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It seems that most beginning Preppers start with a BOB, or it's one of the very early goals. I agree it's an important, even essential, milestone to aquire. Over time I have evolved my thinking about the 72 hr aspect of the BOB, and have come to the conclusion that it's just not gonna cut it for us.

I have come to embrace the I'm Never Coming Home philosphy with regards to my BOB. It's not so different than a 72 hr approach except for thinking more along the lines of sustainability over a period of time. I have also come to realize that this isn't so easily accomplished with one single load out, and is better suited to a small group that is able to distribute the load out and allow for redundancy.

My hypothetical question is, geiven 3 or 4 strong and able backs to carry the "I'm Never Coming Home" load out, what would you outfit them with?
 

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My hypothetical question is, geiven 3 or 4 strong and able backs to carry the "I'm Never Coming Home" load out, what would you outfit them with?
A set of ear plugs and fifty bucks. That way they don't have to listen to my wife's bitching on the way out and have money for lunch when they're done. Oh...wait. You meant...sorry, my bad. Wrong thread. :roll:
 

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Not much different than my bob, but I like to advise against INCH bags.

Why? 'Cause I'm biased against them, most people who have INCH bags think they are going to go into the woods and survive on the land. Ain't. Going. To. Happen. I actually advise against INCH concepts to most people. Best example is I recommend strike anywhere matches over a firesteel. Everyone puts a firesteel in their pouch because it can start thousands of fires - which you need in a INCH bag. In in a BOB you don't need that, just enough to get to your BOL, it would generally be VERY easy to carry more than enough matches for that.

But I'm way off on a tangent from the original question.... I would just look for the most sustainable option for each item you can but more important would be skills and practice! INCH mentality would require a LOT of skills and capabilities.
 

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It seems that most beginning Preppers start with a BOB, or it's one of the very early goals. I agree it's an important, even essential, milestone to aquire. Over time I have evolved my thinking about the 72 hr aspect of the BOB, and have come to the conclusion that it's just not gonna cut it for us.

I have come to embrace the I'm Never Coming Home philosphy with regards to my BOB. It's not so different than a 72 hr approach except for thinking more along the lines of sustainability over a period of time. I have also come to realize that this isn't so easily accomplished with one single load out, and is better suited to a small group that is able to distribute the load out and allow for redundancy.

My hypothetical question is, geiven 3 or 4 strong and able backs to carry the "I'm Never Coming Home" load out, what would you outfit them with?
I'm afraid my list would be so long a bag is not enough. If you have to start over elsewhere with no preps there at all.. I would think one of those two wheeled game carts would be the base for my retreat. Even spread among 4 or 5 guys my size (6 foot 5, 325 lbs built like a pack mule) I would think there would not be enough to rebuild unless your intentions were to take over somewhere with out a cart or two. Go hunting for two weeks in the mountains.. I can tell you when its colder then all get out it requires pack mules. Is there a end location in mind? or are you talking total start over?? makes a big difference on what your end plans are. I can tell you most if not all farmers will not be easily displaced.
 

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If you are never coming home that would have to be one big bag to carry all the things you would need.
If it were me? I'd stay with a basic bob and place resupply caches at every 72 hour mark in the direction I'm not coming back from.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Not much different than my bob, but I like to advise against INCH bags.

Why? 'Cause I'm biased against them, most people who have INCH bags think they are going to go into the woods and survive on the land. Ain't. Going. To. Happen. I actually advise against INCH concepts to most people. Best example is I recommend strike anywhere matches over a firesteel. Everyone puts a firesteel in their pouch because it can start thousands of fires - which you need in a INCH bag. In in a BOB you don't need that, just enough to get to your BOL, it would generally be VERY easy to carry more than enough matches for that.

But I'm way off on a tangent from the original question.... I would just look for the most sustainable option for each item you can but more important would be skills and practice! INCH mentality would require a LOT of skills and capabilities.
Oh, there are no delusions of lone wolfing it and going native. Rather a consideration that the BOL for some reason isn't there anymore and other alternatives are going to be needed to be found. A situation where your plan has found a nice big blue basket with prepaid postage to hell, and plan B just handed in it's notice.

A situation where you are going to have to find a group where your can make yourselves useful, and there are no promises of how long that could take.
 

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I made my BOB with INCH in mind before I knew what INCH was. Major problem with my load out is ammo. That stuff gets heavy, FAST. Each firearm I have has a purpose in my survival plan but when the situation really happens, which one/s do you bring and how much ammo for each.

22LR hand gun - back up personal protection
22LR rifle - small game (will do the least damage to the meat than any other weapon I have)
AR15 - large game, long to mid range personal protection
5.7/28 - can replace AR15, weighs less and smaller but not as accurate for long range and will be difficult finding ammo in a SHTF situation
9mm hand gun - primary close range personal protection
12ga shot gun with regular and rifled barrel - can be used for all of the above except long range (accurately) and allows getting birds for food. Down side of this is the ammo is very bulky.

Other problems with my load out is I have 1 change of cloths, 2-3 changes of under clothing and socks. This is summer time, for INCH you need to bring/plan for a winter coat, waste of space but needs to be considered.

I do not have any food, spices/seasoning or my canteens filled with water, not including firearms or ammo and my load out comes to just under 30 pounds. My sleeping bag weighs the most (included in that 30 pounds) and I know somethings I can do with out but I think this is do able.

I agree with other posters, you have to have some survival skills before hand for an INCH situation vs. short term, but I don't have much of a choice (I do have survival training). My home does not have the room to prepare for long term bug in. Considering I only leave the house to gather water (near by lake), no fishing or hunting, I have 1 month supplies at this time and can probably store 3 times that. After that I have to INCH. If a situation arises during or at the start of that time where I "absolutely have" to leave for a few days (other then scouting my next location) I don't expect my home/supplies to be here any more, so INCH is the only way to go I see.
 

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You can't bring everything with you regardless if you prefer a i.n.c.h. bag. I do prefer to look at and pack for long term survival compared to 72 hours. 72 hours is short sighted to me. If things have gotten that bad that you need to leave home and live off your BOB than things have gotten bad and you're likely not coming home soon or at all. Seriously, you don't revert to your BOB if you can pack the car or truck and rent a hotel out of town for a while. Or go to a friends or your BOL, by vehicle or any other means of transport getting there faster than walking. And modern conveniences are still there out of town where you live like stocked stores, hotels and restaurant's. Not me anyways. Why the hell would I if I could simply drive to a hotel or friends or families and hold out for a while. My bugout bag is for when everything else has gone to shit and I'm forced to go to ground and get the hell out of Dodge. In that case, I may not have the choice to come home if ever or for a long time.

As for diversifying people's load outs with you, the basics of food, fire, shelter and water, plus knives, tough extra clothing and medical supplies should be in everyone bag if possible. You could get separated and wouldn't it be a death sentence if someone was left without the basics. You can and should diversify the weapons and ammo, as you'll have to. I know I can't carry all my firearms on my back and hundreds of rounds of ammo in magazines for all. I'm neither Superman or a pack mule. I know I'm carrying my M1A with a loadout of 11 to 12 mags. A couple should be used up quickly or will be stashed to cut weight as I go. Than my M9 on my side and about 5 mags for it total. that's quite a bit of weight there, but I've run it more than a few time and I'm not a little guy at 6'4" 250lbs of muscle. My 10/22 will go to someone else of lighter stature or if I'm alone, I'll carry it for as long as possible strapped to my pack and reassess my situation and choices when I'm out there. I'll bury what I feel I need to or look for alternative carry methods.
 

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Regardless of whether or not it's a BOB or INCH, without getting out and using it and having the skills both are pretty much going to get you in trouble. I Just started prepping for about the last 10 months and the biggest thing I have learned is Knowledge is worth more than a 80lb bag of stuff. With the right knowledge the basics will last you a LONG time. Stick with the basics and know how to use them will be the only true way to get you through whatever you have to do.

If you think you Need 5 different knifes with you or 7 different ways to make fire, I suggest you take the time and go spend a week out in the woods with all that and see how really important those things are and find out what you truly need. I will be the first to admit I got caught up in the hype when I first started and had a 60 lb bag of things I thought I NEEDED. Took a few trips and learned really quick that the basics work just fine.

Just some food for thought.

My bag has really been trimmed down.

2 simple ways to make fire
1 Good knife
Sleeping bag
Flashlight with 1 spare set of batteries
1 cooking set
simple first aid kit
550 cord
Water filter
Extra Socks
Gun and Ammo
Tarp
1 bar of soap

Everything else is just a luxury.

This will work for me for either a BoB or INCH as long as you know how to use it all.
 

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wesley,
Your contents remind me of a summer pack for a day hike. My day pack has enough rations for three days and a change of clothes on top of what you list.
If you have to bug-out in the middle of a winter cold snap you might be in trouble. (depending on your location)
 
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wesley,
Your contents remind me of a summer pack for a day hike. My day pack has enough rations for three days and a change of clothes on top of what you list.
If you have to bug-out in the middle of a winter cold snap you might be in trouble. (depending on your location)
It does get cold where I am at. if I really have to bug out, Trust me as I will already have the Cloths on my back to keep me warm. It's going to take a hell of alot for me to have my family just walk away from our home. It would have to be something so extremely out there that the thought of it sends chills down my spine.

I am only bring what we can realistically carry over a long distance and walking out is a absolute last resort.
 

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I am only bring what we can realistically carry over a long distance and walking out is a absolute last resort.
Yup! My bag started out HUGE, and is now about half to 1/3 the size it was - and that is with the addition of extra stuff for the kiddos. I'm a big fan of being ultralight, or at least using some of the concepts.

One thing I thought of today to include in an INCH - documentation, or copies of BC, DL, SS#, etc etc. I have copies at home and BOL but if INCH it might be nice to have some ID and it wouldn't take up too much room.
 

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Everyone must pick their strategy. I could not bug out on foot. Maybe to a location but even then I question my stamina. I think my best trategy is to stand at home and maybe some night attacks or as a sniper.
 

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It is not an unreasonable question since many live in highly populated areas and bugging in or getting home solves nothing.

If you don't plan on going home include at least some of these items...

A really decent water filter, hopefully ceramic so it can be cleaned and doesn't wear out

Limit yourself to 1 weapon, less weight and more ammo for the primary carry, I.e. dump the pistol.

A generous supply of fishing supplies and snares for foraging.

A really decent small hand garden shovel for foraging plants.

Pencils and paper for leaving looking for work ads

Spare clothing, concentrated soap, bag balm, first aid supplies

Army sleep system for each person, a tarp for bad weather.

A pound of salt and pepper

20 Morgan silver dollars for barter

Work and hunting gloves, boonie hat, wind bottle cork (to blacken face)

Obviously not a complete list but some things to consider
 

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I'm taking a break from resorting reorganizing and repacking my bags, every so often (6 months to a year) I like to go through by bags and replace batteries check expiration dates and add or update my gear. I can tell you by what I've got stacked the floor that there is no way I can pack enough of it to get me much past the one week mark. I would have to preplan it and have my resupplies cached. I've come to the conclusion that if I ever have to bug out on foot I am not going to be happy about it.
 

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All I know about carrying a BOB or INCH is they get heavy in a hurry. I went for an overnite backpacking trip the other day and found that my bag was way to heavy. The trail started at around 8,000ft and went up to 9,200ft. I don't know what the pack started out weighing, but I checked when I got home. It was 39.4lbs and it about killed me on the hike out. I am a fairly active 42yr old who rides BMX, enduro motorcycle, and skateboards with the kids, so Im not a total soggy SOB. But I can tell you that 40lbs or so is too much for me over rough country, especially with extremely steep and rocky grades. I found that the overnite temps, even in summer at that elevation, are pretty cool for what I had backed for my sleep system. When I got home I completely emptied the bag, and added what was necessary and removed the fluff. The perk pot for coffee over the campfire is great for car camping, but it has no place in my bag now, way too heavy. Instant coffee in the future if any at all. I had too many redundancies in way of cutting tools.

I did catch my dinner, a nice Cut-Bow trout, and found my folding saw to be very useful around camp. Other than cleaning the fish I used my knife(s) very little, so I don't need 4 in my bag. A decent folder and a good fixed blade should be plenty. This was the first time I used my MSR waterfilter, it works great! Water tastes just like it does out of my RO at home....tasteless.

I'm glad I went on this trip. I learned a lot about what my carrying abilities are, and what I need additional work on.

A heavy pack, elevation, rough terrain, and FATIGUE are not good bedfellows for SURE. Would be very easy to slip, fall, twist or break something out here. Then add the weight and change in balance with a heavy pack, and you have a potentially dangerous situation. This trip was only about 4mi round trip, and it about killed me. A real eye opener!



 

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It seems that most beginning Preppers start with a BOB, or it's one of the very early goals. I agree it's an important, even essential, milestone to aquire. Over time I have evolved my thinking about the 72 hr aspect of the BOB, and have come to the conclusion that it's just not gonna cut it for us.

I have come to embrace the I'm Never Coming Home philosphy with regards to my BOB. It's not so different than a 72 hr approach except for thinking more along the lines of sustainability over a period of time. I have also come to realize that this isn't so easily accomplished with one single load out, and is better suited to a small group that is able to distribute the load out and allow for redundancy.

My hypothetical question is, geiven 3 or 4 strong and able backs to carry the "I'm Never Coming Home" load out, what would you outfit them with?
I assumed they were one in the same. If it got to the point where I had to bug out (I'm in the military so depending on the situation it may take a lot) I know I would not be coming back.
 

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I don't believe that a person could carry enough in a any type of bag, and thought of trying to bug out in a WTSHTF situation is just insane. Think about it, you got yourself and your family packed down with heavy packs and because your the leader in your family your out front, so your the first to walk into the ambush and are killed, your family raped, murdered, or worse. All your preps are now the property of others. Same with a vehicle packed with goodies. I'm doing everything I can to prepare but the fact of the matter is if my family is starving or is in need of anything, I will be killing and stealing. Hate to point out the elephant in the room but be honest with yourselves.

google: One Year In Hell…Surviving a Full SHTF Collapse in Bosnia
 
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