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Discussion Starter #1
Full disclosure; I run this blog. I created a crop list for what I believe to be the best crops to have. I am looking to add a bit to this list as some I've pointed out it is not ideal for all climates. I am hoping the community could help me out, here is what I found in my research.

Survival Farming: The Best Crops For When SHTF | TheSurvivalist
 

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Number one would be potatoes. Easy to grow and care for,easy to store and a lot of benefit for your efforts
 
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Field corn takes 6-8 lb of seed per acre and a 10' x 50' area to grow 1 Bushel. Grain Sorghum (Milo) takes 2-8 lb of seed per acre and a 10' x 60' area to grow 1 Bushel.
When it comes to grains Oats need an area 10' x 62' for 1 Bushel at a rate of 80 lb of seed per acre. Buckwheat takes 50 lb seed per acre but requires an area 10' x 130' to grow a Bushel. Rye can be planted during the off season of Corn-Milo at a rate of 84 lb of seed per acre but it will require an area of 10 x 145' to grow a Bushel. Wheat at a rate of 75-90 lb of seed per acre will require 10' x 109' area to grow 1 Bushel.

I'd add Grain Sorghum (Milo) 2-8 lb of seed per acre, if mobility (how much it weighs to carry) and area (plot size) are of concern. Buckwheat and Oats are about a push when it comes to how much seed weighs per Bushel Harvested but Buckwheat will require roughly twice the area. Hope this is in keeping with your Original question.
 

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I will grow what works in this climate and provides abundance for effort.
 

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I have a maple tree in my yard with a base just shy of 15 inches, can I harvest syrup without fear of killing it? ( i once heard that you need an 18 tree but don't know if that is for yeild or to prevent tree death)
 

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I am asking on a hunch. I have a 100 feet of chain link fence, what about peas and beans? Wouldn't that be a good crop considering that it takes up almost no space in my yard?
I had a garden in town one year, . . . simply a hoed out row, . . . 4 inches wide, . . . about 30 feet long, . . . planted Ky wonder pole beans in that little space about 6 inches apart. We had way more than enough beans for the three of us that year.

It was one of those freak growing years, . . . no doubt, . . . but it just goes to show what "can" happen.

Taters, onions, beans, carrots, beets, cabbage, tomatoes, . . . rounded out by some field corn as well, . . . they'd be my first choices.

Punkins, squash, and corn grow well together, . . . so I'd be putting them in together, . . . knowing that I like corn bread real well, . . . field corn makes good corn bread as well as tacos.

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Also, aren't apple and pecan trees a good idea, too?
I think they're a great idea, that goes more into permaculture though. I didn't feel they were appropriate for this list. Also went for crops that will grow in most climates.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I keep seeing beans, I couldn't find enough info to make an adequate guide. Mainly because I couldn't narrow it down to a specific type...
 

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i grow all that weird stuff that no one else recognizes as food. chaya, casava,surinam spinach, longevity spinach,malanga,lots of weeds are edible, spanish needle(bidens alba) grows here so fast you cant mow it down fast enough. full of vitamins and minerals.wild purslane grows wild here and is full of omega 3 fatty acids. AGAIN i recommend everyone that gardens look into permaculture, the procedures the plants they use everyting :)
 

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I like full disclosure, thanks for that, note: please don't quote my dribble on your blog :)

to your blog, thanks for the info, kinda strange coming from a survivalist but good info indeed cheers
 

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For us it's cabbage, turnips (Japanese Radishes), peppers and beans
 

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If I had to pick just one garden item for survival, it would be Mangal (fodder) beets. They can grow in poor soil, each beet can grow to 20 pounds, and they store well. The roots, stems and leaves can be eaten, giving a LOT of nutrients. Fodder beets have been used in Europe for hundreds of years as a winter survival food for both humans and livestock.
 

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I have a maple tree in my yard with a base just shy of 15 inches, can I harvest syrup without fear of killing it? ( i once heard that you need an 18 tree but don't know if that is for yeild or to prevent tree death)
Trees with trunks smaller than 10 inches should not be tapped. South side is usually the most productive tap. Drill 2 to 3 inches at an upward angle of 10 to 20 Degrees. 7/16 inch for standard 1/2 inch spike. Trees with trunks over 24 inches in diameter can be tapped on all four sides. Tap anywhere from 2 to 6 feet up. As soon as the whole is drilled insert the tap.

Best resource for traditional skills I've found is (BACK TO BASICS) Readers Digest. Not the end all, but quite enlightening. JMHO.
 

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Trees with trunks smaller than 10 inches should not be tapped..
That's what she said!

*sorry folks, couldn't resist*

Joking aside it really has to do with your specific location. Annual rainfall, soil composition, access to water, temperature, local pests and the list goes on.

The best bet is to have a garden every year to hone your skills and learn what works well on your property and what doesn't. You will gain valuable experience this way. Much better than waiting until shtf and cracking open a "seed vault" only to find out you have all the wrong stuff. JM2C.
 
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