and blisters.

You will want something for security, If you do not carry a firearm then you will want something to help protect you like a tactical knife or maybe a spear knife like the Cold Steel Bushman: Cold Steel Bushman Hunter Outdoor Survival SK5 Carbon Blade Knife Sheath 95BUSS | eBay
You could cut a spear handle on the way home and make a spear so that if some one is trying to mess with you, you can keep a distance from them with a spear. Teargas would be useful also. I wouldn't recommend a stun gun because you have to be up close and personal with it.
 

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BOBs and GHBs are a common topic, but everyone has a slightly different situation, so they are always fair game for a new thread. Do look at old threads though as you may find a good idea in an old thread. You don't mention if you have outdoor skills, e.g. camping. It helps if you do.

Given recent experiences in Baltimore, plan your route very carefully. Take a wide route as that place will be a powder keg within hours. Include paper maps in your GHB. Figure the real distance you'll be covering not a "as the crow flies" distance. If you are looking at a week's walk, seriously consider a folding bike you can just toss in the car. Include an air pump and tire repair kit. You do not want to be on the road for a week while the world falls apart. I generally keep a case of bottled water in every car in the household fleet.

Also, make sure you have a set of season appropriate clothing, food, water and water purification capability. The clothing should be sufficient to not only keep you warm, but dry. For shelter, I prefer tube tents in GHBs for the light weight, but others may have different opinions.

I would also not get too hung up on EMPs. EMPs are about the worst situation you can have, but there are other more mundane situations where the GHB will come in handy, e.g. a blizzard that blocks all traffic like the one that hit Atlanta a couple years back. Having the GHB may be the difference between being able to just wait it out in your car vs. being forced to hit the road for lack of food and water or to keep warm, so consider other types of events. The GHB contents may not vary much but your plan of action may be different.
 

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Hi everyone, this is my first post on this forum so please bear with me if this has been posted before. My wife and I are relatively new to prepping but are taking it seriously. I've read a few books on the EMP/Solar flare situation and I have a question that I'm hoping someone could help me get some answers to. I work about 40 miles away from my home and in the case of an EMP/Coronal Mass Ejection, I would probably need to walk home. I'm thinking this would take me about a week or less. So, I'm trying to put a bug out bag together that I can keep in my car but I'm not sure exactly what I would need for a 7 day journey. If anyone could help, I would greatly appreciate it...here are some details of the journey:

*I live in a suburb North of Baltimore but work about 10 miles South of Baltimore, so I'd need to make my way through/around Baltimore and head North.
*Winters can be very cold and extend into about March...Summers are very hot and humid, usually in the mid/high 90's
I rode my bike yesterday, 20 miles in 1:22 minutes. If I slowed down to 10mph which for me is dawdling, I could cover 40 miles in less than 5 hours. your terrain for the most part in Baltimore is flat. 5 days of walking vs 6 hours on the bike? I know what I am doing. You could greatly decrease the amount of "stuff" you need to carry. As long as you have water and a kit to keep the bike running (repair for flats, assess what wrenches or hexes fix the major components, lighting). I would also look into utilizing public transportation to traverse part of the city and take the bike with you.

40 miles or less for me =2 water bottles on the bike and probably no food with me, getting beyond 30 miles I might have a energy bar and/or Gu pack. The total trip by bike makes you independent of the rest of the world for your transportation needs. On foot, unless you do that type of walking regularly, the amount of weight you are speaking of carrying, sleep and rest requirements, food, water and purification........no way in hell I'm walking for 5 days with gear to get home. I think most bags are geared towards 72 hrs. Just make sure the bike fits, you ride enough so that you know the bike fits and you can easily cover ground without breaking much of a sweat or even getting to an aerobic pace, which is about as fast as I ride most of the time. Winter riding is also doable with the correct clothing and gear.

To put it into context, average person walking = 3 mph, lots of wear and tear on the hips back knees and ankles and then add in the weight of your pack. Ouch. Bicycle, 10-12 mph, sitting down, low impact on joints riding/rolling on pavement.
 

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Bicycle's are an easy option to cover large amounts of distance quicker. But the downside is the need or requirement to be able to stick to roads/trails.

To the OP - Check out A. American's first book Going Home in which his main character finds himself (I think) 100's of miles from home. For you its not so much the story side; but what he had in his bag and kit and also his lesson's learned (what he should of brought and what he never used). Might find some good information.

Finally, make sure you build your bag around the area or terrain you plan on travelling through. I live near urban areas surrounded by swamp, light woods, and the Ocean... my bag will be different than yours based on that. If you have readily access to water then I would focus on filter systems more than holding water.. if you have to cross large danger areas (large cities) you may want to include something that would reduce your "signature" (detection and ability to blend in with possible troublesome areas).

EDIT: For all who fear or plan on having to move long distances on foot. Make sure you practice and train for moving long distance with weight. A simple ruck march/hike with a safe weight over a safe distance (such as 6 miles) is a good way to break into it... increase the weight and distance to hit what your target goal is. This will help you figure out HOW far you can travel in a day and how much you can (safely) carry. Also plan for the whatifs... if you can't travel on a hardball road for the easy travel, make sure you know how to navigate through woods/urban areas.... learn to use a compass and carry a map ;)
 

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I'm sorry, I'm hung up on 7 day journey. 40 miles. You could literally do that traveling 3 hours a day for 4 days. Easily.
 

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Bicycle's are an easy option to cover large amounts of distance quicker. But the downside is the need or requirement to be able to stick to roads/trails.

To the OP - Check out A. American's first book Going Home in which his main character finds himself (I think) 100's of miles from home. For you its not so much the story side; but what he had in his bag and kit and also his lesson's learned (what he should of brought and what he never used). Might find some good information.

Finally, make sure you build your bag around the area or terrain you plan on travelling through. I live near urban areas surrounded by swamp, light woods, and the Ocean... my bag will be different than yours based on that. If you have readily access to water then I would focus on filter systems more than holding water.. if you have to cross large danger areas (large cities) you may want to include something that would reduce your "signature" (detection and ability to blend in with possible troublesome areas).

EDIT: For all who fear or plan on having to move long distances on foot. Make sure you practice and train for moving long distance with weight. A simple ruck march/hike with a safe weight over a safe distance (such as 6 miles) is a good way to break into it... increase the weight and distance to hit what your target goal is. This will help you figure out HOW far you can travel in a day and how much you can (safely) carry. Also plan for the whatifs... if you can't travel on a hardball road for the easy travel, make sure you know how to navigate through woods/urban areas.... learn to use a compass and carry a map ;)
He's in Baltimore, that is about all there is there, roads and trails.
 

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Assume 40 as the crow flies and double it to take a safe route around Baltimore. Note also the Harbor tunnel may not be open.
He is a new prepper so I'd rather assume he means 40 miles driving.

Even if you double it 80 miles would take walking 6 hours a day for 4 days. Still easily feasible. That walking 1/4 of the day.

You could literally walk for 1 hour and take a 3 hour break all day for 4 days. You would never get tired, sore for sure, but not tired.
 

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My suggestion is consider leaving work immediately if you recognize an EMP has occurred and take the Baltimore Beltway to circum-navigate the city.
I agree with the immediate action. It will take everyone a while to panic. They will assume that the power will come back on soon, because electric companies deal with this sort of thing all the time, it's just a black out, no need to panic.

Get gone while everyone else is waiting for the government to fix it.
 
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