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Discussion Starter #1
Hello! I want to set up my bug out bag but there are so many details, I thought I would ask the experts first.

What essential items do you recommend including in a bug out bag to provide for survival (example: an earthquake/natural disaster scenario). I am looking for a comprehensive list that meets these 3 Primary Objectives:

1. Lightest weight possible
2. Costs the least amount of money to fill
3. Meets my survival needs in an urban setting

Than you!

Sue
P.S.
And I haven't purchased the bag itself yet so any recommendations for brand or features are also appreciated.
 

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Water means survival, so a couple bottles of water and a lifestraw are essential IMO..

Then move on to food sources, a couple MRE's for short term, if your anticipating being out for a while then maybe some traps of a sort (Just know how to use them)

Firestarter (Matches are great, but consider a magnesium or the like for wet and repeated use)

I believe a quality fixed blade knife is important also.

Depending on weather you may want gloves.

There are a lot of existing threads as to more in-depth ideas to put in your BOB, may try the search function. You will more than likely get all the answers you need plus some!
 

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First off, the fact that you've not purchased the bag yet is a PLUS!
Far too many people buy a bag, and then their goal becomes filling it.
To hold to your first requirement, avoid this pitfall. The kitchen sink is HEAVY!

Gather the items you consider necessary, arrange them in a functional way, then proceed to find a bag that fits what you have.

All B.O.B.s should cover the three main necessities.
1. Shelter
2. Water (or clean procurement of it)
3. Food (or method of obtaining it)

This follows from the logic that we refer to as "the rule of 3s".
You can survive about 3 minutes without air (not really a problem for most)
You can survive about 3 hours in extreme environments (too cold/too hot) (1. shelter)
You can survive about 3 days without water (not healthy mind you, but still breathing) (2. water)
You can survive about 3 weeks without food (again, miserable, but living) (3. food)

If you have a destination you're bugging out to, shelter would only be what is necessary to get you there safely. (perhaps just one night in a lean-to tarp setup)
If you don't have a place to go, think about methods of crafting a longer-term structure with materials available in the area you are going to be. (skills in bushcraft come in handy here)
A few options for fire building could not hurt. Redundancy is good here. A good lighter, waterproof matches, and if you're handy and know how to use them, a flint and steel striker.

Water is important to life, but water is heavy! To avoid violating requirement #1, carrying your own water should be kept to a minimum.
The better solution would be to carry reusable items that would allow you to collect water from various sources, and filter/decontaminate/purify it on the spot.
This could range from cloth filters and iodine tabs all the way up to hand-pumped Katadyn filters.
You will want to at least pack a container to gather the water into. A metal bottle is great, as it allows for the boiling of your water, which would kill off most baddies.
If time allows, a Camelback insert could be filled before bugging out, but this would add weight, and only be useful if you had a full backpack.

When it comes to food, our species has become masters of cramming high calories into tiny packages. There are tons of options for this.
You will need to plan based on the length of time you expect to be "out".
If a few days, you could sustain on protein bars and trial mix. Lifeboat rations (Mayday, Datrex, etc...) are an easy and long-lasting option too. Just be sure the calories match up to what you need.
If weeks, you should look into methods and skills required to harvest game or wild edibles.

Don't forget to pack something to keep you sane. Books are good, especially ones geared toward survival, as they will encourage you.
The will to live is the strongest survival tool you have. Keep your mind about you, keep a goal, push through.

The primary thing you need in a bug out situation is your skillset.
Learn all you can about taking care of yourself when away from the amenities of home.
This will give you confidence, even in tough times.
 

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Here's a quick list of things you might need,
1. Water (source, purifier, and container)
2. Food (source, processing, cooking)
3. Fire (source and fuel)
4. Cover/shelter (tarp, poncho) (keeping dry)
5. Clothes (different seasons)
6. Communication (hand radio, phone)
7. Tools (multitool for different tasks)
8. Self protection (lethal and non-lethal)
9. Navigation (compass and maps)
10. First aid (small portable kit)
 

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Get a tub. Like a rubber maid tub. Anywhere between 5 and 8 gallons is fine. This is now your bug out bag. You can put only the MOST essential items in it. When you have them ALL - then you get to buy a bag (with hydration system) that will hold all of that stuff.

Remember...
1. Stuff first
2. Bag second

This is for two reasons. If you get a big bag like Kauboy pointed out, you will keep filling and filling and filling it until it has a bunch of useless dead weight. And two - an empty bag is useless. Spend your money on goods first and you will have something when the SHTF - if you only have the tub or a box then you can still shove that in the car in less than 5 minutes.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
First off, the fact that you've not purchased the bag yet is a PLUS!
Far too many people buy a bag, and then their goal becomes filling it.
To hold to your first requirement, avoid this pitfall. The kitchen sink is HEAVY!

Gather the items you consider necessary, arrange them in a functional way, then proceed to find a bag that fits what you have.

All B.O.B.s should cover the three main necessities.
1. Shelter
2. Water (or clean procurement of it)
3. Food (or method of obtaining it)

This follows from the logic that we refer to as "the rule of 3s".
You can survive about 3 minutes without air (not really a problem for most)
You can survive about 3 hours in extreme environments (too cold/too hot) (1. shelter)
You can survive about 3 days without water (not healthy mind you, but still breathing) (2. water)
You can survive about 3 weeks without food (again, miserable, but living) (3. food)

If you have a destination you're bugging out to, shelter would only be what is necessary to get you there safely. (perhaps just one night in a lean-to tarp setup)
If you don't have a place to go, think about methods of crafting a longer-term structure with materials available in the area you are going to be. (skills in bushcraft come in handy here)
A few options for fire building could not hurt. Redundancy is good here. A good lighter, waterproof matches, and if you're handy and know how to use them, a flint and steel striker.

Water is important to life, but water is heavy! To avoid violating requirement #1, carrying your own water should be kept to a minimum.
The better solution would be to carry reusable items that would allow you to collect water from various sources, and filter/decontaminate/purify it on the spot.
This could range from cloth filters and iodine tabs all the way up to hand-pumped Katadyn filters.
You will want to at least pack a container to gather the water into. A metal bottle is great, as it allows for the boiling of your water, which would kill off most baddies.
If time allows, a Camelback insert could be filled before bugging out, but this would add weight, and only be useful if you had a full backpack.

When it comes to food, our species has become masters of cramming high calories into tiny packages. There are tons of options for this.
You will need to plan based on the length of time you expect to be "out".
If a few days, you could sustain on protein bars and trial mix. Lifeboat rations (Mayday, Datrex, etc...) are an easy and long-lasting option too. Just be sure the calories match up to what you need.
If weeks, you should look into methods and skills required to harvest game or wild edibles.

Don't forget to pack something to keep you sane. Books are good, especially ones geared toward survival, as they will encourage you.
The will to live is the strongest survival tool you have. Keep your mind about you, keep a goal, push through.

The primary thing you need in a bug out situation is your skillset.
Learn all you can about taking care of yourself when away from the amenities of home.
This will give you confidence, even in tough times.
::clapping::Wow! I can't thank you enough for this awesome post!::clapping::
 

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BOBs fit a need, I personally don't see the point, unless its point a to b travel, or a ghb, as you really think you will return home after you leave it due to danger/supply shortage

the first important items
water
food
shelter
defense

then a very small first aid kit with bandages but generically Bob's are 3 day packs, so you don't need a hospital worth of equipment

inch bags are a different kettle of fish... but more a complex bob, the foundation is the same tho... so includes a lot of extras

good luck

with pack choices, I strongly suggest civilian packs, and if your building more than one (family) each pack is different, uniform = organization
 

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Great post Kauboy, The only thing i would add too his post is, IMO the more skills you know, the less equipment your going to need to carry..
 

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There is a list under prepper tools in this forum ie; http://www.prepperlog.com/Full-Size-Bug-Out-Bag-Checklist.pdf . Just remember weight is everything. at 25 miles (1) one ounce is a killer. So, weight it , change some things and weight it again. you can always cashe things to heavy or extras. ammo is heavy but you need it so cashe extra ammo. Try to make weapons the same calibers, rifles and pistols, 5.56mm for rifles and 9mm for pistols or what ever. less ammo to carry individually, you can share similar ammo's.

MOLON LABE
 
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