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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Great info Lazerus!!!!!
 

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Here's my bike (below) in the middle of Wales some years ago, I did about 70 miles that day. My sleeping bag and food are crammed into the saddlebag and my tent is strapped on top.The orange waterproof jacket is lashed over the whole caboodle to rainproof everything.
Like I said earlier, the trick is to NEVER push the pace, so get off for a rest and a snack every few miles and walk up all the hills and you can go on for ever, any reasonably fit person could do 50 miles a day.
Furthest I did in one day was 140 miles many years ago, I haven't cycled much in recent years and doubt if I could do more than 60 now I'm old (sniffle).
PS- DON'T cycle in winter unless you HAVE to, it's twice as hard as summer because it feels like you're cycling into a wall of cold.

 

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My latest Montague FOLDING Bike Build.


I just sold this folder last week, but I still have a decent quality Kona Cindercone Mountain bike for ever day use and another ARMY Green Montague FOLDER set up with top of the line components for my Bug Out Bike.

Currently playing around with different racks and panniers to get the Bug Out Bike loaded with the weight distribution just right.
The Ruger 10/22 take down is neat and comes in a really decent quality soft case ... but I want to hang a rifle scabbard at the front, along my fork tubes, for quick access.
HMMmm??
LAZ 1
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Nice bike Laz.
 

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In a lack of fuel situation they are better than walking. The most common fault with reliability are the tires and inner tubes.

If you need to carry a load, they can be walked carrying hundreds of pounds.

I have two trailers that I can pull with my bikes.
 

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I believe that the Swiss Army still utilizes bicycles in moving their units. They do not ride them, but attack a rod to the handlebars that extends to the side, load the bicycle with equipment, and push the bicycle by the attached rod. I also believe this method was used by the North Vietnamese on the Ho Chi Min trail.
My concern is not so much gridlock as it is most cars no longer being operational due to an EMP. Also my wife has rheumatoid arthritis and would not be able to walk for a long distance. I went with a Miami Sun Trike that has a basket on the back and I have a wagon that I can attach to the back.
 

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i too think a bug-out-bike is a great asset. as i live in the heart of a 1.5 mil people city i think gridlock is going to happen for sure. i have to battle rushhour for an hour everyday i go to work and back. and that for less than 10 miles. i agree with your guy's opinion that a bike can carry heavy loads. i definitely wil only use a bike as my bov. i have a concept in place for splitting up my gear and taking it with me in the different places when i have to bug on by bike.

1. saddle-bags and stuff strapped to the back of the bike.
here i will put everything i extra, like extra knives, food, water, firestarter, (soon after getting my license) ammo. if i have to leave my bike behind in a hurry because of an ambush, i might lose some extra stuff that will make survival more comfortable and much easier.however losing it will not be the end. plus, i don't have to carry the heaviest suff

2. My bob which is a large hiking backpack. i will have this one on my back while cycling. in there will be the main survival gear. tarp, some food, small bottle of water, fire starting equipment etc...some more ammo soon for sure, but only a smaller amount (weight issue)
so should i lose my bike, i'm still good to go and don't have to necesarily fight for it

3. should i lose my backpack too, f.e. being ambushed, grabbed from behind etc. i will have some essentials on my person (vest, on the belt, pockets of my pants...) there will be the really most essential items. maybe 1 mag or two of ammo, a knife, some lighters, one emergency blanket, a candy bar... if i lose this, i'm way too deep into trouble anyway...
 

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Getting ambushed on your bike=death.
i think it all depends on the situation. sure walking into a trap with lots of people shooting at you from every direction ::rambo:: = death... a single guy shooting at you...you could leave your bike behind. he's more likely interested in your stuff than killing you. let him search your stuff while you run away. could be an option?!
 

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Getting ambushed on your bike=death.
No worse and maybe better then getting ambushed in your car. If someone is setting up an ambush for someone in a car they will hear you coming from a long distance away while they may not know your are near until you are on top of them on a bike, will set up something to either slow or stop your vehicle, you are less likely to observe the ambushers from your vehicle then a bicycle, and once they open fire it is more difficult to fight from your vehicle then it is to get off your bike and return fire.
There are advantages and disadvantages to both modes of transportation. You will have to weigh them in your mind when deciding what to do.
 

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There is a lot of conversation surrounding bug out vehicles. What is the best? What is the most powerful? Which is fastest? Do you use gas, diesel or multi-fuel? Do you go big, small or in the middle? All of which are great topics for debate. But what happens when the fuel runs out? When the oil pan gets punctured and you throw a rod through the block? A softball sized hole gets punched through your radiator? The logistics and support for keeping that vehicle running is extensive. Parts, spare tires, tools, fuel, oil, water, belts, hoses etc. In a true bug-out situation, you could feasibly need a small parts store to maintain it. And you need an extensive know how to fix it.

Better yet, your bug out plan met unforeseen issues that caused serious delays and now the roads are so clogged, you can't get anywhere to begin with. Now what? Ever try to conceal a large vehicle "johnny on the spot"? I don't know too many diesels that are all that quiet either. I am not discounting the value of these vehicles by any means. I'd love nothing better than to have a Ma Deuce sitting in my back yard ready to go. But what about an alternative? Maybe even a primary BOV.

The bicycle has been used by the armed forces of the world since at least the late 1800's. Bicycles have been used in each World War, and Vietnam. The Danish, the Finnish, British and even Americans used them. In Vietnam, the Viet-Cong used them to ferry supplies down the Ho-Chi Minh Trail. Of the most famous, are the Swiss Army Bikes, still in use today.

So why not a bug out vehicle? As I had posted in another thread regarding the benefit of a bicycle for exercise and why I like them, I also posted the following regarding their value as a BOV;

Bicycles for bug-out have a lot of flexibility. You can tow things with them; the little carts you see people pulling their small children around in make great supply trailers. They can be outfitted to hold weapons; Hunters outfit bikes all the time. It allows them to quickly and quietly get into areas that motor vehicles aren't allowed to go. You don't have to worry about fuel. They're easily concealable behind bushes, in ditches or wherever you happen to be. They are easy to work on with a few simple tools and, with a couple of specialized tools, there is nothing you can't do to them. Bikes are everywhere and spare parts, such as chains, tires, wheels, inner-tubes, brakes, bearings etc., are easy to come by, or, a whole 'nother bike if that's what it takes. They're great for quickly and quietly moving through, or, in and out of areas that you don't necessarily want to attract attention, especially at night. And, if you really need it, you can buy a kit for less than $250 and mount an engine on it for emergencies (creating distance) or those really steep hills that you just don't feel like climbing. These engines get about 150 miles to the gallon and, depending on overall weight/load and gearing, you'll see speeds of 15 to 30 mph. As I said, my top speed is about 15 mph, maybe a little more. My cruising speed is about 10mph, at a nice gentle pace I enjoy. I can only maintain that for so long. Lance Armstrong I am not. But that little engine can maintain that 15 mph as a minimal speed until it overheats or runs out of fuel. Once fuel becomes an issue/non-existent, simply remove the engine and it's other components and go. So bicycles not only provide me with the exercise I need, and make it mostly enjoyable, but they also meet my "get the hell out of here" needs.

It is not much more effort, as long you have trained for it some, to haul a hundred, even two hundred pounds of gear between your bicycle and a trailer. You make much faster time on a bike than on foot, especially a vehicle stuck in deadlocked traffic. And, if you choose to bug out in a motor vehicle, bicycle's make a great secondary means of escape. Load necessities in the trailer(s) and go.

Whether a primary way to bug out, or as a back-up, bicycles should not be discounted as part of the overall plan. Fuel will only last so long; both in quantity and quality/usability, no matter how much stabilizer you add. A bug out survival plan of any merit has redundant back-up plans. A bicycle should be one of them. And a legitimate one at that.
awesome just looked it up on you tube cheap mopeds electic kind or gas also a plain ol mountain bike is better than walkin thanks dude
 

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In the mid 80's a friend of mine took a bicycle trip around the US, starting in the northwest he went south to LA then east to Atlanta north to New York and then west to Idaho and the point at which he started.

The one thing he spoke about that would be of interest to those who want to use a bicycle as a primary mode of transportation is the maintenance. My friend said he was routinely straightening rims that went out of true, changing worn out tires, fixing flats and replacing an occasional worn out chain.
 

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Thank you for this post - I have been having the exact same thoughts! The trailor for dragging items is definitely purchase I will be making. I definitely think getting fit and strong is a vital part of prepping and me and my partner have already started riding the bikes and building up our stamina.
 

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Here is a copy of the trike that I use. Bicycle Tire Wheel Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle wheel


My plan is not ride it most of the time, but to attach a pole to the handle bars and push it. It's a little hard to see, but there is a large basket on the back, and there is a bar on the rear axle for attaching a cart or wagon. The one I have for it can carry 300lbs. I do have a spare chain, tires/patches, and a pump, all of which weigh less then 1 1/2 lbs. This is produced by a company called Miami Sun. Walmart sells model that looks very similar but after reading the reviews I decided on the more expensive model. It may cost more but I wanted something that I could depend on. If nothing else, the natural springs for water supply are about 3/4 mile from me and I should be able to haul about 20 gallons of water at a time with it.
 

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Thanks for sharing that NotSoYoung. A very good idea, I will consider getting one of these in the future as right now I have a mountain/hybrid bike. I was considering doing the same thing with my mountain bike but I have no idea how it would fare pulling all that weight is the only problem.
 

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Jess, As proved by the North Vietnamese you can push quite a bit of weight on a bicycle using it as a carrying device.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive tire


You can take almost any old bike with a steel frame, cut it up and reweld it into a trailer.
 

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Here are a couple of trailers that I made.
This one was made from a couple of std bike forks welded between a tube. The 1/4" plywood floor was hung between them on brackets. The tongue used a spherical rod end.
Wheel Bicycle Tire Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle frame


My second trailer was made from 3/4" square tubing. Was 54"x36". Uses bicycle wheels (the same size as your bicycle. Same trailer hitch. I can run it on my motorbike for hauling around my farm.
Bicycle Wheel Tire Land vehicle Bicycles--Equipment and supplies

I used cattle panel welded in for floor.
Since then I have narrowed it put in a recumbent seat and am going to make it into a tandem for general riding. It still will be useful as a trailer however. I have not worked on it for 6 months.

Here is my trailer hitch.
Bicycle Bicycle wheel Wheel Bicycle frame Tire

It uses a 3/8" spherical rod end. The bike mount can be either an L bracket like this one or a perhaps better a C bracket and just drop a bolt through. Like this:
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Gear Vehicle brake Alloy wheel


Here it is hooked to my dirt bike.
Wheel Tire Motorcycle Automotive tire Vehicle


Well those are my ideas. Maybe they will help someone.
 

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As an avid mountain biker, i will definitely be using my bike as much as I can. Just a couple things I can't stress enough about. Get a good compact pump....can be used for many things other than pumping up a tire, a quick mod turns it into a fuel transfer pump! next is DON'T cheap out on tires, get good tires with big lugs so you can off road the thing! Keep a good tire patch kit or two on you at all times, I have emptied a whole kit of patches in one summer from riding over rough terrain. And last but not least, keep a small can of chain lube with you, and keep that chain oiled, A rusty chain is noisy, and will break easier under heavier loads! doesn't hurt to keep a chain tool in that tire repair kit either.
here is a link of a good company that makes all you need for bike maintenance, cheers and enjoy
http://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j...8Ku-Gygw76XIfo0lDfQoPUA&bvm=bv.62922401,d.cGU
 
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