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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey I just had what I 'think' is a bright idea for storing blades and other metal tools.

Candle wax is a fairly easy to find and cheap resource that melts on a fairly low heat and is not water soluble so I was thinking, for storing metal blades and tools for a long time why not melt up some candle wax and put a thin coating over the tools to protect them from moisture.

Now I have tried this on the blade of a small folding knife I have and I have found that when the wax has cooled fully, to clean the wax from the blade only took a cheap stiff edged plastic windscreen frost scraper.

I plan within the next month to buy a cheap knife that will rust fairly quick left to its own devices, coat it and leave it somewhere moderately exposed to the elements here at home as a long term ongoing test.


With this in mind I was wondering if any of you had used this idea and what sort of results you had?
 

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This just may be me being a little silly but why not just spend a little bit more on a knife that is not going to rust. Stanless steel is pretty cheap. I think that would be a better solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I dont like using stainless for anything critical, from past experience its just too hard to keep a good edge on a blade and too brittle. So I tend to buy carbon steel implements, tools and blades.
 

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Stainless steel blades have come a long way in the last ten years or so. Stainless Pakistan is a thing of the past.
 

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I dont like using stainless for anything critical, from past experience its just too hard to keep a good edge on a blade and too brittle. So I tend to buy carbon steel implements, tools and blades.
My Old timer I have had for over 20 years and it's been through hell and back and not a spec of rust on it at all. Still holds a great edge. but if that's what you need to do to feel safe about it great to hear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well after having a stainless hatchet shatter am DONE with stainless for any load bearing use as I am sure you can understand.
 

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A can of Birchwood Casey Sheath Rust Preventative would work but I have no idea how long it would last. At $7 a can it might be a better alternative.

-Infidel
 

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Yep, you sure could but it won't last as long as a product that's actually designed for long term storage and you'll have to re-apply it. This is why cosmoline was created, it keeps moisture from reaching the steel and lasts darn near forever. I wouldn't recommend cosmoline for a knife although you could use it but I've been known to cut up my dinner with my pocket knife if I'm camping so I wouldn't use cosmoline on it.

-Infidel
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Part of the reason I was suggesting this is that the wax will form a solid barrier around the metal to protect it that will not drip, run, creep or evaporate off leaving the metal exposed and can be left in place for YEARS if needs be.

Yet at the same time if you do need to clean off the implement its easy to do with a firm bit of wood or as I suggested a stiff plastic windscreen frost scraper AND you can collect the wax as you remove it and use it to make candles.
 

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I see no harm at trying it and I'd love to see your results. Wax is cheap and I'm sure many of us already have candles in our houses. It would be a renewable resource and I don't see how it could hurt. My only concern is using it on a folding knife. The walls of the handle may remove some of the wax, it might work better on fixed blades.
Also, they coat cheese in wax and it keeps lol why not a knife!?
Tell us what comes of your experiment.

-Frank
 

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A couple of things. First of all, it seems to me an even easier way for long term storage would be a thin coat of white grease or gun grease. Why complicate things?

Secondly, on the "carbon vs. stainless" debate. It all depends on WHICH steels you are comparing. There are dozens of steels out there, all with different characteristics and properties, such as hardness, toughness (yes, there is a difference), rust resistance, ease of sharpening vs. edge holding ability, etc.. The terms "carbon steel" or "stainless steel" by themselves are so vague as to be meaningless. This is a very good read on a comparison of knife steels:
Knife Steel FAQ

My personal favorite steels are 52-100 (carbon); D2 (carbon, but very, very close to being stainless); A2 (carbon); ATS 34 (stainless); and 154 CM (stainless) -- although there is a lot to be said for the tried and true 1095 (carbon) and 440C (staineless, and not to be confused with 440A or 440B). Heat treating also makes a big difference.

I NEVER buy a knife unless I know what kind of steel the blade is made of.
 

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I was thinking about this in the context of caching tools and such. No question cosmoline would be a superior anti corosion agent above all others. Put enough cosmoline on something and you can bury it with a sheet wrapped around it and not worry.

Just make sure there is ZERO rust on it before you apply the cosmoline or it will disintegrated under the coating.
 

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Nuttin wrong with a little WD40 and parchment paper or wax paper. Sometimes low tech works great.

NASA spent 2 million dollars and 10 years to design a pen that would write in zero gravity for the space program.
The Soviets sent a pencil.
 

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Nuttin wrong with a little WD40 and parchment paper or wax paper. Sometimes low tech works great.

NASA spent 2 million dollars and 10 years to design a pen that would write in zero gravity for the space program.
The Soviets sent a pencil.
love it.
 
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