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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was able to put my own bug out bag together pretty cheap since I already had a lot of the stuff I needed, however, I'm helping my neighbor put one together and she literally has nothing useful. I've done a bit of research and saw ready made ones for $40 $100 and $1000, but even the $1000 one seemed inadequate and pretty heavy. I checked out some blogs too. One called Frugal Dad had a list of 34 items but the total in wieght and cost seemed high (34 Essential Items For Your Bug Out Bag - Frugal Dad), another blog that I read pretty regularly claims to have put one together for $30 (Preparedness Ponderings: Cheap Bug Out Bag). The latter had some good ideas but frankly I don't think this chick is going to be super impressed if I show up with a bag of garbag and a Walmart book bag. So, any suggestions on saving some $$ for a bug out bag? The goal is to spend around $30 to $40 including food and bag.
 

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Whilst I'm familiar first hand at the cheap prices the states has to offer, I would find it impressive if anybody managed to put something useful together at such a small price. Maybe you could prioritise certain items over others depending on what the bug out bag is to cater for.
 

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When I started after Katrina, I took me nearly a year to put together my supplies. Without a good basis to work from (by myself, didn't know others existed) I bought some real good junk. Thank you for trying to help this woman. It is only thru people like you (plural inclusive)and me that we as a nation might survive to rebuild this country. I frequently find things at garage sales and the like. I agree with Mesozoic Survivalist, you need to prioritize the supplies she needs. As she can, buy what she can. If you can, help her out. We can not survive by ourselves. only by grouping together will we survive. In numbers there is safety. Kudos for your assistance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Mesozoic Survivalist, I totally agree with prioritizing. The one blog suggested only worrying about the basics; food, water, shelter and sleep. Also, I didn't mention above but the woman I'm helping is petite so I want to keep the bag light. Light and cheap is kind of a tall order, but I like the garage sale suggestion and I like the idea of repurposing things too.
 

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I got my bug out bag almost completed, not counting consumables it is 34 1/2 pounds. Allot of what I have in that bag can be used by 2 people so her bag wont weigh nearly as much. Mainly sleeping bag, consumables, toiletries, 2 changes of cloths and not much more, provided the 2 of you stay together. Now mind you my B.O.B. is based around living off the land.

I know I could have gotten away lighter but I trust U.S. military surplus equipment for being severely stress tested, I know they weigh more then the civilian version but I know they will hold up. For example the sleeping bag is 9 pounds (no clue what time of year I will have to bug out so preparing for anything).
 

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Mesozoic Survivalist, I totally agree with prioritizing. The one blog suggested only worrying about the basics; food, water, shelter and sleep. Also, I didn't mention above but the woman I'm helping is petite so I want to keep the bag light. Light and cheap is kind of a tall order, but I like the garage sale suggestion and I like the idea of repurposing things too.
I would suggest getting a survival kit in a tin, they're fairly cheap if you search around the web and with a little knowledge to compliment their use you can get a nice little piece of kit to go together with other items. I guess the lightest and cheapest thing to have ready to bug out would be knowledge, it weighs nothing and with the blessing that is the internet, knowledge too is free.
 

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I was able to put my own bug out bag together pretty cheap since I already had a lot of the stuff I needed, however, I'm helping my neighbor put one together and she literally has nothing useful. I've done a bit of research and saw ready made ones for $40 $100 and $1000, but even the $1000 one seemed inadequate and pretty heavy. I checked out some blogs too. One called Frugal Dad had a list of 34 items but the total in wieght and cost seemed high (34 Essential Items For Your Bug Out Bag - Frugal Dad), another blog that I read pretty regularly claims to have put one together for $30 (Preparedness Ponderings: Cheap Bug Out Bag). The latter had some good ideas but frankly I don't think this chick is going to be super impressed if I show up with a bag of garbag and a Walmart book bag. So, any suggestions on saving some $$ for a bug out bag? The goal is to spend around $30 to $40 including food and bag.
I'm having problems taking this question seriously, a person only willing to spend $40 on a bug out bag really doesn't believe in the concept. A decent pair of boots is your budget x 3.

So get her a flashlight and the floor plan for a local sportIng goods store with detailed instructions on where to go and what to loot as she leaves town.

Then add this book or the one for your region:
A Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants: Eastern and central North America (Peterson Field Guides): Lee Allen Peterson, Roger Tory Peterson: 0046442926225: Amazon.com: Books
And this:
U.S. Army Survival Manual: FM 21-76: Department of Defense: 9781481262750: Amazon.com: Books

There, did it for $20
 

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Not everyone can take away from the budget that holds the family together. Others, like you say are not really committed. Not being prepped scares the crap out of me. If nothing ever happens (I pray it never does) I'll probably feel a little foolish about spending the money. But like insurance, you might grouse about the cost of the insurance premiums until the day your house burns to the ground. Surprisingly, people stop complaining at that point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Montana Rancher: In my neighborhood people are most worried about another Sandy style storm/flooding. The goal is to bug out of the low lying areas, not necessarily live off the land for the foreseeable future. I think she's very committed to leaving in an emergency, I just don't think she believes a societal collapse in on the horizon. The exercise here is to make preparation available to the widest range of people. I think the more people who are actively thinking about disaster preparation the better off everyone will be. I think it would have been intimidating to tell someone asking you for help "You're not spending enough money, how can I take you seriously?"
 

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Needless to say i work at a thrift store, minimum wage, yadda yadda. But because of working there, ive scavenged over 500 dollars worth of stuff, for around 50 bucks, getting freebies and then paying like 2 bucks for a 20-40 dollar item.
 

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Montana Rancher: In my neighborhood people are most worried about another Sandy style storm/flooding. The goal is to bug out of the low lying areas, not necessarily live off the land for the foreseeable future. I think she's very committed to leaving in an emergency, I just don't think she believes a societal collapse in on the horizon. The exercise here is to make preparation available to the widest range of people. I think the more people who are actively thinking about disaster preparation the better off everyone will be. I think it would have been intimidating to tell someone asking you for help "You're not spending enough money, how can I take you seriously?"
Hello
Sorry if my last post was a little harsh, I'm am usually very willing to help out but I stand by what I said and my suggestion was probably the best option for a person with only a $40 bug out budget. Your links indicated a true bug out bag not a evacuation bag so it seems like you are changing the subject.

This is a prepper forum so when we say bug out bag we are talking get out of town with no warning from some kind of disaster/unforeseen circumstance. Then either live off the land or get to the bug-in location and equipment will vary depending on the scenerio. If you are talking an evacuation bag that obviously has a completely different set of criteria where taking important papers, cash, pictures, pets, and a vehicle.

So back to the $40, it will take a serious investment in clothing before you should even think about a backpack with anything but water, food, and a fire starter kit. Good quality hiking boots, pants, long underwear, socks, gloves, jacket, rain gear, hat, sleeping system, we are already talking 200+ dollars in my neck of the woods. If you are in a southern location probably less but not much as your weather is often quite severe.

So yes, someone that thought prepping was a good idea as long as it didn't cost more than their next tank of gas, I would say don't waste your money. If they were willing to spend $10 a week to start, then I would say start storing food until you have a 3 day supply, then keep going until it is a 30 day supply. If they get to that point they will start doing some research and be far more likely to take it to the next level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hello
Sorry if my last post was a little harsh, I'm am usually very willing to help out but I stand by what I said and my suggestion was probably the best option for a person with only a $40 bug out budget. Your links indicated a true bug out bag not a evacuation bag so it seems like you are changing the subject.

This is a prepper forum so when we say bug out bag we are talking get out of town with no warning from some kind of disaster/unforeseen circumstance. Then either live off the land or get to the bug-in location and equipment will vary depending on the scenerio. If you are talking an evacuation bag that obviously has a completely different set of criteria where taking important papers, cash, pictures, pets, and a vehicle.

So back to the $40, it will take a serious investment in clothing before you should even think about a backpack with anything but water, food, and a fire starter kit. Good quality hiking boots, pants, long underwear, socks, gloves, jacket, rain gear, hat, sleeping system, we are already talking 200+ dollars in my neck of the woods. If you are in a southern location probably less but not much as your weather is often quite severe.

So yes, someone that thought prepping was a good idea as long as it didn't cost more than their next tank of gas, I would say don't waste your money. If they were willing to spend $10 a week to start, then I would say start storing food until you have a 3 day supply, then keep going until it is a 30 day supply. If they get to that point they will start doing some research and be far more likely to take it to the next level.
I'm sorry, it seems I was confused by a matter of semantics. A bug out bag should be everything you need to survive indefinitely with no contact with civilization, anything less than that is an evacuation bag and spending anything less than hundreds of dollars isn't worth it. I'm obviously not as experienced as you, so I won't argue about the utility of having an evacuation plan in a known flood zone, but I will say that I disagree with your assesment of the usefulness of any level of preparation.
 

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I don't think I can help on a strict $40 budget unless someone is donating things like a bag and a sleep system/sleeping bag. That being said, get creative with your Craigs List searches along with yard sales and thrift shops.

If $40 is all she has at the moment, find anything she has that will carry some gear and get some food and water into it, along with a change of clothes and some personal essentials. From there, add each week. You can be a great resource for her as she plans and sets a budget, and goes shopping for good deals in the used market.

EDIT: Forgot to add to not overlook Flea Markets. Most of them seem to have gone to cheap impoted items that are new, but there are still folks hawking good used items at them, as well as true surplus gear vs the new ballistic nylon tacticool crap.
 
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