Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
I took my compound bow to a local archery 'Pro' shop last week and asked the tech if he could tweak it to help me get more consistent shots. We spent about half an hour playing with the draw length, rest alignment and cam stops... shooting a few arrows after each adjustment. The tech also encouraged me to install a wrist strap ($12.00) allowing me to completely relax my bow grip. The result was fantastic. I now have some arrows sharing the same hole in the target at 20 yards... even with cheap Wal-mart 400 spine carbon arrows ($3.25 ea).

My point is, if you're trying to get your bow shooting to a point where you can consistently take large and small game (now or in a SHTF situation), practice is extremely important, but getting professional input and having a bow that's been tuned to you is a step that should not be under estimated or ignored. I feel confident that, if there's game to be had, I can put it on the table with this bow. Now my recurve is next in line for a little professional tuneup.
Excellent advise. Even though I am a Expert Marksman and former training a various weaponry when on active duty in the USMC I am now also adding archery to my skills. I believe that this form of weaponry will be a valuable skill and one I am teaching my children as well. As with all things the trick is to learn from the pros. I hope that you learned a lot from the 1 1/2 hour experience with the Bow Tech. Did you write down any notes that you would like to share for the benefit of the forum members?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
I'm not an expert by any means, but I've been bowhunting since my youth. I prefer firearms, but like the challenge of the bow, and it's a great way to extend your hunting season. Here's a few tips that could be useful to anyone, but are geared more toward the beginner:

1. Bows are a lot like pistols, in that personal preference makes a huge difference in selection. If at all possible, shoot several at a pro shop before settling on a brand or model.
2. It's not a he-man contest, so you don't need an 80# draw weight to hunt. I prefer 60# for midwest whitetail hunting (where my shots average 15-25 yards), and 70# for southwest hunting where the land is more open, and longer shots are usually necessary.
3. You don't need the latest and greatest, but technology certainly does have its benefits. MANY deer were taking with longbows, recurves, etc., so yes, they'll still work. However, a modern/efficient bow may have a lot of little perks that will benefit you (higher KE with lower draw weight, higher let-off %, speed, forgiveness, etc)
4. When practicing, make sure you use good form (have a pro show you; not a buddy). 5 perfectly-placed target shots are more valuable than 20 sloppy ones. You're going to use muscles that likely haven't been used before, so you're going to get tired quickly. QUIT PRACTICING when you get tired. If not, you'll only develop bad habits.
5. Don't get caught up in the "speed trap" with bows. Many people judge a bow's value and effectiveness by how fast it shoots. Sure, it'll allow you to make longer / quicker shots since it will shoot a bit flatter, but if you're not comfortable with the bow or have good form, you'll only miss quicker.
6. Even though there's not much to clean on a bow (other than wiping the dust off it), maintenance is still important. Make a habit of thoroughly inspecting the string & cables every time you shoot. Rub them down often with bowstring wax. If it's starting to fray, get it replaced. Lots of people recommend replacing strings every year regardless of how much it's used. Personally, I replace mine about every three years (don't forget that new strings stretch with use, and will require a break-in period).
7. Practice from multiple positions (sitting, kneeling, standing and elevated). If shooting from a raised platform (treestand), make sure and bend at the waist instead of just lowering your bow arm.
8. Just like firearms training, occasionally practice while wearing all the gear you'll likely be wearing while using the bow. You don't want to find out at the wrong moment that you're hunting jacket is so bulky that it makes contact with your string when shooting.
9. Practice at unknown distances; not just 10, 15, 20, 30, etc. This will make you better at range estimation (which is much more critical with stick and string). I like using a target that I can throw & roll around on the ground to get unknown distances.
10. Have fun!

And if there's nowhere to put a treestand on your property (if you're like me and live in the city), shoot from the rooftops if your neighbors won't freak out...:-D I even have my spotter calling my shots for me:
Very informative post Thanks for sharing! Copied and pasted your post for my own references.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top