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hi all,

how are effective are Brita filters? are these a good thing to stock up on for prepping solution?
 

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We have used a Brita filter pitcher for many years. Our water comes from a deep well and has iron and minerals. We have a 400 gallon aireator system to remove some of the taste, and use the Brita as a final step on the water we drink.
It works for the intended purpose - filtering particulates.
 

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I was advised to try it because I had kidney stone problems the doctors found were iron based and it was believed to be a water problem where I live. I would not imagine it a "SHTF" or "survival" filtration system but more a life around the house one.
 

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Ok guys I did search the net and most people say it does not really clean the water from containments just lime scale and chlorine taste, so it seems it might be a lot of money to spend when I would get other items and just get a load of water purification tablets.
 

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It depends what you need to do with your water. I am on a well. My well is in a state with a lot of agriculture. You could drink that water and not have a clue what you are drinking. When we bought the place, a water test was done, and the nitrate level was two and a half times the upper safe level. That water would kill a baby under 6 months of age if boiled and made any more concentrated. As you BOIL water, whatever is in it gets more concentrated. What you want when you boil water is to collect the steam, which is FREE of those contaminants. You want to distill water. If you are on the run, it's a bit tough to carry around a 'still'. If you are stationary, it's not hard to set up a distiller using a pressure canner.

Nitrate levels alone are an indicator of other chemicals and often microbes in your water. If you plan on taking water from a fresh water source and hope to run it thru some kind of purifier, you will have to settle for some chemicals in your water, and the fact that this process takes a long time.

Collecting rainwater off a steel roof into a barrel may be your safer option, then run that thru some of the better filters. That will work OK, unless we have infested birds that could cause us to fall ill. Even then, chlorinating it or putting iodine in it, may mitigate the risk.

I live in an area rich in water resources. No one would EVER think my region has a 'water' issue, until they try to drink it, untreated.

Also, keep in mind even municipal water, doesn't have to test for most contaminants, only a few. Many on city water having been drinking Hexavalent Chromium for decades without knowing. (Erin Brokovich fame) We have arsenic, radon, pesticides and herbicides in our water around this region. Which is why most of us have RO systems. Those systems go off when the electricity goes off. Short of getting a generator and hoping to find gas, we won't have those systems. Often people get coliform bacteria too. I don't want to rag on and on about water quality, I will just say, it isn't easy to get pure water any more.

I have a well. I have 2 large pressure canners. I bought an Amish bucket (I would have bought a Bison pump if I could afford it). I bought a Vortex coil system for distillation. I live between 2 major rivers, less than 1200 meters from one, but I wouldn't drink that water unless I was dying anyway. I am up North in the land of fresh water. I live near a spring fed fresh water lake, and I would not drink that either, altho it is cleaner than the river. That would be my backup. I would still distill that water. I also live near some Springs, those could possibly be cleaner. But so far, my well, appears to have the safest water at this point. I probably won't die from drinking what is in there because I am older. I would not want a kid growing up on that water. I have been on some type of rural residential well now for 30 years of my life and until 2006, it was untreated water with a nitrate level below 10mg/L. Now that factory farming has taken off, no rural well should be considered safe in the US. I doubt Europe is any better.

In a survival situation, we won't be drinking crystal clear water. We will all have to make do.
 

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hi all,

how are effective are Brita filters? are these a good thing to stock up on for prepping solution?
These (Pur) are supposed to be pretty good. Neighbor uses one, says it 10 times better than Brita
7 Cup Water Filter Pitcher | PUR
They've got smaller, and one that tells you to change the filter. Cost was about $21.00 and filters go $11- $12 each and gives you 40 gallons.
 

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IngaLisa, you've certainly made me reconsider my long term water resource plan!! We've got bottled water for short term, with filtration systems for longer term water. We've got a river very near our home in the city, and a 55,000 acre lake at our cabin (bug-out) location. Always considered the filtration systems to be adequate. Dang! Now we've got to plan on a distilation system!! Thanks a bunch!! LOL!!:grin:
 

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Does anyone know a good site that has instructions on making a water distillation system from house hold items?
 

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Get a simple nitrate test. Often your state lab can direct you to where to get a kit. The nitrate level could be low, and if it is, it is far less likely that you will have other issues. Nitrate testing is cheap. Often the county public health department will do the test or direct you to where you get a kit. Try that first.

As far as making a home distiller, there is a youtube some one posted on here. That is how I got the idea. We just bought the Vortex, because it was done and saved us the step of setting up the coil, but a handy person can do this very easily. Look at youtube, I bet you can find a video on how to make a home unit to distill water.

Oh, we also got a Grover rocket stove, because we needed a stable heat source for the pressure canner. Pressure canners are tough to use without a stove. From the research I saw, a Grover rocket stove worked well for that application. I haven't tried this set up yet, but when I will, I will let you know how it goes.
 

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The best still in the world is a "reflux still". You can adjust the temperature for what ever you want. I have one for making alcohol and it is just a matter of adjusting the temp to convert it for water. It will give you the highest yield per gallon input of any still and they are easy to make and easy to clean - something that is absolutely necessary to good drinking water.
 
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