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I took my compound bow to a local archery 'Pro' shop last week and asked the tech if he could tweak it to help me get more consistent shots. We spent about half an hour playing with the draw length, rest alignment and cam stops... shooting a few arrows after each adjustment. The tech also encouraged me to install a wrist strap ($12.00) allowing me to completely relax my bow grip. The result was fantastic. I now have some arrows sharing the same hole in the target at 20 yards... even with cheap Wal-mart 400 spine carbon arrows ($3.25 ea).


My point is, if you're trying to get your bow shooting to a point where you can consistently take large and small game (now or in a SHTF situation), practice is extremely important, but getting professional input and having a bow that’s been tuned to you is a step that should not be under estimated or ignored. I feel confident that, if there’s game to be had, I can put it on the table with this bow. Now my recurve is next in line for a little professional tuneup.
 

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I do my own tune-ups. My wrist strap is a piece of camo rope. It doesn't take much, just that you know your bow won't fall when you hold your hand open.

Now, I have to go up in the attic for the bow, arrows and target. I just bought 6 Fred Bear broadheads NIPackage for $2, and they needs arrows.
 

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That's awesome! I'm all about Guns, But i have to say, a Bow in a LOT of situations would be better! My oldest has been begging for one. we tld her when we can afford one she'll get it! (she's 12)
Any great post!
 

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That's awesome! I'm all about Guns, But i have to say, a Bow in a LOT of situations would be better! My oldest has been begging for one. we tld her when we can afford one she'll get it! (she's 12)
Any great post!
There are a lot of used bows out there now. A lot of folks are switching to Crossbows, so a used bow will be cheaper than they used to be.
 

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I have found that a little help from a compitent Pro Shop, has always been well worth the money expended many times over! 99% of the time they aint doing anything you cant do. The difference is...they do it for a living, most are archers too and they mess around with Bows enough they can usually identify exactly where the problem lies and exactly what it takes to correct it and do it for the least amount of funds/time expended. That results in you getting to enjoy your bow and shooting and less time flusterated trying to get the most out of it.
 

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That's how I learned, I paid the tech enough times to figure it out. I just shoot when and however long I want to now. I know more that most of the techs at the big box stores.

Butt some of the AHoles just are about making $$$$ and will screw you over anyway they can. Find one you can trust and you'll be golden, maybe bring some java and coffee cake for a bribe.
 

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I bought my 1st Compound Bow a few years ago. after searching online only to get more and more confused I took a road trip to Sportman's Warehouse. . Within I would say I had a great package going and the Tech wasn't trying to upgrade me to the top of the line stuff but more so pointed out useful items within the mid to upper range level.

He sent time showing me how to use the trigger, where to pull too, set to pull length, cut a couple dozen arrows, tipped them, install a pin sight and adjusted it as I took a few shots...with 5 shots some adjustments I was hitting a 2 inch dot at 15 yards.

GF shipped her bow she bought at bass Pro here from NC where a friend had taken it apart, lost a few bits and needed a new string. I order her a string and took the bow up to be checked out. Tom replaced the string, figure the pull length and arrows were way long, replaced the missing parts, cut her a dozen arrows and tipped them for the cost of the parts....No Labor charges. He then spent another hour breaking her of the bad technique the sale person at Bass Pro had taught her. Adjusted her sights and she was hitting the target every time.

I have run across a person here and there that own a small shop and where ticked that they didn't get my money, my technique is all wrong, pull is out of whack and what not....I let him shoot and then I let loose a couple arrows and walk away shaking my head.

In short, go find a reputable shop with techs that are there to help and not just sale you stuff.....Buy once and Cry once but in the long run you will be far happier with your purchase and you aren't fighting it....If the bow it set up right then you can work on Your Skills and not be continually trying to fix/adapt your technique to shot a bow that is set up all wrong to start with.

Karsten
 

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That's how I learned, I paid the tech enough times to figure it out. I just shoot when and however long I want to now. I know more that most of the techs at the big box stores.

Butt some of the AHoles just are about making $$$$ and will screw you over anyway they can. Find one you can trust and you'll be golden, maybe bring some java and coffee cake for a bribe.
Well said AquaHull. You know your in the wrong place when as a beginner you have already ran up a 1000.00 dollar bill, have a naked bow and havent added sites, rest, arrows or tunning to the bill yet!

In short, go find a reputable shop with techs that are there to help and not just sale you stuff.....Buy once and Cry once but in the long run you will be far happier with your purchase and you aren't fighting it....If the bow it set up right then you can work on Your Skills and not be continually trying to fix/adapt your technique to shot a bow that is set up all wrong to start with.
Sound advice indeed Karsten. I couldnt agree more!
 

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I took my compound bow to a local archery 'Pro' shop last week and asked the tech if he could tweak it to help me get more consistent shots. We spent about half an hour playing with the draw length, rest alignment and cam stops... shooting a few arrows after each adjustment. The tech also encouraged me to install a wrist strap ($12.00) allowing me to completely relax my bow grip. The result was fantastic. I now have some arrows sharing the same hole in the target at 20 yards... even with cheap Wal-mart 400 spine carbon arrows ($3.25 ea).

My point is, if you're trying to get your bow shooting to a point where you can consistently take large and small game (now or in a SHTF situation), practice is extremely important, but getting professional input and having a bow that's been tuned to you is a step that should not be under estimated or ignored. I feel confident that, if there's game to be had, I can put it on the table with this bow. Now my recurve is next in line for a little professional tuneup.
Excellent advise. Even though I am a Expert Marksman and former training a various weaponry when on active duty in the USMC I am now also adding archery to my skills. I believe that this form of weaponry will be a valuable skill and one I am teaching my children as well. As with all things the trick is to learn from the pros. I hope that you learned a lot from the 1 1/2 hour experience with the Bow Tech. Did you write down any notes that you would like to share for the benefit of the forum members?
 

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I'm not an expert by any means, but I've been bowhunting since my youth. I prefer firearms, but like the challenge of the bow, and it's a great way to extend your hunting season. Here's a few tips that could be useful to anyone, but are geared more toward the beginner:

1. Bows are a lot like pistols, in that personal preference makes a huge difference in selection. If at all possible, shoot several at a pro shop before settling on a brand or model.
2. It's not a he-man contest, so you don't need an 80# draw weight to hunt. I prefer 60# for midwest whitetail hunting (where my shots average 15-25 yards), and 70# for southwest hunting where the land is more open, and longer shots are usually necessary.
3. You don't need the latest and greatest, but technology certainly does have its benefits. MANY deer were taking with longbows, recurves, etc., so yes, they'll still work. However, a modern/efficient bow may have a lot of little perks that will benefit you (higher KE with lower draw weight, higher let-off %, speed, forgiveness, etc)
4. When practicing, make sure you use good form (have a pro show you; not a buddy). 5 perfectly-placed target shots are more valuable than 20 sloppy ones. You're going to use muscles that likely haven't been used before, so you're going to get tired quickly. QUIT PRACTICING when you get tired. If not, you'll only develop bad habits.
5. Don't get caught up in the "speed trap" with bows. Many people judge a bow's value and effectiveness by how fast it shoots. Sure, it'll allow you to make longer / quicker shots since it will shoot a bit flatter, but if you're not comfortable with the bow or have good form, you'll only miss quicker.
6. Even though there's not much to clean on a bow (other than wiping the dust off it), maintenance is still important. Make a habit of thoroughly inspecting the string & cables every time you shoot. Rub them down often with bowstring wax. If it's starting to fray, get it replaced. Lots of people recommend replacing strings every year regardless of how much it's used. Personally, I replace mine about every three years (don't forget that new strings stretch with use, and will require a break-in period).
7. Practice from multiple positions (sitting, kneeling, standing and elevated). If shooting from a raised platform (treestand), make sure and bend at the waist instead of just lowering your bow arm.
8. Just like firearms training, occasionally practice while wearing all the gear you'll likely be wearing while using the bow. You don't want to find out at the wrong moment that you're hunting jacket is so bulky that it makes contact with your string when shooting.
9. Practice at unknown distances; not just 10, 15, 20, 30, etc. This will make you better at range estimation (which is much more critical with stick and string). I like using a target that I can throw & roll around on the ground to get unknown distances.
10. Have fun!

And if there's nowhere to put a treestand on your property (if you're like me and live in the city), shoot from the rooftops if your neighbors won't freak out...:-D I even have my spotter calling my shots for me:
 

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Great post countdown! There is a lot of gold nuggets of useful info there and sound advice. I can certainly relate to No. 4 especially. When I first started shooting, after a couple of days I had to lay off for about a week due to severe pain in my shoulder. After about a week I dialed it down to 60 pounds and shot for about 3 weeks then cranked it back up to 70 and never had a issue again. I should have suspected such but hey, you live and you learn.
 

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I'm not an expert by any means, but I've been bowhunting since my youth. I prefer firearms, but like the challenge of the bow, and it's a great way to extend your hunting season. Here's a few tips that could be useful to anyone, but are geared more toward the beginner:

1. Bows are a lot like pistols, in that personal preference makes a huge difference in selection. If at all possible, shoot several at a pro shop before settling on a brand or model.
2. It's not a he-man contest, so you don't need an 80# draw weight to hunt. I prefer 60# for midwest whitetail hunting (where my shots average 15-25 yards), and 70# for southwest hunting where the land is more open, and longer shots are usually necessary.
3. You don't need the latest and greatest, but technology certainly does have its benefits. MANY deer were taking with longbows, recurves, etc., so yes, they'll still work. However, a modern/efficient bow may have a lot of little perks that will benefit you (higher KE with lower draw weight, higher let-off %, speed, forgiveness, etc)
4. When practicing, make sure you use good form (have a pro show you; not a buddy). 5 perfectly-placed target shots are more valuable than 20 sloppy ones. You're going to use muscles that likely haven't been used before, so you're going to get tired quickly. QUIT PRACTICING when you get tired. If not, you'll only develop bad habits.
5. Don't get caught up in the "speed trap" with bows. Many people judge a bow's value and effectiveness by how fast it shoots. Sure, it'll allow you to make longer / quicker shots since it will shoot a bit flatter, but if you're not comfortable with the bow or have good form, you'll only miss quicker.
6. Even though there's not much to clean on a bow (other than wiping the dust off it), maintenance is still important. Make a habit of thoroughly inspecting the string & cables every time you shoot. Rub them down often with bowstring wax. If it's starting to fray, get it replaced. Lots of people recommend replacing strings every year regardless of how much it's used. Personally, I replace mine about every three years (don't forget that new strings stretch with use, and will require a break-in period).
7. Practice from multiple positions (sitting, kneeling, standing and elevated). If shooting from a raised platform (treestand), make sure and bend at the waist instead of just lowering your bow arm.
8. Just like firearms training, occasionally practice while wearing all the gear you'll likely be wearing while using the bow. You don't want to find out at the wrong moment that you're hunting jacket is so bulky that it makes contact with your string when shooting.
9. Practice at unknown distances; not just 10, 15, 20, 30, etc. This will make you better at range estimation (which is much more critical with stick and string). I like using a target that I can throw & roll around on the ground to get unknown distances.
10. Have fun!

And if there's nowhere to put a treestand on your property (if you're like me and live in the city), shoot from the rooftops if your neighbors won't freak out...:-D I even have my spotter calling my shots for me:
Very informative post Thanks for sharing! Copied and pasted your post for my own references.
 
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